Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best algorithm to achieve the following:

0010 0000 => 0000 0100

The conversion is from MSB->LSB to LSB->MSB. All bits must be reversed; that is, this is not endianness-swapping.

share|improve this question
1  
I think the appropriate name is a bitwise operation. –  Lucas Apr 14 '09 at 2:52
1  
I think you meant reversal, not rotation. –  Juliano Apr 14 '09 at 2:53
    
Most ARM processors have a built-in operation for that. The ARM Cortex-M0 doesn't, and I found using a per-byte table to swap bits is the fastest approach. –  starblue Jun 19 at 21:09

19 Answers 19

up vote 296 down vote accepted

NOTE: All algorithms below are in C, but should be portable to your language of choice (just don't look at me when they're not as fast :)

Options

Low Memory (32-bit int, 32-bit machine)(from here):

unsigned int
reverse(register unsigned int x)
{
    x = (((x & 0xaaaaaaaa) >> 1) | ((x & 0x55555555) << 1));
    x = (((x & 0xcccccccc) >> 2) | ((x & 0x33333333) << 2));
    x = (((x & 0xf0f0f0f0) >> 4) | ((x & 0x0f0f0f0f) << 4));
    x = (((x & 0xff00ff00) >> 8) | ((x & 0x00ff00ff) << 8));
    return((x >> 16) | (x << 16));

}

From the famous Bit Twiddling Hacks page:

Fastest (lookup table):

static const unsigned char BitReverseTable256[] = 
{
  0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0xC0, 0x20, 0xA0, 0x60, 0xE0, 0x10, 0x90, 0x50, 0xD0, 0x30, 0xB0, 0x70, 0xF0, 
  0x08, 0x88, 0x48, 0xC8, 0x28, 0xA8, 0x68, 0xE8, 0x18, 0x98, 0x58, 0xD8, 0x38, 0xB8, 0x78, 0xF8, 
  0x04, 0x84, 0x44, 0xC4, 0x24, 0xA4, 0x64, 0xE4, 0x14, 0x94, 0x54, 0xD4, 0x34, 0xB4, 0x74, 0xF4, 
  0x0C, 0x8C, 0x4C, 0xCC, 0x2C, 0xAC, 0x6C, 0xEC, 0x1C, 0x9C, 0x5C, 0xDC, 0x3C, 0xBC, 0x7C, 0xFC, 
  0x02, 0x82, 0x42, 0xC2, 0x22, 0xA2, 0x62, 0xE2, 0x12, 0x92, 0x52, 0xD2, 0x32, 0xB2, 0x72, 0xF2, 
  0x0A, 0x8A, 0x4A, 0xCA, 0x2A, 0xAA, 0x6A, 0xEA, 0x1A, 0x9A, 0x5A, 0xDA, 0x3A, 0xBA, 0x7A, 0xFA,
  0x06, 0x86, 0x46, 0xC6, 0x26, 0xA6, 0x66, 0xE6, 0x16, 0x96, 0x56, 0xD6, 0x36, 0xB6, 0x76, 0xF6, 
  0x0E, 0x8E, 0x4E, 0xCE, 0x2E, 0xAE, 0x6E, 0xEE, 0x1E, 0x9E, 0x5E, 0xDE, 0x3E, 0xBE, 0x7E, 0xFE,
  0x01, 0x81, 0x41, 0xC1, 0x21, 0xA1, 0x61, 0xE1, 0x11, 0x91, 0x51, 0xD1, 0x31, 0xB1, 0x71, 0xF1,
  0x09, 0x89, 0x49, 0xC9, 0x29, 0xA9, 0x69, 0xE9, 0x19, 0x99, 0x59, 0xD9, 0x39, 0xB9, 0x79, 0xF9, 
  0x05, 0x85, 0x45, 0xC5, 0x25, 0xA5, 0x65, 0xE5, 0x15, 0x95, 0x55, 0xD5, 0x35, 0xB5, 0x75, 0xF5,
  0x0D, 0x8D, 0x4D, 0xCD, 0x2D, 0xAD, 0x6D, 0xED, 0x1D, 0x9D, 0x5D, 0xDD, 0x3D, 0xBD, 0x7D, 0xFD,
  0x03, 0x83, 0x43, 0xC3, 0x23, 0xA3, 0x63, 0xE3, 0x13, 0x93, 0x53, 0xD3, 0x33, 0xB3, 0x73, 0xF3, 
  0x0B, 0x8B, 0x4B, 0xCB, 0x2B, 0xAB, 0x6B, 0xEB, 0x1B, 0x9B, 0x5B, 0xDB, 0x3B, 0xBB, 0x7B, 0xFB,
  0x07, 0x87, 0x47, 0xC7, 0x27, 0xA7, 0x67, 0xE7, 0x17, 0x97, 0x57, 0xD7, 0x37, 0xB7, 0x77, 0xF7, 
  0x0F, 0x8F, 0x4F, 0xCF, 0x2F, 0xAF, 0x6F, 0xEF, 0x1F, 0x9F, 0x5F, 0xDF, 0x3F, 0xBF, 0x7F, 0xFF
};

unsigned int v; // reverse 32-bit value, 8 bits at time
unsigned int c; // c will get v reversed

