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I have stored procedure where I have to pass parameters, But the problem is I am not sure how many parameters is going to come it can be 1, in next run it can be 5.

cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@id", id)

Can anyone help how can I pass these variable number of parameters in stored procedure? Thanks

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1  
To pass a varying number of parameters you would just have conditional logic in your client code to add the required parameters but do you mean that you want to know how to pass a varying number of ids to the stored proc? –  Martin Smith Sep 18 '11 at 15:47
    
yes...its something like passing arrays to stored procedure...but the length of this array can vary. –  CPDS Sep 18 '11 at 15:51
    
What RDBMS is this for (including version)? –  Martin Smith Sep 18 '11 at 15:53
    
sql server 2008 r2 –  CPDS Sep 18 '11 at 15:54
1  
See sommarskog.se/arrays-in-sql-2008.html –  Martin Smith Sep 18 '11 at 15:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could pass it in as a comma-separated list, then use a split function, and join against the results.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.SplitInts
(
   @List       VARCHAR(MAX),
   @Delimiter  CHAR(1)
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
   RETURN 
   (
       SELECT Item = CONVERT(INT, Item)
       FROM
       (
           SELECT Item = x.i.value('(./text())[1]', 'INT')
           FROM
           (
               SELECT [XML] = CONVERT(XML, '<i>' 
                    + REPLACE(@List, @Delimiter, '</i><i>') 
                    + '</i>').query('.')
           ) AS a
           CROSS APPLY
           [XML].nodes('i') AS x(i)
       ) AS y
       WHERE Item IS NOT NULL
   );

Now your stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.doStuff
    @List VARCHAR(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT cols FROM dbo.table AS t
        INNER JOIN dbo.SplitInts(@List, ',') AS list
        ON t.ID = list.Item;
END
GO

Then to call it:

EXEC dbo.doStuff @List = '1, 2, 3, ...';

You can see some background, other options, and performance comparisons here:

http://sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2010/07/07/splitting-a-list-of-integers-another-roundup.aspx

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SQLServer lets you pass TABLE parameter to the stored procedure. So you can define table type, CREATE TYPE LIST_OF_IDS AS TABLE (id int not null primary key), alter your procedure to accept a variable of this type (it should be readonly).

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Stored procedures support optional parameters. Like C# 4, you can specify a default value using =. For example:

create procedure dbo.doStuff(
     @stuffId int = null, 
     @stuffSubId int = null, 
     ...)
as
...

For parameters you don't want to pass, either set them to null or don't add them to cmd.Parameters at all. They will have their default value in the stored procedure

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Have you considered using dictionary for that purpose? It will allow you to pass any number of parameters as key-value pairs. Then you'll need just to go through the dictionary and add those parameters to cmd.

void DoStuff(Dictionary<string, object> parameters)
{
    // some code
    foreach(var param in parameters)
    {
        cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter(param.Key, param.Value);
    }
    // some code
}

In stored procedure itself you'll need to specify default values for the parameters.

CREATE PROCEDURE DoStuff(
     @id INT = NULL,
     @value INT = NULL,
     -- the list of parameters with their default values goes here
     )
AS
-- procedure body
share|improve this answer
    
This is on C# side...How do I read this on sql server side...how will I create procedure? –  CPDS Sep 18 '11 at 16:13
    
You could check Andomar's response for procedure sample. Just added similar snippet to have everything in the same place. –  Li0liQ Sep 18 '11 at 19:21

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