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Suppose I have the following class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace NetworkSwitcher
{
    [Serializable]
    class testClass
    {
        public string str;

        public testClass(string _str)
        {
            this.str = _str;
        }
    }
}

Now when I try to execute the following, it throws a System.Windows.Markup.XamlParseException.

testClass tc = new testClass("Hello World");
XmlSerializer xsl = new XmlSerializer(typeof(testClass));
TextWriter WriteFileStream = new StreamWriter(@"C:\NSProfiles.xml");
xsl.Serialize(WriteFileStream, tc);
WriteFileStream.Close();

If I use a simple String type object instead of tectClass, the code works fine:

string data = "hello world";
XmlSerializer xsl = new XmlSerializer(typeof(String));
TextWriter WriteFileStream = new StreamWriter(@"C:\NSProfiles.xml");
xsl.Serialize(WriteFileStream, data);
WriteFileStream.Close();

So I guess the problem is in the class definition, how can I fix it? I am using WPF, not WinForms and I don't have any prior experience in WPF or XMLSerialization. Let me know if I shall provide any other useful information.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To fix the error, add a default constructor to the class (a constructor that takes no arguments).

Doing this alone will stop the error from happening, but may not serialize the string value correctly. I'm not 100% sure on that, as it may be able to serialize a public member variable.

If not, you'll want to add a public Property for the string value.

A more "standard" implementation of this class would likely look like the following. You would either have a second constructor or just use the setter to set the value:

[Serializable]     
public class testClass     
{         
    private string str;          

    public testClass()
    {             
    }     

    public string Str
    {
        get { return str; }
        set { str = value; }
    }
} 

Edit: Added the public modifier to the class. Should work now.

Also, I am guessing you are calling the code that throws the exception in the constructor of the Window? That is the only reason I can see that this would throw a XAML exception. Errors in the constructor get wrapped in that XAML exception, so in these cases you want to look at the InnerException to find the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This did not help, its still throwing me the same exception :( –  fahad.hasan Sep 18 '11 at 16:40
    
Oops, didn't notice when I cut and pasted that the class is not marked public. Making it public should fix it. –  Phil Sandler Sep 18 '11 at 17:03
    
Yes, moving the function call outside the Window constructor kinda solved the problem. I've switched to Runtime Serialization instead of XML Serialization. I'll try XML Serialization again get back to you. –  fahad.hasan Sep 18 '11 at 17:31
    
Yes, adding [Serializable()] on top of the class solved the problem. It doesn't matter if I call the method inside the Window constructor or not, but yes, calling it outside the constructor gave me a prettier exception trace :) –  fahad.hasan Sep 18 '11 at 17:49

These solved the problem.

  • Adding [Serializable()] on top of the class.
  • Adding a default constructor.
  • Adding public class modifier to the class.

    using System;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    
    namespace NetworkSwitcher
    {
    
        [Serializable()]
        public class testClass
        {
            private string str;
    
            public string _str
            {
                get { return str; }
                set { str = value; }
            }
    
            public testClass()
            {
                //Default
            }
        } 
    }
    
share|improve this answer

Start reading the documentation on Xml Serialization.

You miss:

  • The public property for the string
  • All the attributes for Xml serializaion to work.

Nlot sure where your XAML exception comes from, though, this one makes NO sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Any link would be useful :) Thanks! –  fahad.hasan Sep 18 '11 at 16:28
    
? Sorry, no - you want me to provide a link to the .NET core documentation? Check XmlRootAttribute to get started - F1 out of visual studio ets you to the help system. XmlRoot, XmlElement etc. are the attibutes you need to add. –  TomTom Sep 18 '11 at 17:06

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