// Option 1:
c = (BitReverseTable256[v & 0xff] << 24) | 
    (BitReverseTable256[(v >> 8) & 0xff] << 16) | 
    (BitReverseTable256[(v >> 16) & 0xff] << 8) |
    (BitReverseTable256[(v >> 24) & 0xff]);

// Option 2:
unsigned char * p = (unsigned char *) &v;
unsigned char * q = (unsigned char *) &c;
q[3] = BitReverseTable256[p[0]]; 
q[2] = BitReverseTable256[p[1]]; 
q[1] = BitReverseTable256[p[2]]; 
q[0] = BitReverseTable256[p[3]];

You can extend this idea to 64-bit ints, or trade off memory for speed (assuming your L1 Data Cache is large enough), and reverse 16-bits at a time with a 64K-entry lookup table.


Others

Simple

unsigned int v;     // input bits to be reversed
unsigned int r = v; // r will be reversed bits of v; first get LSB of v
int s = sizeof(v) * CHAR_BIT - 1; // extra shift needed at end

for (v >>= 1; v; v >>= 1)
{   
  r <<= 1;
  r |= v & 1;
  s--;
}
r <<= s; // shift when v's highest bits are zero

Faster (32-bit processor)

unsigned char b = x;
b = ((b * 0x0802LU & 0x22110LU) | (b * 0x8020LU & 0x88440LU)) * 0x10101LU >> 16; 

Faster (64-bit processor)

unsigned char b; // reverse this (8-bit) byte
b = (b * 0x0202020202ULL & 0x010884422010ULL) % 1023;

If you want to do this on a 32-bit int, just reverse the bits in each bytes, and reverse the order of the bytes. That is:

unsigned int toReverse;
unsigned int reversed;
unsigned char inByte0 = (toReverse & 0xFF);
unsigned char inByte1 = (toReverse & 0xFF00) >> 8;
unsigned char inByte2 = (toReverse & 0xFF0000) >> 16;
unsigned char inByte3 = (toReverse & 0xFF000000) >> 24;
reversed = (reverseBits(inByte0) << 24) | (reverseBits(inByte1) << 16) | (reverseBits(inByte2) << 8) | (reverseBits(inByte3);

Results

I benchmarked the two most promising solutions, the lookup table, and bitwise-AND (the first one). The test machine is a laptop w/ 4GB of DDR2-800 and a Core 2 Duo T7500 @ 2.4GHz, 4MB L2 Cache; YMMV. I used gcc 4.3.2 on 64-bit Linux. OpenMP (and the GCC bindings) were used for high-resolution timers.

reverse.c

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <omp.h>

unsigned int
reverse(register unsigned int x)
{
    x = (((x & 0xaaaaaaaa) >> 1) | ((x & 0x55555555) << 1));
    x = (((x & 0xcccccccc) >> 2) | ((x & 0x33333333) << 2));
    x = (((x & 0xf0f0f0f0) >> 4) | ((x & 0x0f0f0f0f) << 4));
    x = (((x & 0xff00ff00) >> 8) | ((x & 0x00ff00ff) << 8));
    return((x >> 16) | (x << 16));

}

int main()
{
    unsigned int *ints = malloc(100000000*sizeof(unsigned int));
    unsigned int *ints2 = malloc(100000000*sizeof(unsigned int));
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++)
      ints[i] = rand();

    unsigned int *inptr = ints;
    unsigned int *outptr = ints2;
    unsigned int *endptr = ints + 100000000;
    // Starting the time measurement
    double start = omp_get_wtime();
    // Computations to be measured
    while(inptr != endptr)
    {
      (*outptr) = reverse(*inptr);
      inptr++;
      outptr++;
    }
    // Measuring the elapsed time
    double end = omp_get_wtime();
    // Time calculation (in seconds)
    printf("Time: %f seconds\n", end-start);

    free(ints);
    free(ints2);

