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I have a file containing a list of unix commands like "ls -la /etc/passwd". I want to iterate through this list of commands, and take appropriate action.

Currently, my code is something like:

#!/bin/bash
clear
for cmds in `cat /tmp/cmd`
do
        if [  $cmds ] ; then
                echo $cmds;
        fi
done

But, what I get is an output where the commands are broken up in different lines like

ls 
-la 
/etc/passwd
ls 
-la
/etc/shadow

and not

ls -la /etc/passwd
ls -la /etc/shadow

Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add this before your for loop:

IFS='
'

Or in Bash:

IFS=$'\n'

IFS contains a list of characters which are used to split input into fields; it defaults to including spaces, tabs, and linefeeds, which was why you were getting the incorrect behavior. Setting it to a newline will only split on newlines, which is what you want.

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Your solution partly worked, but all the n's were also used to split the input fields. And, it gave incorrect output like /etc/ssh/sshd_co fig svcs -a | grep etwork etstat -a | grep -i liste As you can see all n's were lost and incoorectly denoted new lines. –  Epitaph Apr 14 '09 at 1:13
    
Sorry. It appears that my version of Bash interprets \n in IFS specially; in generally, though, that won't work for putting a newline into a string. I've edited my answer to be more portable; you can put a literal newline in the string, or use Bash's C-style quotation. –  Brian Campbell Apr 14 '09 at 1:34

I believe you can also do this (surround your backticks with double-quotes):

"`cat /tmp/cmds`"

Maybe try something like this (not sure what your "if" is supposed to be checking - I modified it to make sure the $cmds var was not empty string):

#!/bin/bash

clear

for cmds in "`cat cmds.txt`"
do
    if [ "$cmds" != '' ]; then
        echo "$cmds"
    fi
done
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I got an error after putting in the double quotes /tmp/fo: line 6: [: too many arguments –  Epitaph Apr 14 '09 at 1:06
    
Added an example, not sure if this will work for you :) –  Andy White Apr 14 '09 at 1:35

If each line in the file is a complete command - no continuations over multiple lines - then you can use read:

while read cmd
do
    if [ -z "$cmd" ]
    then : Empty
    elif $cmd
    then : OK
    else : Oops
    fi
done < cmds.txt

Or, if you prefer linear construction and don't need anything from the sub-shell that the while loop represents in what follows, you can use:

cat cmds.txt |
while read cmd
do
    if [ -z "$cmd" ]
    then : Empty
    elif $cmd
    then : OK
    else : Oops
    fi
done

Note the careful use of quotes around the tested string. I still prefer to use an explicit '-z' operator; there are those who argue it is not 100% necessary. I still use single square brackets rather than double - mainly out of habit built up over 20+ years. Those who learned shell using bash or ksh often prefer the double square bracket operator instead.

Beware I/O redirections, of course.

Also, if you don't have anything to do in the various then and else clauses, you should simply feed cmds.txt to the shell:

sh cmds.txt

This is by far the most reliable way of dealing with multi-line commands.

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