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I'm coming back to c++ after using Java for a long time. In Java overriding the toString method on an object allows the object to be automatically translated into a string and concatenated to other strings.

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(new Test() + " There"); // prints hello there
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "Hello";
    }
}

Is there anything similar that would allow me to stream an object into cout?

cout << Test() << endl;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The equivalent is to overload operator<<:

#include <ostream>

class Test
{
  int t;
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Test& t)
{
   os << "Hello";
   return os;
}

You would then use it like this:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::cout << Test() << " There" << std::endl;
}

See the code in action: http://codepad.org/pH1CVYPR

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2  
Overload, not override (override implies that an operator<< for ostream and Test already exists and you are overriding it). –  Matteo Italia Sep 17 '11 at 21:39
    
You may want to consider defining the operators for streams taking other kind of characters/traits as well. –  K-ballo Sep 17 '11 at 21:39
    
@Matteo: Thanks, I used the wrong one in haste and have fixed it. –  Bill Sep 17 '11 at 21:40
2  
template< typename Char, typename Traits > std::basic_ostream< Char, Traits >& operator<<(std::basic_ostream< Char, Traits >& os, const Test& t) will work for all kind of output streams, including std::wcout for instance which is the equivalent of std::cout specified for wchar_t types. –  K-ballo Sep 17 '11 at 21:45
1  
@Bill: Besides the fact that your declaration of the operator is a no-op, the obvious difference between your version and mine is that mine only works for basic_ostream types while yours would work for anything, giving a compile time error if the os << t operation is not well formed for that particular os, or worse silently doing who knows what if the expression is valid and os is not an output stream. Also, note that the full implementation for the output insertion is a bit more complex than just `os << "Hello", as pointed out by @Matteo Italia. –  K-ballo Sep 17 '11 at 22:55

The common idiom is to create an overload of operator<< that takes an output stream as the left-hand operand.

#include <iostream>

struct Point
{
    double x;
    double y;
    Point(double X, double Y)
      : x(X), y(Y)
    {}
};

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & Stream, const Point & Obj)
{
    // Here you can do whatever you want with your stream (Stream)
    // and the object being written into it (Obj)
    // For our point we can just print its coordinates
    Stream<<"{"<<Obj.x<<", "<<Obj.y<<"}";
    return Stream; // return the stream to allow chained writes
}

int main()
{
    Point APoint(10.4, 5.6);
    std::cout<<APoint<<std::endl; // this will print {10.4, 5.6}
    return 0;
}

If you want to support streams with other character types (e.g. wchar_t)/template parameters of the streams you have to write different overloads for the various types of streams you want to support, or, if your code is (more or less) independent from such types, you can simply write a template operator<<.

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You could template on the character type and use std::basic_ostream<TChar>... –  Kerrek SB Sep 17 '11 at 21:46
    
@Kerrek: sure, that's what I meant with the "template operator<<". –  Matteo Italia Sep 17 '11 at 21:51

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