    return 0;
}

reverse_lookup.c

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <omp.h>

static const unsigned char BitReverseTable256[] = 
{
  0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0xC0, 0x20, 0xA0, 0x60, 0xE0, 0x10, 0x90, 0x50, 0xD0, 0x30, 0xB0, 0x70, 0xF0, 
  0x08, 0x88, 0x48, 0xC8, 0x28, 0xA8, 0x68, 0xE8, 0x18, 0x98, 0x58, 0xD8, 0x38, 0xB8, 0x78, 0xF8, 
  0x04, 0x84, 0x44, 0xC4, 0x24, 0xA4, 0x64, 0xE4, 0x14, 0x94, 0x54, 0xD4, 0x34, 0xB4, 0x74, 0xF4, 
  0x0C, 0x8C, 0x4C, 0xCC, 0x2C, 0xAC, 0x6C, 0xEC, 0x1C, 0x9C, 0x5C, 0xDC, 0x3C, 0xBC, 0x7C, 0xFC, 
  0x02, 0x82, 0x42, 0xC2, 0x22, 0xA2, 0x62, 0xE2, 0x12, 0x92, 0x52, 0xD2, 0x32, 0xB2, 0x72, 0xF2, 
  0x0A, 0x8A, 0x4A, 0xCA, 0x2A, 0xAA, 0x6A, 0xEA, 0x1A, 0x9A, 0x5A, 0xDA, 0x3A, 0xBA, 0x7A, 0xFA,
  0x06, 0x86, 0x46, 0xC6, 0x26, 0xA6, 0x66, 0xE6, 0x16, 0x96, 0x56, 0xD6, 0x36, 0xB6, 0x76, 0xF6, 
  0x0E, 0x8E, 0x4E, 0xCE, 0x2E, 0xAE, 0x6E, 0xEE, 0x1E, 0x9E, 0x5E, 0xDE, 0x3E, 0xBE, 0x7E, 0xFE,
  0x01, 0x81, 0x41, 0xC1, 0x21, 0xA1, 0x61, 0xE1, 0x11, 0x91, 0x51, 0xD1, 0x31, 0xB1, 0x71, 0xF1,
  0x09, 0x89, 0x49, 0xC9, 0x29, 0xA9, 0x69, 0xE9, 0x19, 0x99, 0x59, 0xD9, 0x39, 0xB9, 0x79, 0xF9, 
  0x05, 0x85, 0x45, 0xC5, 0x25, 0xA5, 0x65, 0xE5, 0x15, 0x95, 0x55, 0xD5, 0x35, 0xB5, 0x75, 0xF5,
  0x0D, 0x8D, 0x4D, 0xCD, 0x2D, 0xAD, 0x6D, 0xED, 0x1D, 0x9D, 0x5D, 0xDD, 0x3D, 0xBD, 0x7D, 0xFD,
  0x03, 0x83, 0x43, 0xC3, 0x23, 0xA3, 0x63, 0xE3, 0x13, 0x93, 0x53, 0xD3, 0x33, 0xB3, 0x73, 0xF3, 
  0x0B, 0x8B, 0x4B, 0xCB, 0x2B, 0xAB, 0x6B, 0xEB, 0x1B, 0x9B, 0x5B, 0xDB, 0x3B, 0xBB, 0x7B, 0xFB,
  0x07, 0x87, 0x47, 0xC7, 0x27, 0xA7, 0x67, 0xE7, 0x17, 0x97, 0x57, 0xD7, 0x37, 0xB7, 0x77, 0xF7, 
  0x0F, 0x8F, 0x4F, 0xCF, 0x2F, 0xAF, 0x6F, 0xEF, 0x1F, 0x9F, 0x5F, 0xDF, 0x3F, 0xBF, 0x7F, 0xFF
};

int main()
{
    unsigned int *ints = malloc(100000000*sizeof(unsigned int));
    unsigned int *ints2 = malloc(100000000*sizeof(unsigned int));
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++)
      ints[i] = rand();

    unsigned int *inptr = ints;
    unsigned int *outptr = ints2;
    unsigned int *endptr = ints + 100000000;
    // Starting the time measurement
    double start = omp_get_wtime();
    // Computations to be measured
    while(inptr != endptr)
    {
    unsigned int in = *inptr;  

    // Option 1:
    //*outptr = (BitReverseTable256[in & 0xff] << 24) | 
    //    (BitReverseTable256[(in >> 8) & 0xff] << 16) | 
    //    (BitReverseTable256[(in >> 16) & 0xff] << 8) |
    //    (BitReverseTable256[(in >> 24) & 0xff]);

    // Option 2:
    unsigned char * p = (unsigned char *) &(*inptr);
    unsigned char * q = (unsigned char *) &(*outptr);
    q[3] = BitReverseTable256[p[0]]; 
    q[2] = BitReverseTable256[p[1]]; 
    q[1] = BitReverseTable256[p[2]]; 
    q[0] = BitReverseTable256[p[3]];

      inptr++;
      outptr++;
    }
    // Measuring the elapsed time
    double end = omp_get_wtime();
    // Time calculation (in seconds)
    printf("Time: %f seconds\n", end-start);

    free(ints);
    free(ints2);

    return 0;
}

I tried both approaches at several different optimizations, ran 3 trials at each level, and each trial reversed 100 million random unsigned ints. For the lookup table option, I tried both schemes (options 1 and 2) given on the bitwise hacks page. Results are shown below.

Bitwise AND

mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -o reverse reverse.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 2.000593 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 1.938893 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 1.936365 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O2 -o reverse reverse.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.942709 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.991104 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.947203 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O3 -o reverse reverse.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.922639 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.892372 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse
Time: 0.891688 seconds

Lookup Table (option 1)

mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.201127 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.196129 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.235972 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O2 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.633042 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.655880 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.633390 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O3 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.652322 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.631739 seconds              
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 0.652431 seconds  

Lookup Table (option 2)

mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.671537 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.688173 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.664662 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O2 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.049851 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.048403 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.085086 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ gcc -fopenmp -std=c99 -O3 -o reverse_lookup reverse_lookup.c
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.082223 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.053431 seconds
mrj10@mjlap:~/code$ ./reverse_lookup
Time: 1.081224 seconds

Conclusion

Use the lookup table, with option 1 (byte addressing is unsurprisingly slow) if you're concerned about performance. If you need to squeeze every last byte of memory out of your system (and you might, if you care about the performance of bit reversal), the optimized versions of the bitwise-AND approach aren't too shabby either.

