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I wrote a simple sql query - http://pastebin.com/AdJAabzb - but its not optimal at all. I want to do outer join on 'news' when menu.type == news OR on 'articles' when menu.type == 'article' OR on 'subpages' when menu.type == 'page'. If type is different (eg. none or ext) seo_filename should be NULL.

SELECT 
 menu.*
 , news.seo_filename AS news_seo_filename
 , articles.seo_filename AS article_seo_filename
 , subpages.seo_filename AS subpage_seo_filename
FROM menu
LEFT OUTER JOIN news ON menu.link = news.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN articles ON menu.link = articles.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN subpages ON menu.link = subpages.id 
ORDER BY lft

How to do it using one query with if'f or sth?

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Please put your code here (cut and paste and put four spaces before each line) . It's hard to read in another browser tab and it's only about ten lines long. –  wildplasser Sep 17 '11 at 14:05

3 Answers 3

My "unsmart union" solution. This will perform reasonable in Postgres, because the keyfields can be hoisted out of the subqueries.

NOTE: The need for an UNION is nearly always a result of a design flaw in the data model.

WITH  un AS (
  SELECT 'articles' AS menutype
  , ar.id AS id
  , ar.seo_filename AS filename
  FROM articles ar
  UNION
  SELECT 'news' AS menutype
  , ne.id AS id
  , ne.seo_filename AS filename
  FROM news ne
  UNION
  SELECT 'pages' AS menutype
  , pa.id AS id
  , pa.seo_filename AS filename
  FROM pages pa
  ) 
SELECT
 me.*
 , un.filename
 FROM menu me
  , un
 WHERE me.menutype = un.menutype
 AND me.id = un.id
  ;

EDIT: NOTE: I changed the columnnames a bit ...

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Try with CASE:

SELECT 
    M.*,
    CASE(M.type)
        WHEN 'news' THEN N.seo_filename
        WHEN 'articles' THEN A.seo_filename
        WHEN 'page' THEN S.seo_filename
        ELSE NULL
    END AS seo_filename
FROM 
    menu M
        LEFT OUTER JOIN news N ON M.link = N.id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN articles A ON M.link = A.id
        LEFT OUTER JOIN subpages S ON M.link = S.id 
ORDER BY 
    M.lft 

I am not sure where this lft field comes from, but I assume from table menu.

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Another possible solution:

SELECT 
 menu.*
 , COALESCE( news.seo_filename, articles.seo_filename, subpages.seo_filename)
   AS seo_filename
FROM menu
LEFT OUTER JOIN news ON menu.link = news.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN articles ON menu.link = articles.id
LEFT OUTER JOIN subpages ON menu.link = subpages.id 
ORDER BY lft
;
share|improve this answer
    
this may not hold true if the sought id would be articles.seo_filename and the same id (for example, 1) exists in both news and articles tables. COALESCE returns the first non-null. –  leon Sep 17 '11 at 17:31
    
You are right. But his datamodel sucks anyway... –  wildplasser Sep 17 '11 at 18:38
    
that goes without saying –  leon Sep 17 '11 at 20:07

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