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I'm trying to compare rows in a single table and figure out if "addr" and "zip" under the same id are same or different.

  id  |   addr   |   zip
------+----------+----------
  1   |   123    |   0000     
  1   |   123    |   0000    
  1   |   123    |   0001    
  2   |   222    |   1000    
  2   |   221    |   1000

So the result should say id 1 has valid addr and invalid zip id 2 has invalid addr and valid zip.

Any hint will be appreciated! Thank you!!

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1  
idea is to verify the functional dependency between id and (addr, zip)... –  zzs Sep 18 '11 at 0:19
1  
Your table has duplicate rows and therefore is not in first normal form. –  onedaywhen Sep 21 '11 at 12:55

3 Answers 3

The query...

SELECT id, COUNT(DISTINCT addr), COUNT(DISTINCT zip)
FROM YOUR_TABLE
GROUP BY id

...should give the following result on your example data...

1, 1, 2
2, 2, 1

The numbers in bold greater than 1 indicate "invalid" items.

If you want to actually filter on this, you can use HAVING clause, for example:

SELECT id, COUNT(DISTINCT addr) ADDR_COUNT, COUNT(DISTINCT zip) ZIP_COUNT
FROM YOUR_TABLE
GROUP BY id
HAVING ADDR_COUNT > 1 OR ZIP_COUNT > 1

May I suggest that if you don't actually want this kind of "mismatched" data in your database, redesign your data model so duplicates cannot happen in the first place. No duplicates, no mismatches!

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Which is exactly the solution I've come up with. Now the @OP will test your query and finally accept an answer since the standard SQL idiom will work with his Oracle instance and no-one downvoted you (I'm upvoting). I love stackoverflow, lol :D. –  Anthony Accioly Sep 18 '11 at 0:34
    
@Anthony For what it's worth, I later noticed your answer and upvoted you, realizing you got there first! –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 18 '11 at 0:48
    
Thanks for the acknowledgment :D. –  Anthony Accioly Sep 18 '11 at 0:50

Group by id. Select id, COUNT(DISTINCT addr) and COUNT(DISTINCT zip) columns. Filter the rows where the number of distinct address or zips > 1.
This will give you the ids with inconsistent duplicate data.

Example:

SELECT id, COUNT(DISTINCT addr) nAddr, COUNT(DISTINCT zip) nZip
FROM [mytable]
GROUP BY id
HAVING nAddr > 1 OR nZip > 1

Cheers,

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-1 using [tablename] is TSQL syntax. And you cannot do a where on a aggregate column. That's what's having is for. Also you forgot a distinct –  Johan Sep 17 '11 at 23:50
    
You are right about distinct and having. It is fixed. About TSQL, I'm not forced to couple with non standard SQL syntax. If it is not clear that [my table] should be replaced by the actual table name before, I'm stating it now. –  Anthony Accioly Sep 18 '11 at 0:06
SELECT id
       , CASE s.addrcount 
         WHEN 1 THEN 'valid' 
         ELSE 'invalid' END as addrok
       , CASE s.zipcount 
         WHEN 1 THEN 'valid'
         ELSE 'invalid' END as zipok
FROM 
(
  SELECT id
         , count(distinct addr) as addrcount
         , count(distinct zip) as zipcount
  FROM table1
  GROUP BY id
) as s
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help! Is "s.addrcount" supposed to be this way, or is it count(s.addr)? –  zzs Sep 17 '11 at 23:54
    
Either way, i'm getting 00907. 00000 - "missing right parenthesis" on this area :/ –  zzs Sep 17 '11 at 23:54
    
Is "s.addrcount" supposed to be this way: YES –  Johan Sep 18 '11 at 0:51
    
Do you mean you can't use COUNTs in CASEs directly? Like … CASE COUNT(DISTINCT addr) WHEN 1 THEN … ELSE … END AS whatever …? –  Andriy M Sep 18 '11 at 1:25
    
@Andriy, No you cannot use aggregate functions in case .. when because the aggregate function combines values from multiple rows and case .. when is evaluated on a row by row bases. This is why you need the subselect. –  Johan Sep 18 '11 at 9:27

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