Caveat

Yes, I know the benchmark code is a complete hack. Suggestions on how to improve it are more than welcome. Things I know about:

  • I don't have access to ICC. This may be faster (please respond in a comment if you can test this out).
  • A 64K lookup table may do well on some modern microarchitectures with large L1D.
  • -mtune=native didn't work for -O2/-O3 (ld blew up with some crazy symbol redefinition error), so I don't believe the generated code is tuned for my microarchitecture.
  • There may be a way to do this slightly faster with SSE. I have no idea how, but with fast replication, packed bitwise AND, and swizzling instructions, there's got to be something there.
  • I know only enough x86 assembly to be dangerous; here's the code GCC generated on -O3 for option 1, so somebody more knowledgable than myself can check it out:

32-bit

.L3:
movl    (%r12,%rsi), %ecx
movzbl  %cl, %eax
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %edx
movl    %ecx, %eax
shrl    $24, %eax
mov     %eax, %eax
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
sall    $24, %edx
orl     %eax, %edx
movzbl  %ch, %eax
shrl    $16, %ecx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
movzbl  %cl, %ecx
sall    $16, %eax
orl     %eax, %edx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rcx), %eax
sall    $8, %eax
orl     %eax, %edx
movl    %edx, (%r13,%rsi)
addq    $4, %rsi
cmpq    $400000000, %rsi
jne     .L3

EDIT: I also tried using uint64_t's on my machine to see if there was any performance boost. Performance was about 10% faster than 32-bit, and was nearly identical whether you were just using 64-bit types to reverse bits on two 32-bit ints at a time, or whether you were actually reversing bits in half as many 64-bit values. The assembly code is shown below (for the former case, reversing bits for 2 32-bit ints at a time):

.L3:
movq    (%r12,%rsi), %rdx
movq    %rdx, %rax
shrq    $24, %rax
andl    $255, %eax
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %ecx
movzbq  %dl,%rax
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
salq    $24, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movq    %rdx, %rax
shrq    $56, %rax
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
salq    $32, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movzbl  %dh, %eax
shrq    $16, %rdx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
salq    $16, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movzbq  %dl,%rax
shrq    $16, %rdx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
salq    $8, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movzbq  %dl,%rax
shrq    $8, %rdx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
salq    $56, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movzbq  %dl,%rax
shrq    $8, %rdx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rax), %eax
andl    $255, %edx
salq    $48, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movzbl  BitReverseTable256(%rdx), %eax
salq    $40, %rax
orq     %rax, %rcx
movq    %rcx, (%r13,%rsi)
addq    $8, %rsi
cmpq    $400000000, %rsi
jne     .L3
share|improve this answer
5  
It was an interesting exercise, if not all that fulfilling. If nothing else, I hope seeing the process is constructive to somebody else who may want to benchmark something more meritorious :) –  Matt J Apr 14 '09 at 7:09
15  
Good god! What a thorough answer! –  Nathan Fellman Apr 14 '09 at 8:06
2  
Why can't I mark an answer as favorite? :) This might be handy, great reference. –  albwq Apr 14 '09 at 11:16
5  
There needs to be a "best of" on stackoverflow for answers like this. –  Jay Nov 1 '11 at 14:26
3  
My...God! I think I've found...what may very well be...a TRUE speciman. I shall have to consult my documents, and do further research, but something tells me (God, help me), that this is by far the greatest, most thorough and useful answer Stack Overflow has yet. Even John Skeet would be both appalled and impressed! –  blissfreak Mar 5 '12 at 2:42

This is another solution for folks who love recursion.

The idea is simple. Divide up input by half and swap the two halves, continue till it it reaches single bit.

Illustrated in the example below.

Ex : If Input is 00101010   ==> Expected output is 01010100

1.  Divide the input into 2 halves 
    0010 --- 1010

2. Swap the 2 Halves
    1010     0010

3. Repeat the same for each half.
    10 -- 10 ---  00 -- 10
    10    10      10    00

    1-0 -- 1-0 --- 1-0 -- 0-0
    0 1    0 1     0 1    0 0

Done! Output is 01010100

Here is a recursive function to solve it. (Note I have used unsigned ints, so it can work for inputs upto sizeof(unsigned int)*8 bits.

