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Is it possible to match 2 regular expressions in Python?

For instance, I have a use-case wherein I need to compare 2 expressions like this:

re.match('google\.com\/maps', 'google\.com\/maps2', re.IGNORECASE)

I would expect to be returned a RE object.

But obviously, Python expects a string as the second parameter. Is there a way to achieve this, or is it a limitation of the way regex matching works?


Background: I have a list of regular expressions [r1, r2, r3, ...] that match a string and I need to find out which expression is the most specific match of the given string. The way I assumed I could make it work was by:
(1) matching r1 with r2.
(2) then match r2 with r1.
If both match, we have a 'tie'. If only (1) worked, r1 is a 'better' match than r2 and vice-versa.
I'd loop (1) and (2) over the entire list.

I admit it's a bit to wrap one's head around (mostly because my description is probably incoherent), but I'd really appreciate it if somebody could give me some insight into how I can achieve this. Thanks!

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5  
Maybe you could explain what you mean by "which expression matches the given string the best"? What is the measure of the quality of a match? –  Ned Batchelder Sep 18 '11 at 17:55
    
'best' here means the more specific match. For instance, 'goog' matches 'goo' with more specificity than 'googler'. –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 18:05
    
changed the description to refer to 'specific match' instead of 'best'. –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 18:11
    
Supposed there's a way to get the most "specific" expression. What would you do with the found most specific expression? –  Oben Sonne Sep 18 '11 at 18:25
2  
The way you put it, it seems you have some problem you want to solve, decided you would use regexes, and now you have a second, harder, and possibly unnecessary problem. If I were you, I would ask myself: "is this really necessary to achieve my goal? (whatever it may be)". –  heltonbiker Sep 21 '11 at 18:21
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8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+100

Outside of the syntax clarification on re.match, I think I am understanding that you are struggling with taking two or more unknown (user input) regex expressions and classifying which is a more 'specific' match against a string.

Recall for a moment that a Python regex really is a type of computer program. Most modern forms, including Python's regex, are based on Perl. Perl's regex's have recursion, backtracking, and other forms that defy trivial inspection. Indeed a rogue regex can be used as a form of denial of service attack.

To see of this on your own computer, try:

>>> re.match(r'^(a+)+$','a'*24+'!')

That takes about 1 second on my computer. Now increase the 24 in 'a'*24 to a bit larger number, say 28. That take a lot longer. Try 48... You will probably need to CTRL+C now. The time increase as the number of a's increase is, in fact, exponential.

You can read more about this issue in Russ Cox's wonderful paper on 'Regular Expression Matching Can Be Simple And Fast'. Russ Cox is the Goggle engineer that built Google Code Search in 2006. As Cox observes, consider matching the regex 'a?'*33 + 'a'*33 against the string of 'a'*99 with awk and Perl (or Python or PCRE or Java or PHP or ...) Awk matches in 200 microseconds but Perl would require 1015 years because of exponential back tracking.

So the conclusion is: it depends! What do you mean by a more specific match? Look at some of Cox's regex simplification techniques in RE2. If your project is big enough to write your own libraries (or use RE2) and you are willing to restrict the regex grammar used (i.e., no backtracking or recursive forms), I think the answer is that you would classify 'a better match' in a variety of ways.

If you are looking for a simple way to state that (regex_3 < regex_1 < regex_2) when matched against some string using Python or Perl's regex language, I think that the answer is it is very very hard (i.e., this problem is NP Complete)

Edit

Everything I said above is true! However, here is a stab at sorting matching regular expressions based on one form of 'specific': How many edits to get from the regex to the string. The greater number of edits (or the higher the Levenshtein distance) the less 'specific' the regex is.

