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I am working on a static class to provide random values for my program, but there are some issues with implementing the equivalent of the Random.Next(int maxValue) functionality:

public class CRandom {
    static readonly byte[] randomSet;
    static readonly Func<int> closedIndex; 
    static CRandom() {
        randomSet = new byte[60000000];
        closedIndex = _ClosedIndex(0); 
        RNGCryptoServiceProvider Gen = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
        Gen.GetBytes(randomSet);
    }
    public static int Next() {
        int index = closedIndex();
        return Convert.ToInt32(randomSet[index]);
    }
    public static int Next(int maxValue) {
        int index = closedIndex();
        byte[] remainingSet = randomSet.Skip(index + 1).ToArray();
        byte next = remainingSet.First(x => Convert.ToInt32(x) < maxValue); 
        return Convert.ToInt32(next);
    }
    public static Func<int> _ClosedIndex(int seed) {
        // seed is the initial value
        int _index = seed - 1; 
        Func<int> del = new Func<int>(() =>
        {  // always returns auto-incremented value
            _index++; 
            return _index; 
        });
        return del; 
    }
}

Basically what it does is fill up a static/readonly byte array of random values and in the case of the Next(maxValue) method just gets the next value thats in range but hasn't been used before. However trying out Next(100) in a loop is giving these results, which obviously aren't random:

53 20 20 34 34 73 73 73 73

This is also a very slow way of doing it. I'm sure there is a better way but I don't know quite how Random.Next() works under the hood.

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Why do the numbers need to be secure? –  SLaks Sep 18 '11 at 3:13
2  
Yes, I can imagine that creating a fresh copy of your 60 MB of randomness each time you want to read out one byte is "very slow". What on earth are you trying to achieve with all that indirection?? –  Henning Makholm Sep 18 '11 at 3:18
    
I need to create a simulated coin toss where I can control the bias of the coin. Using the default Random() class doesnt seem to work, the coin doesn't reflect the bias correctly at all. I thought you had to create an array of random values then iterate through it, but I see thats not how it really works. –  Sean Thoman Sep 18 '11 at 3:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

MSDN Magazine has a very detailed article about this exact topic.
It's more complicated than you think.

He wrote the following class; however, read the article for important notes about randomness.

public class CryptoRandom : Random
{
    private RNGCryptoServiceProvider _rng =
        new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
    private byte[] _uint32Buffer = new byte[4];

    public CryptoRandom() { }
    public CryptoRandom(Int32 ignoredSeed) { }

    public override Int32 Next()
    {
        _rng.GetBytes(_uint32Buffer);
        return BitConverter.ToInt32(_uint32Buffer, 0) & 0x7FFFFFFF;
    }

    public override Int32 Next(Int32 maxValue)
    {
        if (maxValue < 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("maxValue");
        return Next(0, maxValue);
    }

    public override Int32 Next(Int32 minValue, Int32 maxValue)
    {
        if (minValue > maxValue) 
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("minValue");
        if (minValue == maxValue) return minValue;
        Int64 diff = maxValue - minValue;
        while (true)
        {
            _rng.GetBytes(_uint32Buffer);
            UInt32 rand = BitConverter.ToUInt32(_uint32Buffer, 0);

            Int64 max = (1 + (Int64)UInt32.MaxValue);
            Int64 remainder = max % diff;
            if (rand < max - remainder)
            {
                return (Int32)(minValue + (rand % diff));
            }
        }
    }

    public override double NextDouble()
    {
        _rng.GetBytes(_uint32Buffer);
        UInt32 rand = BitConverter.ToUInt32(_uint32Buffer, 0);
        return rand / (1.0 + UInt32.MaxValue);
    }

    public override void NextBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        if (buffer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("buffer");
        _rng.GetBytes(buffer);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Also realized a byte[] won't really do since an unsigned int will be limited to 0-255.. –  Sean Thoman Sep 18 '11 at 3:13

Try my solution:

public sealed class SecureRandom : Random {

    private readonly RandomNumberGenerator _rng;

    public SecureRandom() {
        _rng = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();            
    }

    public SecureRandom(int seed) {
        var rgb = BitConverter.GetBytes(seed);
        _rng = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider(rgb);
    }

    public override int Next() {
        var data = new byte[sizeof (int)];
        _rng.GetBytes(data);
        return BitConverter.ToInt32(data, 0) & (int.MaxValue - 1);
    }

    public override int Next(int maxValue) {            
        return Next(0, maxValue);
    }

    public override int Next(int minValue, int maxValue) {
        if (minValue > maxValue) {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("minValue", minValue, "minValue must be less than or equals to maxValue");
        }            
        return (int) Math.Floor(minValue + (maxValue - minValue) * NextDouble());
    }

    public override double NextDouble() {
        var data = new byte[sizeof (uint)];
        _rng.GetBytes(data);
        var randUint = BitConverter.ToUInt32(data, 0);
        return randUint / (uint.MaxValue + 1.0);
    }

    public override void NextBytes(byte[] data) {
        _rng.GetBytes(data);
    }        

    public override string ToString() {
        return _rng.ToString();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        return _rng.Equals(obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
        return _rng.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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