The recursive function takes 2 parameters - The value whose bits need to be reversed and the number of bits in the value.

int reverse_bits_recursive(unsigned int num, unsigned int numBits)
{
    unsigned int reversedNum;;
    unsigned int mask = 0;

    mask = (0x1 << (numBits/2)) - 1;

    if (numBits == 1) return num;
    reversedNum = reverse_bits_recursive(num >> numBits/2, numBits/2) |
                   reverse_bits_recursive((num & mask), numBits/2) << numBits/2;
    return reversedNum;
}

int main()
{
    unsigned int reversedNum;
    unsigned int num;

    num = 0x55;
    reversedNum = reverse_bits_recursive(num, 8);
    printf ("Bit Reversal Input = 0x%x Output = 0x%x\n", num, reversedNum);

    num = 0xabcd;
    reversedNum = reverse_bits_recursive(num, 16);
    printf ("Bit Reversal Input = 0x%x Output = 0x%x\n", num, reversedNum);

    num = 0x123456;
    reversedNum = reverse_bits_recursive(num, 24);
    printf ("Bit Reversal Input = 0x%x Output = 0x%x\n", num, reversedNum);

    num = 0x11223344;
    reversedNum = reverse_bits_recursive(num,32);
    printf ("Bit Reversal Input = 0x%x Output = 0x%x\n", num, reversedNum);
}

This is the output:

Bit Reversal Input = 0x55 Output = 0xaa
Bit Reversal Input = 0xabcd Output = 0xb3d5
Bit Reversal Input = 0x123456 Output = 0x651690
Bit Reversal Input = 0x11223344 Output = 0x22cc4488
share|improve this answer

Well this certainly won't be an answer like Matt J's but hopefully it will still be useful.

    unsigned int reverse(unsigned int t)
    {
        size_t n = t;//store in 64 bit number for call to BSWAP
        __asm__("BSWAP %0" : "=r"(n) : "0"(n));
        n >>= ((sizeof(size_t) - sizeof(unsigned int)) * 8);
        n = ((n & 0xaaaaaaaa) >> 1) | ((n & 0x55555555) << 1);
        n = ((n & 0xcccccccc) >> 2) | ((n & 0x33333333) << 2);
        n = ((n & 0xf0f0f0f0) >> 4) | ((n & 0x0f0f0f0f) << 4);
        return n;
    }

This is exactly the same idea as Matt's best algorithm except that there's this little instruction called BSWAP which swaps the bytes (not the bits) of a 64-bit number. So b7,b6,b5,b4,b3,b2,b1,b0 becomes b0,b1,b2,b3,b4,b5,b6,b7. Since we are working with a 32-bit number we need to shift our byte-swapped number down 32 bits. This just leaves us with the task of swapping the 8 bits of each byte which is done and voila! we're done.

Timing: on my machine, Matt's algorithm ran in ~0.52 seconds per trial. Mine ran in about 0.42 seconds per trial. 20% faster is not bad I think.

If you're worried about the availability of the instruction BSWAP Wikipedia lists the instruction BSWAP as being added with 80846 which came out in 1989. It should be noted that Wikipedia also states that this instruction only works on 32 bit registers which is clearly not the case on my machine, it very much works only on 64-bit registers.

This method will work equally well for any integral datatype so the method can be generalized trivially by passing the number of bytes desired:

    size_t reverse(size_t n, unsigned int bytes)
    {
        __asm__("BSWAP %0" : "=r"(n) : "0"(n));
        n >>= ((sizeof(size_t) - bytes) * 8);
        n = ((n & 0xaaaaaaaa) >> 1) | ((n & 0x55555555) << 1);
        n = ((n & 0xcccccccc) >> 2) | ((n & 0x33333333) << 2);
        n = ((n & 0xf0f0f0f0) >> 4) | ((n & 0x0f0f0f0f) << 4);
        return n;
    }

which can then be called like:

    n = reverse(n, sizeof(char));//only reverse 8 bits
    n = reverse(n, sizeof(short));//reverse 16 bits
    n = reverse(n, sizeof(int));//reverse 32 bits
    n = reverse(n, sizeof(size_t));//reverse 64 bits

The compiler should be able to optimize the extra parameter away (assuming the compiler inlines the function) and for the sizeof(size_t) case the right-shift would be removed completely. Note that GCC at least is not able to remove the BSWAP and right-shift if passed sizeof(char).

share|improve this answer
    
According to the Intel Instruction Set Reference Volume 2A (intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/…) there are two BSWAP instructions: BSWAP r32 (working on 32 bit registers), which is encoded as 0F C8+rd and BSWAP r64 (working on 64 bit registers), which is encoded as REX.W + 0F C8+rd. –  Nubok Jun 19 at 16:21

I'm not sure if it the most efficient, but this should work:

//returns n rotated right by b bits
int rotRight(int n, int b)
{
  if(b >= 0)
    b = b%(8*sizeof(int));
  else
    b = 8*sizeof(int) - (-b)%(8*sizeof(int));
  return (n >>> b) | (n << (8*sizeof(int) - b));
}

//returns n rotated left by b bits
int rotLeft(int n, int b)
{
  if(b >= 0)
    b = b%(8*sizeof(int));
  else
    b = 8*sizeof(int) - (-b)%(8*sizeof(int));
  return (n << b) | (n >>> (8*sizeof(int) - b));
}

Update: added support for negative "b" value.

