Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running through the MDN tutorials, using the drawImage method for slicing an image. The stripped down page code looks like:

  <html>
  <head>
    <script type="application/x-javascript">
    function draw() {
           var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
           ctx.drawImage(document.getElementById('frame'),0,0);
           ctx.drawImage(document.getElementById('source'),33,71,104,124,21,20,87,104);
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body onload="draw();">
      <canvas id="canvas" width="150" height="150"></canvas>
      <img id="source" src="images/rhino.jpg" width="300" height="227" alt="">
      <img id="frame" src="images/picture_frame.png" width="132" height="150" alt="">
  </body>
</html>

When the full version is run from the MDN website, it works as expected. When copied to my local machine and loaded from a "file:///" url (with correct relative pathing for images), this throws an INDEX_SIZE_ERR on the drawImage...'source' line.

Images load as expected through the img tags.

Assigning the document.getElementById('source') to a variable and passing that variable to drawImage shows that the variable is non-null and has classWidth of 300 (through a simple alert), and still throws the error.

The ctx.drawImage(document.getElementById('frame'),0,0); line does draw to the canvas correctly.

Why is my local machine behaving differently than the web version? Security restrictions? (Newbie here, apologies if the answer is simple.)

share|improve this question
1  
are images same on your server and locally ? –  c69 Sep 18 '11 at 8:11
    
@c69: Yes, identical, copied from the MDN site. –  Joe Zoller Sep 18 '11 at 13:20
    
Images must be loaded in the same domain over HTTP. Local file system is NOT supported. If you run this locally there’s no domain. –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 18 '11 at 13:45
    
@Caspar Kleijne: Hrm. Reversing the 'source' and 'frame' line order, the 'frame' line does render the picture frame image on the canvas, though. I'm trying to understand... why would it work for one call of drawImage, but not the other? Thanks! –  Joe Zoller Sep 18 '11 at 13:59
    
since document.getElementById('source') is null or 0 by 0 pixels guess. –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 18 '11 at 14:02
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're receiving the INDEX_SIZE_ERR because you are calling drawImage() with parameters that are either negative or are outside the bounds of your data. In this case, we can rule out negative values.

Instead, you are probably seeing the error because you're asking for information outside the dimensions of your source image data. When you specify both the source and destination coordinates and dimensions (as you are doing here), you are allowed to pass values outside the bounds of the destination dimensions (both positive and negative). Where you can run into trouble is with the source values.

In your case, I think what's happening is that your source image is actually not 300px by 227px, despite what you denote in the CSS. Even though the image may be displayed that large in your browser, the actual number of pixels stored in the image object that's loaded into the DOM is smaller. So, even though your call to drawImage() has valid parameters given the sizing you specified for each DOM element, you are asking for pixels 33 -> 137 in the x dimension and pixels 71 -> 195 in the y dimension. One (or both) of these ranges exceeds the dimensions of your source image. Double check the actual size of your source image.

As for why you're experiencing different behavior between local and network execution, you're probably running into issues when the images are requested. Aside from the fact that you typically won't be able to manipulate canvas elements locally (unless you setup a special dev environment or manually configure your browser), images still have to be "downloaded" to your browser regardless of their location. Image acquisition in a browser is done asynchronously, so given the code you have now you cannot be guaranteed when the draw() function is called that both (or either) of the images are available in memory.

Instead, what you should be doing is using the onload callback function built into image elements. In your case, since you have two images, you would need to maintain a flag to determine when both images are loaded. You might try something like this:

<html>
<head>
<script type="application/x-javascript">
    var images_loaded = 0;

    function imageLoaded() {
        ++images_loaded;

        if (images_loaded == 2) {
            draw(); 
        }
    }

    function draw() {
        var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
        ctx.drawImage(document.getElementById('frame'),0,0);
        ctx.drawImage(document.getElementById('source'),33,71,104,124,21,20,87,104);
    }
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <canvas id="canvas" width="150" height="150"></canvas>
    <img id="source" onload="imageLoaded();" src="images/rhino.jpg" width="300" height="227" alt="">
    <img id="frame" onload="imageLoaded();" src="images/picture_frame.png" width="132" height="150" alt="">
</body>
</html>

Note that the issue with your parameters in the call to drawImage() for the rhino still remains in the above example; I don't know what the dimensions of your rhino.jpg image are, so I can't recommend a correction.

share|improve this answer
    
It was indeed the picture size that was the issue. The load was occurring just fine. Thanks so much for your help, this has been great for learning about the mechanics of the loading model and debuggers. –  Joe Zoller Sep 29 '11 at 18:52
    
@JoeZoller No problem! I'm glad we were able to sort the problem out. :) –  Xenethyl Sep 29 '11 at 19:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.