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I tend to write a class declaration in a source file and then decide I want to export it in a header. But this always means that I have to split it up and edit almost every function so that the class is declared in the header, and I have to put the functions individually in the cpp file.

Why is it that I cannot leave the class A { in the source file so I can avoid adding A:: at every function? The compiler just assumes it's a redefinition of A. What is the reason that the compiler doesn't simply acknowledge that I am describing the same A?

Also, partly related: Is there a way for me to hide the private variables of a class in the source file rather than putting it in the header? The header is used to export functionality of a class to other parts of a program, to which I do not need to reveal my private members. Yet I don't believe I can declare them in the implementation cpp because I can't redefine the class there, I can only implement functions in there.

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What does it mean >> I tend to write a class declaration in a source file and then decide I want to export it in a header. –  Nawaz Sep 18 '11 at 15:53
    
You could just stick all function definitions in the header file. Some libraries do that do make linking easier. Please note that this is not good practice. Another note, why do you want to "hide" members? Isn't private enough? Nobody can call a private member unless they are calling from an implemented function in your class. –  tjameson Sep 18 '11 at 15:55
    
You're talking abt convenience, use a decent IDE and you won't have this problem! CodeBlocks, Eclipse CDT have wizards. Not the mention that if you're any good with regEx, you can do the change pretty easily in vi/emacs/TextPad/Notepad++ –  thekashyap Sep 18 '11 at 15:55
    
@Nawaz: It means he starts every class definition as not being available in a header to be shared, and only moves it into a header when he explicitly decides that it should be shared. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 18 '11 at 15:56
1  
That is why C++ is called C++ and not Java :)! –  Vincenzo Pii Sep 18 '11 at 16:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tend to write a class declaration in a source file and then decide I want to export it in a header. But this always means that I have to split it up and edit almost every function so that the class is declared in the header, and I have to put the functions individually in the cpp file.

If you always write the class definition and member function definitions separately — even when in the same file — then this "problem" immediately disintegrates into oblivionness:

Same file

// myClass.cpp

struct myClass {
   void f();
};

void myClass::f() {
   // ...
}

Now split up

// myClass.hpp

struct myClass {
   void f();
};

// myClass.cpp

#include "myClass.hpp"

void myClass::f() {
   // ...
}

Easy!


Why is it that I cannot leave the class A { in the source file so I can avoid adding A:: at every function? The compiler just assumes it's a redefinition of A. What is the reason that the compiler doesn't simply acknowledge that I am describing the same A?

That's just how the language is. A class definition is self-contained and unique and must contain all member declarations. I guess it would be too complex to be able to split it up; "that's just the way it is" is about as much of a proven rationale as you're going to get here, though.


Is there a way for me to hide the private variables of a class in the source file rather than putting it in the header?

Look up the PIMPL idiom.

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Thanks for addressing all my points. I suppose I'll start separating it that way. pimpl is interesting. Feels like a bit of a hack though. Oh well. –  Steven Lu Sep 18 '11 at 16:01
    
@Steven: Yea, it is. Frankly I'd just live with the exposed privates. At the end of the day, you can go too far trying to hide things from users of your library. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 18 '11 at 16:02
    
PIMPL is not an idiom. It's disgusting. Here, let me vastly overcomplicate my class and waste perfectly good cycles and memory because the compiler sucks donkey balls. –  Puppy Sep 18 '11 at 16:04
    
@DeadMG: PIMPL is most certainly an idiom. I agree that it's not a very nice one. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 18 '11 at 16:05
    
Yeah, it doesn't bother me that much after all. @chrisaycock makes a good point, the compiler does need to know how much space to allocate for everything. –  Steven Lu Sep 18 '11 at 16:05

C++ has inherited a rather antiqued header inclusion mechanism from C.

Due to how it works, if you put everything in your header, the compiler will have to recompile those functions every time you include that file — this slows down compilation significantly.

Why does that happen? When you include a header, the code is literally copy-pasted into the source file. The compiler doesn't know where it originally comes from, so it cannot know that those functions might have already been compiled before.

It's not so bad though: the extra code is removed in the linker phase. The linker can identify the same function when it appears in multiple places, and remove the excess code.

By having the header include only the declaration of the class and not the definition as well, you save the compiler some work. It only compiles those functions when it processes the class source file and that's it.

Is there a way for me to hide the private variables of a class in the source file rather than putting it in the header?

There is no mechanism offered by the language itself to do this, but you can take a look at the Pimpl Idiom. But don't start using it like crazy, you might just be over-engineering if all you want to do is remove the private fields from the header.

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Oh, yeah I know enough to stay far, far away from something as atrocious as PIMPL. Good to know that the compiler will in fact go through and trim out the fat if I happen to implement something in the header and leave it there. I tend to do that with short getters and setters. –  Steven Lu Sep 18 '11 at 16:28
    
Actually, about getters and setters, they usually get inlined. Compilers do that with short functions to save some CPU cycles: instead of bothering to call a function for just two lines of code, it just inlines ("pastes") those lines of code at the actual call site. That's just a little fun (and comforting) fact to know. –  Paul Manta Sep 18 '11 at 17:02
    
Yes, that's quite nice actually, it lets me enforce that the values can never get tampered with yet has no access performance penalty. This is why I use C++ and not something else. –  Steven Lu Sep 18 '11 at 19:07

I assume you are talking about something like this:

Header file

class Foo {
public:
   do_something_with_foo() const;
   do_something_to_foo();
private;
   // Instance members elided
};

Source file

#include "foo.hh"

class Foo {
   do_something_with_foo() const {
      // body elided
   }

  do_something_foo() {
      // body elided
   }
};

Which is of course illegal. The reason is that you can't define the class twice. The second looks just like a definition. Some other syntax is needed to identify that what is being defined is a class member function. Tomalak's answer shows how to do that.

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Yea, I think that's what he's asking. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 18 '11 at 16:08
    
Actually the OP has some point. Of course, this answer says how an actual C++ compiler react to similar code. But I don't see any problem -for a further C++3x- to accept subsequently additive and refining decalrations going up towards a full definition. Of course, it's another way to parse, non compatible with old C traditions, but sooner or later the yhave to be abandoned. –  Emilio Garavaglia Sep 18 '11 at 17:15

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