Note: this answer was based on an earlier version of the question, which incorrectly asked for bit rotation even though that was not what was actually desired.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is what I'm looking for. I won't be able to achieve complete reversal of the bits by rotating. Given that an int is 8 bits, rotating an int by 8 bits will return it to the original bit order. –  green_t Apr 14 '09 at 3:25
    
Yeah, my original question sort of did ask for bit rotation. Thanks anyway =) –  green_t Apr 14 '09 at 3:30
    
an int is usually 32 bits actually but it depends on platform and compiler.. chars are 8 bits –  Kip Apr 14 '09 at 3:34
2  
-1 for MANY bad things: branch operations are bad. division operations are REALLY bad. –  Trevor Boyd Smith Apr 14 '09 at 4:12
    
Branches operations can be bad indeed, but may not be noticeable in some situations (e.g. b is always positive). The modulo operation with a power of two is a no-brainer for any decent compiler. –  Raphaël Saint-Pierre Jul 9 '09 at 17:50

Presuming that you have an array of bits, how about this: 1. Starting from MSB, push bits into a stack one by one. 2. Pop bits from this stack into another array (or the same array if you want to save space), placing the first popped bit into MSB and going on to less significant bits from there.

Stack stack = new Stack();
Bit[] bits = new Bit[] { 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };

for (int i = 0; i < bits.Length; i++) 
{
    stack.push(bits[i]);
}

for (int i = 0; i < bits.Length; i++)
{
    bits[i] = stack.pop();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This one made me smile :) I'd love to see a benchmark of this C# solution against one of the ones I outlined above in optimized C. –  Matt J Apr 14 '09 at 6:41
    
LOL... But hey! the adjective 'best' in the 'best algorithm' is a pretty subjective thing :D –  Frederick The Fool Apr 14 '09 at 9:45

Of course the obvious source of bit-twiddling hacks is here: http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#BitReverseObvious

share|improve this answer

Generic

C code. Using 1 byte input data num as example.

    unsigned char num = 0xaa;   // 1010 1010 (aa) -> 0101 0101 (55)
    int s = sizeof(num) * 8;    // get number of bits
    int i, x, y, p;
    int var = 0;                // make var data type to be equal or larger than num

    for (i = 0; i < (s / 2); i++) {
        // extract bit on the left, from MSB
        p = s - i - 1;
        x = num & (1 << p);
        x = x >> p;
        printf("x: %d\n", x);

        // extract bit on the right, from LSB
        y = num & (1 << i);
        y = y >> i;
        printf("y: %d\n", y);

        var = var | (x << i);       // apply x
        var = var | (y << p);       // apply y
    }

    printf("new: 0x%x\n", new);
share|improve this answer

Implementation with low memory and fastest.

private Byte  BitReverse(Byte bData)
    {
        Byte[] lookup = { 0, 8,  4, 12, 
                          2, 10, 6, 14 , 
                          1, 9,  5, 13,
                          3, 11, 7, 15 };
        Byte ret_val = (Byte)(((lookup[(bData & 0x0F)]) << 4) + lookup[((bData & 0xF0) >> 4)]);
        return ret_val;
    }
share|improve this answer

Well, this is basically the same as the first "reverse()" but it is 64 bit and only needs one immediate mask to be loaded from the instruction stream. GCC creates code without jumps, so this should be pretty fast.

#include <stdio.h>

static unsigned long long swap64(unsigned long long val)
{
#define ZZZZ(x,s,m) (((x) >>(s)) & (m)) | (((x) & (m))<<(s));
/* val = (((val) >>16) & 0xFFFF0000FFFF) | (((val) & 0xFFFF0000FFFF)<<16); */

val = ZZZZ(val,32,  0x00000000FFFFFFFFull );
val = ZZZZ(val,16,  0x0000FFFF0000FFFFull );
val = ZZZZ(val,8,   0x00FF00FF00FF00FFull );
val = ZZZZ(val,4,   0x0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0Full );
val = ZZZZ(val,2,   0x3333333333333333ull );
val = ZZZZ(val,1,   0x5555555555555555ull );

return val;
#undef ZZZZ
}

int main(void)
{
unsigned long long val, aaaa[16] =
 { 0xfedcba9876543210,0xedcba9876543210f,0xdcba9876543210fe,0xcba9876543210fed
 , 0xba9876543210fedc,0xa9876543210fedcb,0x9876543210fedcba,0x876543210fedcba9
 , 0x76543210fedcba98,0x6543210fedcba987,0x543210fedcba9876,0x43210fedcba98765
 , 0x3210fedcba987654,0x210fedcba9876543,0x10fedcba98765432,0x0fedcba987654321
 };
unsigned iii;

for (iii=0; iii < 16; iii++) {
    val = swap64 (aaaa[iii]);
    printf("A[]=%016llX Sw=%016llx\n", aaaa[iii], val);
    }
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You might want to use the standard template library. It might be slower than the above mentioned code. However, it seems to me clearer and easier to understand.

