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I have 2 arrays called xVal, and yVal.

I'm using these arrays as coords. What I want to do is to make sure that the array doesn't contain 2 identical sets of coords.

Lets say my arrays looks like this:

int xVal[4] = {1,1,3,4};
int yVal[4] = {1,1,5,4};

Here I want to find the match between xVal[0] yVal[0] and xVal[1] yVal[1] as 2 identical sets of coords called 1,1.

I have tried some different things with a forLoop, but I cant make it work as intended.

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2  
It will be much easier to do if you have just one array of coords, perhaps modeled as std::pair<int, int>. –  Jon Sep 18 '11 at 16:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it with two for loops:

int MAX=4; //number of elements in array
for (int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
{
    for (int j=i+1; j<MAX; j++)
    {
        if (xVal[i]==xVal[j] && yVal[i]==yVal[j])
        {
            //DUPLICATE ELEMENT at xVal[j], yVal[j]. Here you implement what
            //you want (maybe just set them to -1, or delete them and move everything
            //one position back)
        }
    }
}

Small explanation: first variable i get value 0. Than you loop j over all possible numbers. That way you compare xVal[0] and yVal[0] with all other values. j starts at i+1 because you don't need to compare values before i (they have already been compared).

Edit - you should consider writing small class that will represent a point, or at least structure, and using std::vector instead of arrays (it's easier to delete an element in the middle). That should make your life easier :)

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This is a really bad approach in general because it is O(n²). –  Jon Sep 18 '11 at 16:45
    
it's the simplest one ;) –  xx77aBs Sep 18 '11 at 20:00
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You can write an explicit loop using an O(n^2) approach (see answer from x77aBs) or you can trade in some memory for performance. For example using std::set

bool unique(std::vector<int>& x, std::vector<int>& y)
{
    std::set< std::pair<int, int> > seen;
    for (int i=0,n=x.size(); i<n; i++)
    {
        if (seen.insert(std::make_pair(x[i], y[i])).second == false)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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int identicalValueNum = 0;
int identicalIndices[4]; // 4 is the max. possible number of identical values
for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
{
    if (xVal[i] == yVal[i])
    {
        identicalIndices[identicalValueNum++] = i;
    }
}
for (int i = 0; i < identicalValueNum; i++)
{
    printf(
        "The %ith value in both arrays is the same and is: %i.\n",
        identicalIndices[i], xVal[i]);
}

For

int xVal[4] = {1,1,3,4};
int yVal[4] = {1,1,5,4};

the output of printf would be:

The 0th value in both arrays is the same and is: 1.

The 1th value in both arrays is the same and is: 1.

The 3th value in both arrays is the same and is: 4.

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S/He's trying to solve a different problem; given a list of 2d points s/he wants to know if all points are distinct or not. The problem in the example is not that the point is (1, 1) (i.e. that x == y) but that is stored twice in the list. –  6502 Sep 18 '11 at 16:55
    
Could be. But the question ain't clear enough to be sure. –  Desmond Hume Sep 18 '11 at 17:21
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