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Can you please help me understand what the following code means:

x += 0.1;
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1  
Looks like adding 0.1 to a variable named x.. – Friek Sep 17 '11 at 17:13
1  
Almost a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/608721/… – rds Jan 3 '12 at 21:40
up vote 48 down vote accepted

x += i IS NOT identical to x = x + i. Generally it is a shorthand, but if x and i are of different types, their behavior differ.

    int x = 0;
    x += 1.1;    // just fine; hidden cast, x = 1 after assignment
    x = x + 1.1; // won't compile! Eclipse says 'cannot convert from double to int'

Quote from Joshua Bloch's Java Puzzlers:

(...) compound assignment expressions automatically cast the result of the computation they perform to the type of the variable on their left-hand side. If the type of the result is identical to the type of the variable, the cast has no effect. If, however, the type of the result is wider than that of the variable, the compound assignment operator performs a silent narrowing primitive conversion [JLS 5.1.3].

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1  
+1 new information for me – Eng.Fouad Sep 17 '11 at 17:29
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+1 thanks for book recommendation, the title sounds quite interesting – smas Sep 17 '11 at 19:27
    
+1, it must perform the cast BEFORE assignment. – Peter Lawrey Sep 17 '11 at 20:00
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Additionally, if x is a more complicated expression (like array or field access) instead of a single variable, its component expressions are now only evaluated once instead of twice. – Paŭlo Ebermann Sep 17 '11 at 21:07
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All my professors have lied :O – Rob Fox Sep 20 '11 at 10:25

It's one of the assignment operators. It takes the value of x, adds 0.1 to it, and then stores the result of (x + 0.1) back into x.

So:

double x = 1.3;
x += 0.1;    // sets 'x' to 1.4

It's functionally identical to, but shorter than:

double x = 1.3;
x = x + 0.1;

NOTE: When doing floating-point math, things don't always work the way you think they will.

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  • x += y is x = x + y
  • x -= y is x = x - y
  • x *= y is x = x * y
  • x /= y is x = x / y
  • x %= y is x = x % y
  • x ^= y is x = x ^ y
  • x &= y is x = x & y
  • x |= y is x = x | y

and so on ...

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how about =+ ? it compiles but does nothing – kommradHomer May 9 '13 at 9:48
    
@kommradHomer x =+ y is equivalent to x = y. – Eng.Fouad Jun 17 '14 at 11:51

It will add the result of the operation Math.pow(x[i] - mean, 2) to the devtop variable.

A more simple example:

int devtop = 2;
devtop += 3; // devtop now equals 5
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Add Math.pow(x[i] - mean, 2) to devtop.

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protected by Community Nov 5 '14 at 19:33

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