 #include<bitset>
 #include<iostream>


 template<size_t N>
 const std::bitset<N> reverse(const std::bitset<N>& ordered)
 {
      std::bitset<N> reversed;
      for(size_t i = 0, j = N - 1; i < N; ++i, --j)
           reversed[j] = ordered[i];
      return reversed;
 };


 // test the function
 int main()
 {
      unsigned long num; 
      const size_t N = sizeof(num)*8;

      std::cin >> num;
      std::cout << std::showbase << std::hex;
      std::cout << "ordered  = " << num << std::endl;
      std::cout << "reversed = " << reverse<N>(num).to_ulong()  << std::endl;
      std::cout << "double_reversed = " << reverse<N>(reverse<N>(num)).to_ulong() << std::endl;  
 }
share|improve this answer

How about the following:

    uint reverseMSBToLSB32ui(uint input)
    {
        uint output = 0x00000000;
        uint toANDVar = 0;
        int places = 0;

        for (int i = 1; i < 32; i++)
        {
            places = (32 - i);
            toANDVar = (uint)(1 << places);
            output |= (uint)(input & (toANDVar)) >> places;

        }


        return output;
    }

Small and easy (though, 32 bit only).

share|improve this answer

This thread caught my attention since it deals with a simple problem that requires a lot of work (CPU cycles) even for a modern CPU. And one day I also stood there with the same ¤#%"#" problem. I had to flip millions of bytes. However I know all my target systems are modern Intel based so lets start optimizing to the extreme!!!

So I used Matt J's lookup code as the base. the system I'm benchmarking on is a i7 haswell 4700eq.

Matt J's lookup bitflipping 400 000 000 bytes: Around 0.272 seconds.

I then went ahead and tried to see if Intels ISPC compiler could vectorise the arithmetics in the reverse.c.

I'm not going to bore you with my findings here since I tried a lot to help the compiler find stuff, anyhow I ended up with performance of around 0.15 seconds to bitflipp 400 000 000 bytes. it's a great reduction but for my application that's still way way to slow..

So people let me present the fastest intel based bitflipper in the world. Clocked at:

Time to bitflip 400000000 bytes: 0.050082 seconds !!!!!

// Bitflip using AVX2 - The fastest Intel based bitflip in the world!!
// Made by Anders Cedronius 2014 (anders.cedronius (you know what) gmail.com)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <omp.h>

using namespace std;

#define DISPLAY_HEIGHT  4
#define DISPLAY_WIDTH   32
#define NUM_DATA_BYTES  400000000

// Constants (first we got the mask, then the high order nibble look up table and last we got the low order nibble lookup table)
__attribute__ ((aligned(32))) static unsigned char k1[32*3]={
        0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,0x0f,
        0x00,0x08,0x04,0x0c,0x02,0x0a,0x06,0x0e,0x01,0x09,0x05,0x0d,0x03,0x0b,0x07,0x0f,0x00,0x08,0x04,0x0c,0x02,0x0a,0x06,0x0e,0x01,0x09,0x05,0x0d,0x03,0x0b,0x07,0x0f,
        0x00,0x80,0x40,0xc0,0x20,0xa0,0x60,0xe0,0x10,0x90,0x50,0xd0,0x30,0xb0,0x70,0xf0,0x00,0x80,0x40,0xc0,0x20,0xa0,0x60,0xe0,0x10,0x90,0x50,0xd0,0x30,0xb0,0x70,0xf0
};

// The data to be bitflipped (+32 to avoid the quantization out of memory problem)
__attribute__ ((aligned(32))) static unsigned char data[NUM_DATA_BYTES+32]={};

extern "C" {
void bitflipbyte(unsigned char[],unsigned int,unsigned char[]);
}

int main()
{

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < NUM_DATA_BYTES; i++)
    {
        data[i] = rand();
    }

    printf ("\r\nData in(start):\r\n");
    for (unsigned int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
    {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < DISPLAY_WIDTH; i++)
        {
            printf ("0x%02x,",data[i+(j*DISPLAY_WIDTH)]);
        }
        printf ("\r\n");
    }

    printf ("\r\nNumber of 32-byte chunks to convert: %d\r\n",(unsigned int)ceil(NUM_DATA_BYTES/32.0));

    double start_time = omp_get_wtime();
    bitflipbyte(data,(unsigned int)ceil(NUM_DATA_BYTES/32.0),k1);
    double end_time = omp_get_wtime();

    printf ("\r\nData out:\r\n");
    for (unsigned int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
    {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < DISPLAY_WIDTH; i++)
        {
            printf ("0x%02x,",data[i+(j*DISPLAY_WIDTH)]);
        }
        printf ("\r\n");
    }
    printf("\r\n\r\nTime to bitflip %d bytes: %f seconds\r\n\r\n",NUM_DATA_BYTES, end_time-start_time);

    // return with no errors
    return 0;
}

The pritf's for debuging..

