Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a Java noob. I've only used it for a few days and I'm still trying to figure it all out. In a program, is a line the same thing as a statement?

share|improve this question
    
So many answers... Which one do I accept? –  Benny Sep 18 '11 at 17:24
    
Accept the one that works for you. –  fireshadow52 Sep 18 '11 at 17:25
1  
The one that is most helpful to you. If they are all equally helpful, typically the first answer posted is accepted. –  Matt Ball Sep 18 '11 at 17:25
2  
@Benny Make a program and use Random to let the program chooses the one you will accept ;) –  Eng.Fouad Sep 18 '11 at 17:25
3  
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Matt Ball Sep 18 '11 at 17:51
show 8 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. The Java compiler doesn't look at lines, spacing, or other formatting issues when compiling a program. It just wants to see the ; at the end of each statement. This line would work just fine:

int i = 13; i += 23;

However, doing things like this can--and most likely will--cause readability issues with the source code. For this reason, it isn't recommended.

It is also possible for a single statement to span multiple lines:

int i =
    13;
share|improve this answer
add comment

No. I can write:

int x = 1; int y = 2;

That's one line, and two statements.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In a program, is a line the same thing as a statement?

No.

Want to know the difference? Start with the JLS §14.5: Blocks and Statements:

Statement:
        StatementWithoutTrailingSubstatement
        LabeledStatement
        IfThenStatement
        IfThenElseStatement
        WhileStatement
        ForStatement

StatementWithoutTrailingSubstatement:
        Block
        EmptyStatement
        ExpressionStatement
        AssertStatement
        SwitchStatement
        DoStatement
        BreakStatement
        ContinueStatement
        ReturnStatement
        SynchronizedStatement
        ThrowStatement
        TryStatement

StatementNoShortIf:
        StatementWithoutTrailingSubstatement
        LabeledStatementNoShortIf
        IfThenElseStatementNoShortIf
        WhileStatementNoShortIf
        ForStatementNoShortIf
share|improve this answer
add comment

According to Java grammar:

Statement:
    Block
    if ParExpression Statement [else Statement]
    for ( ForInitOpt   ;   [Expression]   ;   ForUpdateOpt ) Statement
    while ParExpression Statement
    do Statement while ParExpression   ; 
    try Block ( Catches | [Catches] finally Block )
    switch ParExpression { SwitchBlockStatementGroups }
    synchronized ParExpression Block
    return [Expression] ; 
    throw Expression   ; 
    break [Identifier]
    continue [Identifier]
    ; 
    ExpressionStatement
    Identifier   :   Statement

Based on this you can easily see that one statement can span multiple lines but also single line can host multiple statements. Also note that statement is a very broad term.

share|improve this answer
    
Your point being? –  delnan Sep 18 '11 at 17:23
    
Just a heads up, that's not the most recent version of the JLS. –  Matt Ball Sep 18 '11 at 17:26
add comment

This line includes two statements:

j = 5; j += 3;

So, a line is not necessarily a statement...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Only by common practice, and for readability. In Java statements are terminated with semicolons, or in the case of blocks, by pairs of curlybraces ( { } ).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.