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I have done some benchmark regarding List.Contains, Array.Contains, IEnumerable.Contains, ICollection.Contains and IList.Contains.

The results are:

array pure 00:00:45.0052754 // 45 sec, slow
array as IList 00:00:02.7900305
array as IEnumerable 00:00:46.5871087 // 45 sec, slow
array as ICollection 00:00:02.7449889
list pure 00:00:01.9907563
list as IList 00:00:02.6626009
list as IEnumerable 00:00:02.9541950
list as ICollection 00:00:02.3341203

As I find out that it would be very slow if call Array.Contains directly (which is equivalent to call IEnumerable)

Also I feel it is strange that MSDN array page doesn't have contains method listed in the extension method section.

Sample code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace arrayList
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
            Int64 n = 100000000;
            Int64[] myarray = new Int64[] { 1, 2, 3 };
            List<Int64> mylist = new List<Int64>(myarray);
            watch.Start();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = myarray.Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("array pure {0}", watch.Elapsed);

            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (myarray as IList<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("array as IList {0}",watch.Elapsed);

            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (myarray as IEnumerable<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("array as IEnumerable {0}",watch.Elapsed);
            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (myarray as ICollection<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("array as ICollection {0}",watch.Elapsed);

            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = mylist.Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("list pure {0}", watch.Elapsed);

            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (mylist as IList<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("list as IList {0}", watch.Elapsed);

            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (mylist as IEnumerable<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("list as IEnumerable {0}", watch.Elapsed);
            watch.Restart();
            for (Int64 j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {

                bool i = (mylist as ICollection<Int64>).Contains(2);

            }
            watch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("list as ICollection {0}", watch.Elapsed);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
You should also try this experiment with bigger arrays and single calls. Calling Contains repeatedly is opposite of the usage typically found in apps I write. If you big-O analyzed these implementations, you'd be testing "the constant" (O(n) = mn + k) rather than "the coefficient" (O(n) = m n + k) of a linear function... –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 18 '11 at 0:49
    
You never know when the Garbage Collector is called.... Try moving pure array and IEnumerable stopwatch somewhere else in the program and running it. Also you can call Garbage collection explicitly to make it more interesting. since the call to GC at random time may make you think that particular collection is slow. –  MS Stp Sep 18 '11 at 0:56
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham: in my apps the array size doesn't matter (small), only the number of calls matters (i know it is quite uncommon), so in my case O(n) has its n as the number of calls. –  colinfang Sep 18 '11 at 0:59
1  
I just tried it myself by changing position and calling GC explicitly as well so yes it is not GC issue. –  MS Stp Sep 18 '11 at 1:27
1  
@colinfang The MSDN documentation doesn't contain a reference to Contains because the implementation of the IEnumerable<T> interface is applied at runtime so the documentation build tools don't see it. (See the "Important" note in the Remarks section (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.array.aspx). –  Scott Dorman Sep 18 '11 at 2:46

3 Answers 3

The way you are timing these are not sufficient. You need significantly larger inputs to get times representative of the algorithms. Yes Contains() will be slower than a simple linear search (something you've omitted) but the different calls are not going to have the times as you've shown. You're likely to not see any variation between the calls to Contains() when cast to the different types as in all likelihood, we're calling the same implementation for all of them.

Try this code for size:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const int iterations = 1000000;
            const long target = 7192;
            var arr = Enumerable.Range(0, 10000).Select(i => (long)i).ToArray();
            var list = arr.ToList();

            bool result;

            var arr0 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = LinearSearchArr(arr, target);
            }
            arr0.Stop();

            var arr1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                // actually Enumerable.Contains()
                result = arr.Contains(target);
            }
            arr1.Stop();

            var arr2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((IList<long>)arr).Contains(target);
            }
            arr2.Stop();

            var arr3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((IEnumerable<long>)arr).Contains(target);
            }
            arr3.Stop();

            var arr4 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((ICollection<long>)arr).Contains(target);
            }
            arr4.Stop();

            var list0 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = LinearSearchList(list, target);
            }
            list0.Stop();

            var list1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = list.Contains(target);
            }
            list1.Stop();

            var list2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((IList<long>)list).Contains(target);
            }
            list2.Stop();

            var list3 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((IEnumerable<long>)list).Contains(target);
            }
            list3.Stop();

            var list4 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
            {
                result = ((ICollection<long>)list).Contains(target);
            }
            list4.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("array linear {0} ({1})", arr0.Elapsed, arr0.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("array pure {0} ({1})", arr1.Elapsed, arr1.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("array as IList {0} ({1})", arr2.Elapsed, arr2.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("array as IEnumerable {0} ({1})", arr3.Elapsed, arr3.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("array as ICollection {0} ({1})", arr4.Elapsed, arr4.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("list linear {0} ({1})", list0.Elapsed, list0.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("list pure {0} ({1})", list1.Elapsed, list1.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("list as IList {0} ({1})", list2.Elapsed, list2.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("list as IEnumerable {0} ({1})", list3.Elapsed, list3.ElapsedTicks);
            Console.WriteLine("list as ICollection {0} ({1})", list4.Elapsed, list4.ElapsedTicks);
        }

        static bool LinearSearchArr(long[] arr, long target)
        {
            for (var i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
            {
                if (arr[i] == target)
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }

        static bool LinearSearchList(List<long> list, long target)
        {
            for (var i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
            {
                if (list[i] == target)
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Specs:
Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 @ 2.83GHz
4x1GiB Corsair Dominator DDR2 1066 (PC2-8500)

Default .NET 4.0 Console App release build targeting x64:

array linear 00:00:07.7268891 (21379939)
array pure 00:00:12.1703848 (33674883)
array as IList 00:00:12.1764948 (33691789)
array as IEnumerable 00:00:12.5377771 (34691440)
array as ICollection 00:00:12.1827855 (33709195)
list linear 00:00:17.9288343 (49608242)
list pure 00:00:25.8427338 (71505630)
list as IList 00:00:25.8678260 (71575059)
list as IEnumerable 00:00:25.8500101 (71525763)
list as ICollection 00:00:25.8423424 (71504547)
share|improve this answer
    
it surprises me that linearsearch runs faster than contains for large array/list size. In addition, the reason why I set up such a "bizarre" test is because in one of my app I focus on massive calls on simple operations, and the result behaved weird... I know it is not a standard benchmark, as I should rename it as MY particular case studies. –  colinfang Sep 18 '11 at 5:45
    
Well what you should get out of this is that you need large inputs to get more accurate results. –  Jeff Mercado Sep 18 '11 at 6:39

Guess: IList/List use ICollection.Contains wich directly goes through elements in the collection using index.

Array and IEnumerable versions use IEnumerable.Contains that requires creation of enumrator and run genreic iteration code (like MoveNext calls).

share|improve this answer
1  
Just done a profiling, the internal implementations differ much between array and list. Also in terms of array, there is a lot of time spent on "polymoph" IEnumerable.Contains to SZArrayHelp.Contains –  colinfang Sep 18 '11 at 1:14

Make sure you use the results of the Contains method somehow in your code so that it doesn't optimise that away. I am guessing in one situation it can use a hashtable, and in the others it has to do linear search. Either that or it is just not running your loop as it doesn't do anything.

Either way, who is ever going to write code that casts and then runs contains a million times...

share|improve this answer
    
The code that doesn't actually cast runs slower (myarray.Contains(2) and (myarray as IEnumerable<T>).Contains(2)). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 18 '11 at 2:27

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