You be the judge if this works (I don't know what 'specific' means to you for your application):

import re

def ld(a,b):
    "Calculates the Levenshtein distance between a and b."
    n, m = len(a), len(b)
    if n > m:
        # Make sure n <= m, to use O(min(n,m)) space
        a,b = b,a
        n,m = m,n

    current = range(n+1)
    for i in range(1,m+1):
        previous, current = current, [i]+[0]*n
        for j in range(1,n+1):
            add, delete = previous[j]+1, current[j-1]+1
            change = previous[j-1]
            if a[j-1] != b[i-1]:
                change = change + 1
            current[j] = min(add, delete, change)      
    return current[n]

s='Mary had a little lamb'    
d={}
regs=[r'.*', r'Mary', r'lamb', r'little lamb', r'.*little lamb',r'\b\w+mb',
        r'Mary.*little lamb',r'.*[lL]ittle [Ll]amb',r'\blittle\b',s,r'little']

for reg in regs:
    m=re.search(reg,s)
    if m:
        print "'%s' matches '%s' with sub group '%s'" % (reg, s, m.group(0))
        ld1=ld(reg,m.group(0))
        ld2=ld(m.group(0),s)
        score=max(ld1,ld2)
        print "  %i edits regex->match(0), %i edits match(0)->s" % (ld1,ld2)
        print "  score: ", score
        d[reg]=score
        print
    else:
        print "'%s' does not match '%s'" % (reg, s)   

print "   ===== %s =====    === %s ===" % ('RegEx'.center(10),'Score'.center(10))

for key, value in sorted(d.iteritems(), key=lambda (k,v): (v,k)):
    print "   %22s        %5s" % (key, value) 

The program is taking a list of regex's and matching against the string Mary had a little lamb.

Here is the sorted ranking from "most specific" to "least specific":

   =====   RegEx    =====    ===   Score    ===
   Mary had a little lamb            0
        Mary.*little lamb            7
            .*little lamb           11
              little lamb           11
      .*[lL]ittle [Ll]amb           15
               \blittle\b           16
                   little           16
                     Mary           18
                  \b\w+mb           18
                     lamb           18
                       .*           22

This based on the (perhaps simplistic) assumption that: a) the number of edits (the Levenshtein distance) to get from the regex itself to the matching substring is the result of wildcard expansions or replacements; b) the edits to get from the matching substring to the initial string. (just take one)

As two simple examples:

  1. .* (or .*.* or .*?.* etc) against any sting is a large number of edits to get to the string, in fact equal to the string length. This is the max possible edits, the highest score, and the least 'specific' regex.
  2. The regex of the string itself against the string is as specific as possible. No edits to change one to the other resulting in a 0 or lowest score.

As stated, this is simplistic. Anchors should increase specificity but they do not in this case. Very short stings don't work because the wild-card may be longer than the string.

Edit 2

I got anchor parsing to work pretty darn well using the undocumented sre_parse module in Python. Type >>> help(sre_parse) if you want to read more...

This is the goto worker module underlying the re module. It has been in every Python distribution since 2001 including all the P3k versions. It may go away, but I don't think it is likely...

Here is the revised listing:

import re
import sre_parse

def ld(a,b):
    "Calculates the Levenshtein distance between a and b."
    n, m = len(a), len(b)
    if n > m:
        # Make sure n <= m, to use O(min(n,m)) space
        a,b = b,a
        n,m = m,n

    current = range(n+1)
    for i in range(1,m+1):
        previous, current = current, [i]+[0]*n
        for j in range(1,n+1):
            add, delete = previous[j]+1, current[j-1]+1
            change = previous[j-1]
            if a[j-1] != b[i-1]:
                change = change + 1
            current[j] = min(add, delete, change)      
    return current[n]

s='Mary had a little lamb'    
d={}
regs=[r'.*', r'Mary', r'lamb', r'little lamb', r'.*little lamb',r'\b\w+mb',
        r'Mary.*little lamb',r'.*[lL]ittle [Ll]amb',r'\blittle\b',s,r'little',
        r'^.*lamb',r'.*.*.*b',r'.*?.*',r'.*\b[lL]ittle\b \b[Ll]amb',
        r'.*\blittle\b \blamb$','^'+s+'$']

for reg in regs:
    m=re.search(reg,s)
    if m:
        ld1=ld(reg,m.group(0))
        ld2=ld(m.group(0),s)
        score=max(ld1,ld2)
        for t, v in sre_parse.parse(reg):
            if t=='at':      # anchor...
                if v=='at_beginning' or 'at_end':
                    score-=1   # ^ or $, adj 1 edit

                if v=='at_boundary': # all other anchors are 2 char
                    score-=2

        d[reg]=score
    else:
        print "'%s' does not match '%s'" % (reg, s)   

print
print "   ===== %s =====    === %s ===" % ('RegEx'.center(15),'Score'.center(10))

for key, value in sorted(d.iteritems(), key=lambda (k,v): (v,k)):
    print "   %27s        %5s" % (key, value) 

