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I am wondering if someone could clarify the following from Apples Core Data documentation:

Changes are not reflected until after the controller’s managed object context has received a processPendingChanges message. Therefore, if you change the value of a managed object’s attribute so that its location in a fetched results controller’s results set would change, its index as reported by the controller would typically not change until the end of the current event cycle (when processPendingChanges is invoked). For example, the following code fragment would log “same”:

NSFetchedResultsController *frc = <#A fetched results controller#>;
NSManagedObject *managedObject = <#A managed object in frc's fetchedObjects array#>;
NSIndexPath *beforeIndexPath = [frc indexPathForObject:managedObject];
[managedObject setSortKeyAttribute:
                  <#A new value that changes managedObject's position in frc's fetchedObjects array#>;
NSIndexPath *afterIndexPath = [frc indexPathForObject:managedObject];
if ([beforeIndexPath compare:afterIndexPath] == NSOrderedSame) {
    NSLog(@"same");
}

What exactly does "would typically not change until the end of the current event cycle" mean? I have this situation in my code but am not really sure if I can 100% rely on my indexes staying the same until I explicitely preform a save on my managed object context. Could the above code be modified, without performing a save to the context, such that it doesn't log "same"?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

not really sure if I can 100% rely on my indexes staying the same until I explicitely preform a save on my managed object context.

I wouldn't. The "current event cycle" is the current iteration of the run loop.

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+1 The runloop processes so fast (unless you block it) that it's effects in the UI cannot be discerned by the user. –  TechZen Sep 18 '11 at 14:19
    
I suppose i'm confused with why the documentation goes on to provide a code sample that says it should work if it's not something that should be done. If I have similar code in the UITableView delegate moveRowAtIndexPath will that block the run loop until completion? –  Adam S. Sep 18 '11 at 14:53
    
I haven't looked up that example in the docs, but I'd say that it's just demonstrating the point, not something that "should work" or "shouldn't be done." The whole thing is just a caution: if you change frc's sort key, the order of the results doesn't change until the run loop completes. –  Caleb Sep 18 '11 at 15:02

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