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It is a curved div basically:

curved div

So it is possible to do with just css and no images?

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see @kaster answer –  Book Of Zeus Sep 18 '11 at 14:42
    
I don;t think it is... those in that article are all symmetrical shapes and this is not. Those ones use the border hack to get their angles. –  Joseph Marikle Sep 18 '11 at 14:45
    
"css or css3" Um, they're the same thing. –  BoltClock Sep 18 '11 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

Well... I was the biggest skeptic of this shape, but it seems it is possible O_o

Demo

HTML

<div class="shape one"></div>
<div class="shape two"></div>
<div class="shape three"></div>

CSS

.shape
{
    background:red;
    float:left;
}

.one
{
    border-width:0px;
    border-bottom:10px solid red;
    border-left:200px solid #fff;
    width:0px;
}

.two
{
    width:200px;
    height:40px;
    clear:left;
}

.three
{
    border-width:0px;
    border-top:50px solid red;
    border-right:10px solid #fff;
    width:0px;
    margin-top:-10px;
}
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Why you're not using SVG? It's supported in all major browsers and that shape would be very very small in SVG format. It also would be in your DOM tree so you could bind events on it.

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Mobile support is another story... –  Michael Haren Sep 27 '11 at 13:33

The border method looks grainy in the browsers I tested. Here's a method using the ::before and ::after pseudo-elements and CSS transform: skew() that looks smoother. You can adjust the angles as needed. This uses only one <div>.

Demo: jsFiddle

Output:

output

HTML:

<div class="quadrilateral"></div>

CSS:

.quadrilateral {
    background-color: red;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 50px;
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
}
.quadrilateral::before {
    background-color: red;
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    height: 61px;
    position: absolute;
    right: -3px;
    top: -11px;
    transform:             skewX( -5deg ); 
        -ms-transform:     skewX( -5deg ); 
        -webkit-transform: skewX( -5deg ); 
        -o-transform:      skewX( -5deg ); 
        -moz-transform:    skewX( -5deg ); 
    width: 10px;
}
.quadrilateral::after {
    background-color: red;
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    height: 15px;
    position: absolute;
    top: -6px;
    transform:             skewY( -2deg ); 
        -ms-transform:     skewY( -2deg ); 
        -webkit-transform: skewY( -2deg ); 
        -o-transform:      skewY( -2deg ); 
        -moz-transform:    skewY( -2deg ); 
    width: 300px;
}
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