And soted RegEx's:

   =====      RegEx      =====    ===   Score    ===
        Mary had a little lamb            0
      ^Mary had a little lamb$            0
          .*\blittle\b \blamb$            6
             Mary.*little lamb            7
     .*\b[lL]ittle\b \b[Ll]amb           10
                    \blittle\b           10
                 .*little lamb           11
                   little lamb           11
           .*[lL]ittle [Ll]amb           15
                       \b\w+mb           15
                        little           16
                       ^.*lamb           17
                          Mary           18
                          lamb           18
                       .*.*.*b           21
                            .*           22
                         .*?.*           22
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1  
Wow. Thorough explanation! –  Ethan Furman Sep 24 '11 at 4:29
    
Wow, thank you for the elaborate explanation! But like you said, simply calculating the Levenshtein distance doesn't do justice to regular expressions. For example, .*.*.* is no more (or less) specific than .*. I'm not very worried about the users creating the regular expressions because they are all internal users and every edit in the application is tracked. I'm much, much more worried about the accuracy of the matches because the scores from the matches are pushed to the customer, an incorrect match could be very embarrassing. But thanks again, your explanation was very helpful! –  user183037 Sep 25 '11 at 0:02
    
If I don't receive a more accurate answer over the weekend, I'll look at increasing the bounty and awarding it to both you and @EthanFurman. –  user183037 Sep 25 '11 at 0:06
    
@user183037: .*.*.* has the same score as .* with this ranking, so ld actually does do 'justice' to re in this case! Without massive simplification, this particular problem is intractable. All you can do is pick how you model and simplify something that is in the ball-park of what your users expect, with a common language. –  the wolf Sep 25 '11 at 3:24
    
@carrot-top: my bad then, I assumed since you were calculating Levenshtein's distance that you would have to deal with the extra length of the 3 .*s. I apologize for that rather hasty assumption - I'll look at this in more detail tomorrow and get back to you. Thank you for the clarification and thanks again for the answer. –  user183037 Sep 25 '11 at 3:30
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Is it possible to match 2 regular expressions in Python?

That certainly is possible. Use parenthetical match groups joined by | for alteration. If you arrange the parenthetical match groups by most specific regex to least specific, the rank in the returned tuple from m.groups() will show how specific your match is. You can also use named groups to name how specific your match is, such as s10 for very specific and s0 for a not so specific match.

>>> s1='google.com/maps2text'
>>> s2='I forgot my goggles at the house'
>>> s3='blah blah blah'
>>> m1=re.match(r'(^google\.com\/maps\dtext$)|(.*go[a-z]+)',s1)
>>> m2=re.match(r'(^google\.com\/maps\dtext$)|(.*go[a-z]+)',s2)
>>> m1.groups()
('google.com/maps2text', None)
>>> m2.groups()
(None, 'I forgot my goggles')
>>> patt=re.compile(r'(?P<s10>^google\.com\/maps\dtext$)|
... (?P<s5>.*go[a-z]+)|(?P<s0>[a-z]+)')
>>> m3=patt.match(s3)
>>> m3.groups()
(None, None, 'blah')
>>> m3.groupdict()
{'s10': None, 's0': 'blah', 's5': None}

If you do not know ahead of time which regex is more specific, this is a much harder problem to solve. You want to have a look at this paper covering security of regex matches against file system names.

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Nope, I've no idea what the regexes may be. It's user controlled and that's one of the challenges. Thanks for the answer and linking to the paper. The paper seems to be what I want. –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 21:41
    
Unfortunately, the paper doesn't elaborate on how the set relationships were established programmatically. Also, I believe there is a critical flaw in the way disjoint sets are eliminated. But thanks again, it was an interesting read. –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 23:17
    
With user input of unknown regex's, this is a halting problem I believe and is therefore insoluble. –  dawg Sep 23 '11 at 4:31
    
I see, well that's disappointing! But didn't the paper try to answer this same question? –  user183037 Sep 23 '11 at 7:47
    
Yes, but the paper also acknowledged that the method was an inaccurate approximation that was better than nothing... –  dawg Sep 24 '11 at 17:13
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It depends on what kind of regular expressions you have; as @carrot-top suggests, if you actually aren't dealing with "regular expressions" in the CS sense, and instead have crazy extensions, then you are definitely out of luck.

