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Suppose I changed my file foo.txt and run git add foo.txt. Now foo.txt appears in the list of the "changes to be committed".

Now I would like to see my foo.txt before these changes. How can I do it with git?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can do the following:

git show HEAD:foo.txt

In general, this syntax is very useful for seeing a file from a particular commit without touching your working tree. For example, if you want to see what README.txt was like in the grand-parent of commit f414f31 you can do:

git show f414f31^^:README.txt

Update: as VonC comments below, it's important to note here that the path here must be the full path from the root of the working tree, even if you're currently in a subdirectory.

However, when staging changes, one does tend to be more often interested in differences, which is what Abizern interpreted your question as asking about. A simple way of thinking about those commands is:

  • git diff means "what changes haven't I staged yet?"
  • git diff --cached means "what changes have I already staged?"
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+1, but as mentioned in stackoverflow.com/questions/2108405/branch-descriptions-in-git/…, and illustrated here stackoverflow.com/questions/2364147/…, you need to use the full path form the root directory of the repo when using git show. –  VonC Sep 18 '11 at 14:54
    
Thanks, VonC - I've updated my answer to include that useful reminder. –  Mark Longair Sep 18 '11 at 15:08

I think what you're asking is about diffs (which show the differences between versions of files)

I've written about them here

But a summary diagram is:

enter image description here

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