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In my code almost every function has one or more malloc calls, and each time I have to do something like:

char *ptr = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * some_int);
if (ptr == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "failed to allocate memory.\n");
    return -1;
}

that's four extra lines of code and if I add them everytime after I use a malloc, the length of my code will increase a lot.. so is there an elegant way to deal with this?

Thank you so much!!

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If the length of your code will increase a lot, you should think about why you're calling malloc so much. This probably indicates you're trying to translate a different language's idioms into C rather than using C properly... –  R.. Sep 18 '11 at 15:45
2  
Note that casting the return value of malloc in C is not needed and may hide an error the compiler would have caught without the cast. –  pmg Sep 18 '11 at 17:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sorry, but there's nothing you can do about that in C. Except... gasp... wrap it all in a macro which will automate the if check and allow you to write custom error-handling code each time. There, I said it.

Seriously, C isn't meant to provide conveniences like this. If you don't mind exiting the program on the spot, you can wrap it in a function of course that does exit when the allocation fails -- but that's no general solution.

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1  
Or wrap it in a function instead of a macro. –  user142019 Sep 18 '11 at 15:29
2  
@WTP: The problem with the function is that it can detect the condition, but not really handle it. At least not without your going to such great lengths that you 'd be better off with 4 lines of code at each call site. At least as far as I can tell. –  Jon Sep 18 '11 at 15:32

There isn't usually much point in trying to stumble on when all memory is consumed. Might as well call it quits:

char* allocCharBuffer(size_t numberOfChars) 
{
    char *ptr = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * numberOfChars);
    if (ptr == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "failed to allocate memory.\n");
        exit(-1);
    }
    return ptr;
}
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I would simply use the assert macro.

char *ptr = malloc(some_int);
assert(ptr);

I does exactly what you are doing with in your if clause: print a diagnostic and exit. In addition it usually has the nice feature of giving you source file and line number information.

Edit: Somehow I had thought that you wanted to exit on failure. Generally when you don't write for embedded platforms, you have not much chances to recover after a malloc failure. And malloc failures are rare, since it means that you have eaten up your whole address space not only the RAM + SWAP that is available. So generally you are better off by simply exiting. Think about it if it is worth in scratching your head too much for that. Only come back to it we you really see that it is a problem.

BTW: your malloc call looked bogus. (This has been discussed a lot of times here on SO)

  • don't cast the return of malloc, a cast could hide a missing include file and produce subtle errors in that case
  • sizeof(char) is 1 by definition, so multiplying some_int with a 1 will not make your code more or lesser portable

And also -1 is a non standard code for exit. Use EXIT_FAILURE if you have to use exit.

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mmm I think using sizeof(char) could make my code more portable, and I only want to exit the function that the code is in, not the entire process, should I still use exit? About not casting the return of malloc, I really have no idea.. could you tell me why? Thank you. –  Rachel Sep 18 '11 at 19:14
    
No exit will terminate your process, you should use return. But then you must have a convention that tells the caller that the call has failed. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 18 '11 at 19:19
    
Thank you, but why shouldn't I cast the return of malloc then? –  Rachel Sep 19 '11 at 2:09
1  
This should be common knowledge but a lot of people actually forgot about it: assert macro is disable in Release mode (if NDEBUG is set for example). So this source code may not have the expected behavior (or worse, if you want to check something else than alloc memory). –  Phong Jul 3 '13 at 6:13
3  
In what is it preposterous? Assert is disable in Release mode. So your answer is not what the author is expecting. Tell me where I am wrong? And the fact that this post is 2 year old is not an excuse. Before posting a new question, you look for similar question in the blog. So keeping commenting/improving comment happen all time. And No i didnt downvote your post. –  Phong Jul 3 '13 at 7:18

When you have no real error handling (except printing something and exiting), the simple and established solution is to define a function safe_malloc which incorporates the check. (Edit: Or, of course, a macro. Whatever rocks your boat.)

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If you error condition is always that simple (print error message and return) you can rewrite to save lines.

int errmsg(const char *msg, int retval) {
    fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", msg);
    return retval;
}

if ((ptr = malloc(size)) == NULL) return errmsg("failed to allocate memory.", -1);
/* ... */
free(ptr);
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You could use macros. This is cheaper than grouping this code into a function because Macros don't have the overhead a function call incurs. Macros are expanded by the preprocessor stage of compilation and can be verified by the '-E' option in gcc. Now say we have func1(), func2(), func3()

#define MY_MALLOC(_ptr,_count, _lbl) \
do { \
 if (NULL == (ptr = malloc(sizeof(char) * _count))) { \
    fprintf(stderr, "Failed to allocate memory.\n"); \
    goto _lbl; \
 } \
} while(0)

func1() {  
 char *ptr;
 MY_MALLOC(ptr,10,Error);
 ....
 ...
 return (0);
Error:
 return (1);
}


func2() {  
 char *ptr;
 MY_MALLOC(ptr,10,Error);
 ....
 ...
 return (0);
Error:
 return (1);
}


func3() {  
 char *ptr;
 MY_MALLOC(ptr,10,Error);
 ....
 ...
 return (0);
Error:
 return (1);
}

#undef MY_MALLOC
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