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I can't get my haskell code as modular as I want it to be. I'm probably just stuck in my object oriented paradigm and having trouble thinking functionally, but I'm totally stumped.

I have a data and two functions which operate on it:

data TruthType = TT_Boolean String 
               | TT_Percent Double

conjunction :: TruthType -> TruthType -> TruthType
disjunction :: TruthType -> TruthType -> TruthType

Normally, you would implement these functions right next to each other, like this:

conjunction :: TruthType -> TruthType -> TruthType
conjunction (TT_Percent x) (TT_Percent y) = TT_Percent (x*y)
conjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "f"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"

disjunction :: TruthType -> TruthType -> TruthType
disjunction (TT_Percent x) (TT_Percent y) = TT_Percent (x + (1-x)*y)
disjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"

This compiles and runs exactly like I expect it. The problem is, that I plan on implementing about 20 different TruthTypes, and many more functions for each one. So it makes more sense to group my functions based on which TruthType constructor they are acting upon:

-- TT_Percent
conjunction (TT_Percent x) (TT_Percent y) = TT_Percent (x*y)
disjunction (TT_Percent x) (TT_Percent y) = TT_Percent (x + (1-x)*y)

-- TT_Boolean
conjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "f"
conjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"

disjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "t") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "t") = TT_Boolean "t"
disjunction (TT_Boolean "f") (TT_Boolean "f") = TT_Boolean "f"

If both of these sections are in the same file, I get a compilation error claiming that I am redefining the conjunction and disjunction functions. I don't want to erase the old definition, I want both definitions to be valid. Are there any compiler flags that I can use to allow this redefining?

Ultimately, my goal is to have each of these different TruthTypes defined in it's own file. If I do that, then I get an ambiguity error because it doesn't know which function to use. Is there a way to get GHC to try all of them since only one will actually be defined on the TruthType being called against?

PS. This may seem like a great use case for type classes, but it's actually not. I have to be able to write functions that return "instances" of TruthType, something like the "classReturn" function in this example:

class (Show a, Eq a) => TruthClass a where
    conjunction :: a -> a -> a
    disjunction :: a -> a -> a

instance TruthClass Bool where

    conjunction True  True  = True
    conjunction True  False = False
    conjunction False True  = False
    conjunction False False = False

    disjunction True  True  = True
    disjunction True  False = True
    disjunction False True  = True
    disjunction False False = False

instance TruthClass Double where
    conjunction x y = x*y
    disjunction x y = x + (1-x)*y

classReturn :: (TruthClass a) => String -> a   -- This fails to compile because it would allow the failure function below, which violates conjunction's type
classReturn "True" = True
classReturn "False" = False
classReturn "1" = 1
classReturn "0" = 0

failure = conjunction (classReturn "True") (classReturn "1")

Edit:

Okay, I can now explain better why I couldn't get the type classes to work, and why the offered solutions don't work for me. Look at the following (based on augustss's solution below):

*Main> conjunction True True -- works because type is inferred
True

*Main> classReturn "True" :: Bool -- works because type is explicitly stated
True

*Main> classReturn "True" -- does not work, but this is what I need

<interactive>:1:0:
    Ambiguous type variable `a' in the constraint:
      `TruthClass a'
        arising from a use of `classReturn' at <interactive>:1:0-17
    Probable fix: add a type signature that fixes these type variable(s)

In my program, I won't be able to specify which type it is. I am parsing an input file using parsec. When it hits a line "#bool" all the subsequent variables created should be of type TT_Boolean. When it hits "#percent" all the subsequent variables should be of type TT_Percent. Therefore, I can't hard code what the type will be when I call a function, and it seems that you must hard code it if you use a type class. The solution using data solves this problem, but runs into the lack of modularity caused by data.

share|improve this question
    
Why not overload classReturn as well? Just make it a member of the class. – augustss Sep 17 '11 at 19:19
    
BTW, I think x + y - x*y highlights the symmetry better, but maybe you have some numerical reason for your version? – augustss Sep 17 '11 at 19:34
    
Something got lost in your comment. – augustss Sep 17 '11 at 19:47
class (Read a, Show a, Eq a) => TruthClass a where
    conjunction :: a -> a -> a
    disjunction :: a -> a -> a
    classReturn :: String -> a
    classReturn = read

instance TruthClass Bool where
    conjunction = (&&)
    disjunction = (||)

instance TruthClass Double where
    conjunction x y = x*y
    disjunction x y = x + (1-x)*y
share|improve this answer
    
For some reason, I was thinking that for a function to be in a class it had to use the class as a parameter. I'll have to play around some, but I think this will work. Thanks. – Mike Izbicki Sep 17 '11 at 19:54
2  
Being able to return the class parameter is one of the advantages of Haskell type classes over OO classes. – augustss Sep 17 '11 at 19:55
2  
@Mike Izbicki: Stuff in a class doesn't even need parameters at all, actually! You can have specific values as part of the class as well--look at Monoid, for example. Remember, the class itself is something more abstract--the type parameter just stands in for whatever concrete type is used to define the instances. The only thing you can't do is not mention it at all. – C. A. McCann Sep 17 '11 at 20:10
    
@augustss I have edited my question to reflect why this solution is not working for me. – Mike Izbicki Sep 18 '11 at 6:34
    
@You don't have to hard code it at all. But without knowing what you're producing from this whole thing I can't tell you what to do. – augustss Sep 18 '11 at 9:26

But you can also keep your original design, only that you must not have equations for disjunction between equations for conjunction and vice versa.

A function consists of all its equations, but they must occur contiguously in the source code.

EDIT: show an example how what Mike wants can be done:

If you have that many clauses, you can split you one single great function into multiple ones:

conjunction PrincipleCase1 = conjunctionForCase1 ...
conjunction PrincipleCase2 = conjunctionForCase2 ...

and then you can put the function that handsle the detailed case in different positions, modules and whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't think of a good reason why they must occur continuously, except that it would usually create cleaner code. (The exception of course being my own case.) It seems like there should be a way to force it to allow non-contiguous definitions. – Mike Izbicki Sep 18 '11 at 6:35
    
Mike, please see my edit. – Ingo Sep 18 '11 at 10:14

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