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I am trying to make a very simple MFC OpenGL tutorial.
There is a sphere. And the spere is the source of light(like sun). And there is two triangle. According to movement of the spere, I want to have the triangles lightend.
But When I move the sphere, the surface of the triangle changed only for the first time.
Next movement of the sphere don't change the surface the the triangle.

How to keep trace of the light position?
This is the keyborad handler function.

void CView::OnKeyDown(UINT nChar, UINT nRepCnt, UINT nFlags)
{
    if (nChar == VK_UP)
    {
        m.x += 0.1f;
    }
    else if (nChar == VK_DOWN)
    {
        m.y -= 0.1f;
    }
    else if (nChar == VK_LEFT)
    {
        m.x -= 0.1f;
    }
    else if (nChar == VK_RIGHT)
    {
        m.x += 0.1f;
    }
    setGL();
    DrawGL();
    CView::OnKeyDown(nChar, nRepCnt, nFlags);
}  

And these are the functions which called by keyboard function.

void CView::setGL(GLvoid)           
{
    glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.5f);       
    glClearDepth(1.0f); 
    glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);    
    glDepthFunc(GL_LEQUAL);             
    glHint(GL_PERSPECTIVE_CORRECTION_HINT, GL_NICEST);

    // light source configuration ##################
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    gluLookAt(0.f,0.f,1.f, 0.f,0.f,0.f, 0.f,1.f,0.f);

    GLfloat light0_diffuse[] = {0.5, 0.5, 1.0};
    GLfloat light0_specular[] = {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0};
    GLfloat light0_spot_direction[] = {1,1,1,0};

    GLfloat light1_diffuse[] = {1.0f, 0.3f, 0.3f};
    GLfloat light1_specular[] = {1.0f, 0.8f, 0.8f, 1.0f};
    GLfloat light1_shiniess[] = {50.0};
    GLfloat light1_pos[] = {m.x, m.y, m.z};

    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_DIFFUSE, light0_diffuse);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPECULAR, light0_specular);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPOT_DIRECTION, light0_spot_direction);

    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_DIFFUSE, light1_diffuse);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_SPECULAR, light1_specular);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_SHININESS, light1_shiniess);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_POSITION, light1_pos);

    glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
    glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
    glEnable(GL_LIGHT1);
}

void CView::DrawGL(void)                
{
    // clear screen and depth buffer
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); 
    glLoadIdentity();
    // camera view configuration 
    gluLookAt(0.0f,0.0f,1.0f, 0.0f,0.0f,0.0f, 0.0f,1.0f,0.0f);

    // draw 
    //glColor3f(1.f, 1.f, 1.f);
    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(m.x, m.y, m.z);
    glutSolidSphere(0.25f, 120, 120);

    glPopMatrix();
    glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
    glVertex3f(-0.5f, 0.5f, -0.5f);
    glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);
    glVertex3f(-1.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);

    m.calculateNormal(-0.5f, 0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f, -1.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);
    glNormal3f(m.normalX, m.normalY, m.normalZ);

    glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
    glVertex3f(0.5f, 0.5f, -1.0f);
    glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);
    glVertex3f(1.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);

    m.calculateNormal(0.5f, 0.5f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);
    glNormal3f(m.normalX, m.normalY, m.normalZ);

    glEnd();

    // swap buffer
    SwapBuffers(m_hDC);
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should never place drawing calls in a input event handler. That's your main problem. The other problem is – so it seems – that you confuse OpenGL for a scene graph.

OpenGL is a drawing API with no recollection of a scene, whatsoever. In your input handler you set some variables, issue a redraw event and then in the drawing event handler render from those variables. OpenGL being a state machine drawing API also means, that there is no explicit initialization phase. A function like setGL makes no sense whatsoever. What you do in setGL actually belongs into the drawing function. This includes setting the viewport and the projection matrix!

void CView::drawGL(GLvoid)           
{
    glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 0.5f);       
    glClearDepth(1.0f); 
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT); 

    glViewport(…);
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
        set_projection_matrix(…);    

    // light source configuration ##################
    glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
    glLoadIdentity(); // gluLookAt expects to work from a identity matrix.
    gluLookAt(0.f,0.f,1.f, 0.f,0.f,0.f, 0.f,1.f,0.f);

    GLfloat light0_diffuse[] = {0.5, 0.5, 1.0};
    GLfloat light0_specular[] = {1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0};
    GLfloat light0_spot_direction[] = {1,1,1,0};

