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I know a few ways how to check this. regex,int.parse,tryparse,looping.

can anyone tell me what is the fastest way to check?

the need is to only CHECK no need to actually parse.

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1  
w/o just measuring I would guess int.tryparse –  kenny Sep 18 '11 at 11:13
    
Probably a loop written in assembly that reads native-word-sized chunks of data from the string into a register and then performs a range-check on each byte in the register. –  aroth Sep 18 '11 at 11:14
4  
simply return str.All(Char.IsDigit); –  Mohsen Oct 23 '13 at 5:45
1  
int.TryParse does not check if string contains only digits! Strings like " -13 " (with minus and spaces) will be parsed successfully. –  aleyush May 6 at 7:28
    
What do you mean by digits? Any unicode character that's considered a digit, or only the ten ASCII digits? –  CodesInChaos Dec 8 at 10:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 74 down vote accepted
bool IsDigitsOnly(string str)

{
  foreach (char c in str)
  {
    if (c < '0' || c > '9')
      return false;
  }

  return true;
}

Will probably be the fastest way to do it.

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1  
+1: IMO, this is the fastest way to check if the string has only digits in C# –  digEmAll Sep 18 '11 at 11:31
4  
There's also char.IsDigit() –  Keith Feb 5 '13 at 8:14
6  
@Keith IsDigit returns true for about three-hundred more characters. Including full width decimal digits 0123... (common in China and Japan) and digits from other cultures e.g. ০১২௧௨௩௪꘤꘥꘦꘧꘨ and plenty more. –  CodesInChaos Sep 18 '13 at 9:08
6  
if anyone cares, this can certainly be reduced to a one-liner -> return str.All(c => c >= '0' && c <= '9'); –  Jonesy Feb 6 at 14:07
1  
You could simply do this too: return str.All(char.IsDigit);. Hooray for method groups! –  icemanind Aug 27 at 18:10

Here's some benchmarks based on 1000000 parses of the same string:

Updated for release stats:

IsDigitsOnly: 384588
TryParse:     639583
Regex:        1329571

Here's the code, looks like IsDigitsOnly is faster:

class Program
{
    private static Regex regex = new Regex("^[0-9]+$", RegexOptions.Compiled);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        string test = int.MaxValue.ToString();
        int value;

        watch.Start();
        for(int i=0; i< 1000000; i++)
        {
            int.TryParse(test, out value);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("TryParse: "+watch.ElapsedTicks);

        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            IsDigitsOnly(test);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("IsDigitsOnly: " + watch.ElapsedTicks);

        watch.Reset();
        watch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            regex.IsMatch(test);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Regex: " + watch.ElapsedTicks);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static bool IsDigitsOnly(string str)
    {
        foreach (char c in str)
        {
            if (c < '0' || c > '9')
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }
}

Of course it's worth noting that TryParse does allow leading/trailing whitespace as well as culture specific symbols. It's also limited on length of string.

share|improve this answer
    
Parsing a number definitely takes more time than just checking each digit, as you're performing base conversion. –  bdares Sep 18 '11 at 11:21
    
Just benched marked it, TryParse is quicker. –  TheCodeKing Sep 18 '11 at 11:40
    
@TheCodeKing: Please post your full benchmarking code. –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '11 at 11:42
1  
1000 parses of the same string should take almost no time at all, by the way, well under the time where natural noise renders the results insignificant. I'd expect to have to parse it a million times to get useful timings. –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '11 at 11:46
3  
Ooh, with /o+ on compilation, it's now over 5 times faster than int.TryParse. Just to check, you're not running in the debugger are you? –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '11 at 12:13

If you are concerned about performance, use neither int.TryParse nor Regex - write your own (simple) function (DigitsOnly or DigitsOnly2 below, but not DigitsOnly3 - LINQ seems to incur a significant overhead).

Also, be aware that int.TryParse will fail if the string is too long to "fit" into int.

This simple benchmark...

class Program {

    static bool DigitsOnly(string s) {
        int len = s.Length;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
            char c = s[i];
            if (c < '0' || c > '9')
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    static bool DigitsOnly2(string s) {
        foreach (char c in s) {
            if (c < '0' || c > '9')
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    static bool DigitsOnly3(string s) {
        return s.All(c => c >= '0' && c <= '9');
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {

        const string s1 = "916734184";
        const string s2 = "916734a84";

        const int iterations = 1000000;
        var sw = new Stopwatch();

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0 ; i < iterations; ++i) {
            bool success = DigitsOnly(s1);
            bool failure = DigitsOnly(s2);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("DigitsOnly: {0}", sw.Elapsed));

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            bool success = DigitsOnly2(s1);
            bool failure = DigitsOnly2(s2);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("DigitsOnly2: {0}", sw.Elapsed));

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            bool success = DigitsOnly3(s1);
            bool failure = DigitsOnly3(s2);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("DigitsOnly3: {0}", sw.Elapsed));

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            int dummy;
            bool success = int.TryParse(s1, out dummy);
            bool failure = int.TryParse(s2, out dummy);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("int.TryParse: {0}", sw.Elapsed));

        sw.Restart();
        var regex = new Regex("^[0-9]+$", RegexOptions.Compiled);
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            bool success = regex.IsMatch(s1);
            bool failure = regex.IsMatch(s2);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Regex.IsMatch: {0}", sw.Elapsed));

    }

}

...produces the following result...

