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Problem

I am making a celsius to fahrenheit converter and vice versa.

All of my code works perfect but I am not sure how to make the chart the teacher wants.

The output are of 0 to 100 degrees celsius and 32 to 212 degrees fahrenheit.

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;
using std::setw;

int i;

int ftemp;
int ctemp;

int farToC(int a, int b);
int celToF(int a, int b);

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
cout << "Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures: " << endl;

for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    cout << "Celsius Farenheit ";
}
cout << endl;

for(i = 0; i < 101; i++)
{
    cout << setw(7) << i << setw(8) << " " << celToF(i, ftemp)<< endl;
}
cout << endl;

cout << "Celsius equivalents of Farenheit temperatures: " << endl;
for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    cout << "Fahrenheit Celsius ";
}
cout << endl;

for(i = 32; i < 213; i++)
{
    cout << setw(10) << i << setw(7) << " " << farToC(i, ctemp)<< endl;
}
cout << endl;
}

int farToC(int a, int b)
{
b = (a - 32) * 5 / 9;
return b;
}

int celToF(int a, int b)
{
b = (a * 9/5) + 32;
return b;
}

Here is my output:

Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures: 
Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit 
      0        32
      1        33
      2        35
      3        37
      4        39
      5        41
      6        42
      7        44
      8        46
      9        48
     10        50 
         ...


Celsius equivalents of Farenheit temperatures: 
Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius 
        32       0
        33       0
        34       1
        35       1
        36       2
        37       2
        38       3
        39       3
        40       4
        41       5
        42       5
            ...

Here is what my teacher wants: celsius from 0 to 100 degrees.

Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures: 
Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit 
      0        32      25        77      50       122
      1        33      26        78      51       123
      2        35      27        80      52       125
      3        37      28        82      53       127
      4        39      29        84      54       129
      5        41      30        86      55       131
      6        42      31        87      56       132
      7        44      32        89      57       134
      8        46      33        91      58       136
      9        48      34        93      59       138
     10        50      35        95      60       140
    ...

And the same for fahrenheit but from 32 to 212 degrees...

I know how to align the numbers with the words using setw() but I am not sure how to do columns.

Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!


Solution

Thanks everyone for your help. I figured it out after thinking for a minutes!

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;
using std::setw;

int i;
int k;

int ftemp;
int ctemp;

int farToC(int a, int b);
int celToF(int a, int b);

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
cout << "Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures: " << endl;

for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    cout << "Celsius Farenheit ";
}

cout << endl;

for(k = 0; k < 25; k++)
{
    for(i = 0; i < 101; i+= 25)
    {
        cout << setw(7) << i+k << setw(10) << celToF(i+k, ftemp) << " " << setw(10);
    }
    cout<< endl;
}

cout << endl;

cout << "Celsius equivalents of Farenheit temperatures: " << endl;

for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    cout << "Fahrenheit Celsius ";
}

cout << endl;

for(k = 0; k < 45; k++)
{
    for(i = 32; i < 213; i += 45)
    {
        cout << setw(10) << i+k << setw(8) << farToC(i+k, ctemp) << " "  << setw(12);
    }
    cout << endl;
}

cout << endl;
}

int farToC(int a, int b)
{
b = (a - 32) * 5 / 9;
return b;
}

int celToF(int a, int b)
{
b = (a * 9/5) + 32;
return b;
}

My output:

Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures: 
Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit 
      0        32      25        77      50       122      75       167     100       212 
      1        33      26        78      51       123      76       168     101       213 
      2        35      27        80      52       125      77       170     102       215 
      3        37      28        82      53       127      78       172     103       217 
      4        39      29        84      54       129      79       174     104       219 
      5        41      30        86      55       131      80       176     105       221 
      6        42      31        87      56       132      81       177     106       222 
      7        44      32        89      57       134      82       179     107       224 
      8        46      33        91      58       136      83       181     108       226 
      9        48      34        93      59       138      84       183     109       228 
     10        50      35        95      60       140      85       185     110       230 
 ...

Celsius equivalents of Farenheit temperatures: 
Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius Fahrenheit Celsius 
        32       0         77      25        122      50        167      75        212     100 
        33       0         78      25        123      50        168      75        213     100 
        34       1         79      26        124      51        169      76        214     101 
        35       1         80      26        125      51        170      76        215     101 
        36       2         81      27        126      52        171      77        216     102 
        37       2         82      27        127      52        172      77        217     102 
        38       3         83      28        128      53        173      78        218     103 
        39       3         84      28        129      53        174      78        219     103 
        40       4         85      29        130      54        175      79        220     104         
...
share|improve this question
3  
Think about how you would lay out n logical rows into k columns, and which data you need on each output row. There'll be some divisions and modulo operations somewhere. – Kerrek SB Sep 17 '11 at 21:48
    
+1 for being one of the few good homework questions on Stack Overflow. – user142019 Sep 17 '11 at 22:21
    
@Blake, Kerrek: You don't strictly need division/modulo. You could live with adding a known offset for each part of the table further to the right. Since the looping constants are already hard-coded, I don't see that detracting from the final solution. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 17 '11 at 22:31
    
@Blake: In your C2F loop, the number in the Celsius column depends on both its column and row. You're only calculating for the column. Suggestion: When you use nested loops, give the indexes meaningful names, like "row" and "col" instead of "i" and "j". If you do this to your code, you'll probably see what you're leaving out. – user732933 Sep 17 '11 at 22:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're already printing aligned columns, just not enough of them.

Start by printing out

Farenheit equivalents of Celsius temperatures:  
Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit Celsius Farenheit  
      0        32       0        32       0        32       0        32  
      1        33       1        33       1        33       1        33
    ...  

and think about what you'd have to change in your program to print the chart you want.

share|improve this answer

You're already printing out line-by line, and printing out 25 lines. Now think about the relationships each column has to the previous columns for each line:

baseC   toF(baseC)   baseC+numRows   toF(baseC+numRows)     baseC+(2*numRows) ...
baseC+1 toF(baseC+1) baseC+1+numRows toF(baseC+1+numRows) baseC+1+(2*numRows) ...

The number of rows is the same value you use to figure out how many times to loop.

The looping variable will take care of the baseC+X part.

Note: This is pseudo-code, so don't expect it to work directly :)

share|improve this answer

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