However, if you do have traditional regular expressions, you might make a bit more progress. First, we could define what "more specific" means. Say R is a regular expression, and L(R) is the language generated by R. Then we might say R1 is more specific than R2 if L(R1) is a (strict) subset of L(R2) (L(R1) < L(R2)). That only gets us so far: in many cases, L(R1) is neither a subset nor a superset of L(R2), and so we might imagine that the two are somehow incomparable. An example, trying to match "mary had a little lamb", we might find two matching expressions: .*mary and lamb.*.

One non-ambiguous solution is to define specificity via implementation. For instance, convert your regular expression in a deterministic (implementation-defined) way to a DFA and simply count states. Unfortunately, this might be relatively opaque to a user.

Indeed, you seem to have an intuitive notion of how you want two regular expressions to compare, specificity-wise. Why not simple write down a definition of specificity, based on the syntax of regular expressions, that matches your intuition reasonably well?

Totally arbitrary rules follow:

  1. Characters = 1.
  2. Character ranges of n characters = n (and let's say \b = 5, because I'm not sure how you might choose to write it out long-hand).
  3. Anchors are 5 each.
  4. * divides its argument by 2.
  5. + divides its argument by 2, then adds 1.
  6. . = -10.

Anyway, just food for thought, as the other answers do a good job of outlining some of the issues you're facing; hope it helps.

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That's a good idea! Thanks for the answer. –  user183037 Sep 27 '11 at 5:11
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I don't think it's possible.

An alternative would be to try to calculate the number of strings of length n that the regular expression also matches. A regular expression that matches 1,000,000,000 strings of length 15 characters is less specific than one that matches only 10 strings of length 15 characters.

Of course, calculating the number of possible matches is not trivial unless the regular expressions are simple.

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I agree - calculating all the different possibilities is not an option, I can't control the complexity of the regex (it's user generated). –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 18:11
    
Do you think it's not possible because such a construct doesn't exist in Python or is it because it's an inherent limitation in the way regexes are matched? –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 18:12
    
You don't need to calculate all the different possibilities. You only need to calculate the number of them. Or even just an estimate of the number. For example [0-9]{6} has 10^6 = 1,000,000 possible matches, whereas \w{6} has 62^6 possibilities, so [0-9]{6} is more specific. –  Mark Byers Sep 19 '11 at 6:16
    
I understand, but calculating the number is not really feasible because I have no control over the regular expressions and to be able to account for all the different possibilities is a mammoth task. I'm hoping there's an easier way out :) –  user183037 Sep 21 '11 at 4:43
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Option 1:

Since users are supplying the regexes, perhaps ask them to also submit some test strings which they think are illustrative of their regex's specificity. (i.e. that show their regex is more specific than a competitor's regex.) Collect all the user's submitted test strings, and then test all the regexes against the complete set of test strings.

To design a good regex, the author must have put thought into what strings match and don't match their regex, so it should be easy for them to supply good test strings.


Option 2:

You might try a Monte Carlo approach: Starting with the string that both regexes match, write a generator which generates mutations of that string (permute characters, add/remove characters, etc.) If both regexes match or don't match the same way for each mutation, then the regexes "probably tie". If one matches a mutations that the other doesn't, and vice versa, then they "absolutely tie".

But if one matches a strict superset of mutations then it is "probably less specific" than the other.

The verdict after a large number of mutations may not always be correct, but may be reasonable.


Option 3:

Use ipermute or pyParsing's invert to generate strings which match each regex. This will only work on a regexes that use a limited subset of regex syntax.