DigitsOnly: 00:00:00.0346094
DigitsOnly2: 00:00:00.0365220
DigitsOnly3: 00:00:00.2669425
int.TryParse: 00:00:00.3405548
Regex.IsMatch: 00:00:00.7017648
share|improve this answer

The char already has an IsDigit(char c) which does this:

 public static bool IsDigit(char c)
    {
      if (!char.IsLatin1(c))
        return CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(c) == UnicodeCategory.DecimalDigitNumber;
      if ((int) c >= 48)
        return (int) c <= 57;
      else
        return false;
    }

You can simply do this:

var theString = "839278";
bool digitsOnly = theString.All(char.IsDigit);
share|improve this answer
    
If you cared to check for Unicode digits you shouldn't have cast a char to a int just because it's bad code, even for faster code. –  user823959 Sep 17 '13 at 17:05
    
@user823959: I am not sure what you mean. Char.IsDigit is part of the mscorelib: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0t641e58.aspx –  Florian Gerhardt Sep 18 '13 at 11:38
    
Gerhard sorry, my mistake. –  user823959 Sep 21 '13 at 19:41
    
This is more concise than looping, but on my machine, over a million iterations, for loop is always faster by ~1.5 times –  mishrsud Nov 13 at 6:07

This should work:

Regex.IsMatch("124", "^[0-9]+$", RegexOptions.Compiled)

int.Parse or int.TryParse won't always work, because the string might contain more digits that an int can hold.

If you are going to do this check more than once it is useful to use a compiled regex - it takes more time the first time, but is much faster after that.

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1  
this is wrong, it returns true if theres even one digit. though the complied idea is awesome. –  Nahum Litvin Sep 18 '11 at 11:34
    
This is by far the slowest method, but is the best solution based on unknown size of string. As mentioned the regex also needs a tweak. –  TheCodeKing Sep 18 '11 at 11:37

You can do this in a one line LINQ statement. OK, I realise this is not necessarily the fastest, so doesn't technically answer the question, but it's probably the easiest to write:

str.All(c => c >= '0' && c <= '9')
share|improve this answer
    
str.All(char.IsDigit) is even easier to write, but of course not equivalent to your code. –  CodesInChaos Sep 17 '13 at 17:01
    
I tried to test this: pastebin.com/PuWBp9n1 on release no debugger of course... and it seems WAYYYY faster. @Jon Skeet can you provide some insight? str.All(c => c >= '0' && c <= '9') seems WAY faster than IsDigit –  Nahum Litvin Sep 18 '13 at 6:19
1  
@NahumLitvin IsDigit supports unicode. So depending on which time-memory trade-offs Microsoft chose when implementing it, the check might be quite expensive. I assume that it forwards to native code, that transition can be quite expensive as well. –  CodesInChaos Sep 18 '13 at 9:15
    
@CodesInChaos when you said it was "not equivalent to my code" I went to check what else might match, and it turns out that digits in other locales (e.g. Arabic) would match in your version. I guess it is something that OP would need to consider, whether such digits are valid or not. When doing int.TryParse, I think that would not accept strings containing such characters. –  Stephen Holt Sep 19 '13 at 14:26

You can try using Regular Expressions by testing the input string to have only digits (0-9) by using the .IsMatch(string input, string pattern) method in C#.

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpression;

public namespace MyNS
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        public void static Main(string[] args)
        {
             string input = Console.ReadLine();
             bool containsNumber = ContainsOnlyDigits(input);
        }

        private bool ContainOnlyDigits (string input)
        {
            bool containsNumbers = true;
            if (!Regex.IsMatch(input, @"/d"))
            {
                containsNumbers = false;
            }
            return containsNumbers;
        }
    }
}

Regards

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Hi jason and welcome to Stackoverflow. Thank you for answering but notice that the question was about the fastest way. Regular expressions are relatively slow this was discussed in other answers. –  Nahum Litvin Apr 25 at 5:35

I like Linq and to make it exit on first mismatch you can do this

string str = '0129834X33';
bool isAllDigits = !str.Any( ch=> ch < '0' || ch > '9' );
share|improve this answer

Taking the answer from Janiels and modifying it to a for loop instead of a foreach will get you a little bit more performance

  static bool IsDigitsOnly(string str) {
     for (int index = 0; index < str.Length; index++) {
        char c = str[index];
        if (c < '0' || c > '9')
           return false;
     }

     return true;
  }
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