    GLfloat light1_diffuse[] = {1.0f, 0.3f, 0.3f};
    GLfloat light1_specular[] = {1.0f, 0.8f, 0.8f, 1.0f};
    GLfloat light1_shiniess[] = {50.0};
    GLfloat light1_pos[] = {m.x, m.y, m.z};

    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_DIFFUSE, light0_diffuse);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPECULAR, light0_specular);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_SPOT_DIRECTION, light0_spot_direction);

    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_DIFFUSE, light1_diffuse);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_SPECULAR, light1_specular);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_SHININESS, light1_shiniess);
    glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_POSITION, light1_pos);

    glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
    glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
    glEnable(GL_LIGHT1);

    glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
    glDepthFunc(GL_LEQUAL);

    // draw 
    glColor3f(1.f, 1.f, 1.f);
    glPushMatrix();
    glTranslatef(m.x, m.y, m.z);
    glutSolidSphere(0.25f, 120, 120);
    glPopMatrix();

    glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
    glVertex3f(-0.5f, 0.5f, -0.5f);
    glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);
    glVertex3f(-1.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);

    m.calculateNormal(-0.5f, 0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f, -1.0f, 0.0f, -0.5f);
    glNormal3f(m.normalX, m.normalY, m.normalZ);

    glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
    glVertex3f(0.5f, 0.5f, -1.0f);
    glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);
    glVertex3f(1.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);

    m.calculateNormal(0.5f, 0.5f, -1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, -1.0f);
    glNormal3f(m.normalX, m.normalY, m.normalZ);
    glEnd();

    // swap buffer
    SwapBuffers(m_hDC);
}

The calls to glLight… happen in the context of the currently set state (most importantly for the lights is the modelview matrix). The light positions are multiplied by the modelview matrix. If using gluLookAt, which you do, the calls to glLightfv(GL_LIGHT<n>, GL_POSITION, …) must happen after gluLookAt and before drawing the illuminated geometry.

share|improve this answer
    
Quote You should never place drawing calls in a input event handler. But How to notify the change of the position of light to DrawGL method? –  manutd Sep 19 '11 at 13:23
    
@manutd: You store the new light positions in a variable and apply them in the next drawing interation. Remember: OpenGL is not a scene graph, i.e. it doesn't build some kind of scene internally. You send it geometry, and OpenGL draws it as it comes, then forgets about it. Light positions are just some state relevant during drawing. Lights are not some scene data OpenGL manages for you. Lights are not much different than selecting line width, or brush in a drawing program. –  datenwolf Sep 19 '11 at 14:00
    
Thanks for reply. But I have another question. Quote "You should never place drawing calls in a input event handler." Then where I should place the drawing method? thanks again. –  manutd Sep 19 '11 at 14:57
1  
In MFC programs you do it from the WM_PAINT handler, which is CWnd::OnPaint. If your program plays animation you should also draw from the idle handler, CApp::OnIdle, call the OpenGL windows drawing function; add calls to wglMakeCurrent at the beginning of the drawing function, too. –  datenwolf Sep 19 '11 at 15:51
    
I figure it out by using point light. I plus GLfloat light1_pos[]'s 4th argument. GLfloat light1_pos[] = {m.x, m.y, m.z, 1.0}; like this. And everything seems to be fine. However I still placed drawing call in a input event hadler. But it works well. Why do you suggest that do not place drawing calls in a input event handler? Any meaningful intent? Please Tell Me. Thanks –  manutd Sep 20 '11 at 12:22
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void CView::OnKeyDown(UINT nChar, UINT nRepCnt, UINT nFlags)
{
    ...
    CView::OnKeyDown(nChar, nRepCnt, nFlags);
}  

How isn't that an infinite recursive call? Doesn't your compiler warn you about this?

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I think you are right. This would explain why it works only once. –  Heisenbug Sep 18 '11 at 7:53
1  
As @Heisenbug pointed out earlier, you shouldn't be calling glBegin twice (or perhaps you are missing a glEnd). The second call will be ignored, but its a problem waiting to arise... –  K-ballo Sep 18 '11 at 7:58
    
@K-ballo No. Complier didn't complain about that. I don't know why CView::OnKeyDown(nChar, nRepCnt, nFlags); is there. It is automatically made –  manutd Sep 18 '11 at 8:02
1  
@manutd: Well if that's your real code, then I don't see how it could work. You realize that calling OnKeyDown results in OnKeyDown being invoked, which in turn invokes OnKeyDown that will ... well you get the point. –  K-ballo Sep 18 '11 at 8:08
    
@K-ballo I fixed that. I call glbegin only once. But the problem still remains. –  manutd Sep 18 '11 at 8:11
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