Here is the workhorse:

bits 64
global bitflipbyte

bitflipbyte:    
        vmovdqa     ymm2, [rdx]
        add         rdx, 20h
        vmovdqa     ymm3, [rdx]
        add         rdx, 20h
        vmovdqa     ymm4, [rdx]
bitflipp_loop:
        vmovdqa     ymm0, [rdi] 
        vpand       ymm1, ymm2, ymm0 
        vpandn      ymm0, ymm2, ymm0 
        vpsrld      ymm0, ymm0, 4h 
        vpshufb     ymm1, ymm4, ymm1 
        vpshufb     ymm0, ymm3, ymm0         
        vpor        ymm0, ymm0, ymm1
        vmovdqa     [rdi], ymm0
        add     rdi, 20h
        dec     rsi
        jnz     bitflipp_loop
        ret

The code takes 32 bytes then masks out the nibbles. The high nibble gets shifted right by 4. then I use vpshufb and ymm4 / ymm3 as lookup tables. I could use a single lookup table but then I would have to shift left before oring the nibbles together again.

There are even faster ways of flipping the bits. But I'm bound to single thread and CPU so this was the fastest I could achieve. Can you make a faster version?

Please make no comments about using the Intel C/C++ Compiler Intrinsic Equivalent commands...

share|improve this answer
    
geez, man, you should insta-get 100k upvotes on this site –  Ulterior Aug 18 at 22:24

I know its not C but asm:

var1 dw 0f0f0
clc
...<br>
     push ax
     push cx
     mov cx 16
loop1:
     shl var1
     shr ax
loop loop1
     pop ax
     pop cx

This works with the carry bit, so you may save flags too

share|improve this answer

Bit reversal in pseudo code

source -> byte to be reversed b00101100 destination -> reversed, also needs to be of unsigned type so sign bit is not propogated down

copy into temp so original is unaffected, also needs to be of unsigned type so that sign bit is not shifted in automaticaly

bytecopy = b0010110

LOOP8: //do this 8 times test if bytecopy is < 0 (negative)

    set bit8 (msb) of reversed = reversed | b10000000 

else do not set bit8

shift bytecopy left 1 place
bytecopy = bytecopy << 1 = b0101100 result

shift result right 1 place
reversed = reversed >> 1 = b00000000
8 times no then up^ LOOP8
8 times yes then done.
share|improve this answer

The Question asked is for reversing a byte (8 Bits of data)

typedef unsigned char byte;

byte reverseByte(byte a)
{
    int i;
    byte b = 0;

    for ( i = 0 ; i < 8 ; i ++)
    {
        b <<= 1;
        b |=  ( (a & (1 << i)) >> i);          
    }
    return b; 
}
share|improve this answer
unsigned char ReverseBits(unsigned char data)
{
    unsigned char k = 0, rev = 0;

    unsigned char n = data;

    while(n)

    {
        k = n & (~(n - 1));
        n &= (n - 1);
        rev |= (128 / k);
    }
    return rev;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please format your code –  user874774 May 8 at 11:44

I think the simplest method I know follows. MSB is input and LSB is 'reversed' output:

unsigned char rev(char MSB) {
    unsigned char LSB=0;  // for output
    _FOR(i,0,8) {
        LSB= LSB << 1;
        if(MSB&1) LSB = LSB | 1;
        MSB= MSB >> 1;
    }
    return LSB;
}

//    It works by rotating bytes in opposite directions. 
//    Just repeat for each byte.
share|improve this answer
// Purpose: to reverse bits in an unsigned short integer 
// Input: an unsigned short integer whose bits are to be reversed
// Output: an unsigned short integer with the reversed bits of the input one
unsigned short ReverseBits( unsigned short a )
{
     // declare and initialize number of bits in the unsigned short integer
     const char num_bits = sizeof(a) * CHAR_BIT;

     // declare and initialize bitset representation of integer a
     bitset<num_bits> bitset_a(a);          

     // declare and initialize bitset representation of integer b (0000000000000000)
     bitset<num_bits> bitset_b(0);                  

     // declare and initialize bitset representation of mask (0000000000000001)
     bitset<num_bits> mask(1);          

     for ( char i = 0; i < num_bits; ++i )
     {
          bitset_b = (bitset_b << 1) | bitset_a & mask;
          bitset_a >>= 1;
     }

     return (unsigned short) bitset_b.to_ulong();
}

void PrintBits( unsigned short a )
{
     // declare and initialize bitset representation of a
     bitset<sizeof(a) * CHAR_BIT> bitset(a);

     // print out bits
     cout << bitset << endl;
}


// Testing the functionality of the code

int main ()
{
     unsigned short a = 17, b;

     cout << "Original: "; 
     PrintBits(a);

     b = ReverseBits( a );

     cout << "Reversed: ";
     PrintBits(b);
}

// Output:
Original: 0000000000010001
Reversed: 1000100000000000
share|improve this answer
int main() {
    int n;
    scanf("%d", &n);
    while (n) {
        if (n & 1)
            printf("1");
        else
            printf("0");
        n >>= 1;
    }
    printf("\n");
}

Output:
25
10011
share|improve this answer
1  
No, that will print the bits. Not reverse them. –  Gille Dec 5 '12 at 18:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.