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I'm not sure how this might turn out considering the regexes could possibly be very complex. But thank you, I'll keep this in mind. –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 18:38
    
Option 1: The reasoning behind doing this is to minimize manual effort actually. If the automated matches don't work, I'm planning to push the string onto a manual queue so the user can assign the score manually. –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 19:08
1  
Option 3: '*' and '+' are not supported, and generating all permutations is not a feasible option :( But thanks a lot, really appreciate your time! –  user183037 Sep 18 '11 at 20:29
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I think you could do it by looking the result of matching with the longest result

>>> m = re.match(r'google\.com\/maps','google.com/maps/hello')
>>> len(m.group(0))
15

>>> m = re.match(r'google\.com\/maps2','google.com/maps/hello')
>>> print (m)
None

>>> m = re.match(r'google\.com\/maps','google.com/maps2/hello')
>>> len(m.group(0))
15

>>> m = re.match(r'google\.com\/maps2','google.com/maps2/hello')
>>> len(m.group(0))
16
share|improve this answer
    
That looks interesting - I'll have a go at it tomorrow and get back to you. Thank you! –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 6:27
    
Fails for m = re.match(r'.*','google.com/maps2/hello'). Printing len(m.group(0)) gives 22, a supposedly better match than others. –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 21:35
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re.match('google\.com\/maps', 'google\.com\/maps2', re.IGNORECASE)

The second item to re.match() above is a string -- that's why it's not working: the regex says to match a period after google, but instead it finds a backslash. What you need to do is double up the backslashes in the regex that's being used as a regex:

def compare_regexes(regex1, regex2):
    """returns regex2 if regex1 is 'smaller' than regex2
    returns regex1 if they are the same
    returns regex1 if regex1 is 'bigger' than regex2
    otherwise returns None"""
    regex1_mod = regex1.replace('\\', '\\\\')
    regex2_mod = regex2.replace('\\', '\\\\')
    if regex1 == regex2:
        return regex1
    if re.match(regex1_mod, regex2):
        return regex2
    if re.match(regex2_mod, regex1):
        return regex1

You can change the returns to whatever suits your needs best. Oh, and make sure you are using raw strings with re. r'like this, for example'

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Oh wow, if that works the way I think it works, it would be awesome. I'll have a go at it tomorrow and let you know how it went! And thanks for reminding me about using raw strings, I'd read it somewhere, but totally forgot about it. –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 6:20
    
Fails for print compare_regexes(r'g.+o', r'g.*o') and print compare_regexes(r'g[1-2]o', r'g[1-3]o'). But this works for a lot of others. Could you please help me understand what replacing `\\` achieves/any other elaboration is greatly appreciated, thanks! –  user183037 Sep 22 '11 at 22:31
1  
@user183037: What it's attempting to do turn the string being used as a regex (the first string) into a plain string so it can match character by character with the second string. It needs a lot of beefing up, though -- it should be adding ` before . * + { } [ ] ?` and possibly more, but not when they are inside []s. Question for you: which item from each pair that is currently failing should be returned? –  Ethan Furman Sep 24 '11 at 4:27
    
I would have expected the one with .+ and the one with [1-2] respectively to be returned. I wish I could see where you're going with this, this looks very promising. Could you please point me to a resource where I can read up on what you're doing here? :) Thanks! –  user183037 Sep 24 '11 at 23:38
    
Most of my re knowledge is from the book Mastering Regular Expressions from O'Reilly. –  Ethan Furman Sep 25 '11 at 2:37
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I realize that this is a non-solution, but as there is no unambiguous way to tell which is the "most specific match", certainly when it depends on what your users "meant", the easiest thing to do would be to ask them to provide their own priority. For example just by putting the regexes in the right order. Then you can simply take the first one that matches. If you expect the users to be comfortable with regular expressions anyway, this is maybe not too much to ask?

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The problem is, we're talking about 1000s of regular expressions and possibly 15 - 20 regular expressions (worst case) that may match a given string. I can just ask them to pick which the most specific match is if there's a collision (which will probably what I'll end up doing if I can't get EthanFurman's solution to work. –  user183037 Sep 26 '11 at 15:35
    
@user183037: you're making me curious as to what kind of application you're making. –  Steven Sep 26 '11 at 18:19
    
If you're wondering about it's feasibility/security, it's an internal app that will never be public facing. That's why I can expect the users to behave :) –  user183037 Sep 26 '11 at 18:50
    
Not really, just wondering what the actual purpose is... –  Steven Sep 26 '11 at 20:42
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