Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've the following scenario. My application interacts with the database which contains some static tables. If I have to use that static information in the code level mostly for conditional code, what is the best approach.

For eg: I've a student database, which contains a static table student_type ( indicating hard-working, smart, lazy etc types ). In the code, I need to take action based on the student_type.

So, my code would look like this

studentTypeId = student.getTypeId(); // student constructed from database
switch (studentTypeId)
{
    case HARDWORKING_ID :
       // do something
    case LAZY_ID :
       // do something
    break;
}

Well, in my code, I would either use constants or an enum to store type ids. But, isn't this kind of replicating things in code since I already have type ids in database. If the type id in database changes I'll have to change the same in my Enum which increases maintenance. Is there a better way to achieve this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The question to ask is: does the addition of the row in the database imply a change in your java? If yes, go for the enum approach, and don't worry about the duplication. If you're going to have to change code anyway, for instance, to add new cases to your switch, then I usually find it's a good idea to keep things simple.

studentTypeId = student.getTypeId(); // student constructed from database
switch (studentTypeId)
{
    case HARDWORKING_ID :
       // do something
    case LAZY_ID :
       // do something
    case SMART_ID :     // added smart student, very rare corner case :-)
       // do something
    break;
}

Often in cases where you're storing static data like this you've got other constraints that go with the data, and when you change the data in the database, you have to change the code that uses that data.

If you really really want to reduce the duplication, then you can go for a fully pluggable architecture, as suggested by Dave Newton. This could be implemented as a id -> class name relation for each id. You'd then instantiate the class and all of the logic associated with each id would be contained in that class. This isn't always easy or possible. For your example, it may well be possible, but unless it's done right, this can be complicated.

Also, it doesn't solve all of your problems. You still have to develop the java, test it, and redeploy the new class. So actually, the amount of work you would save may be minimal.

It's often easier to accept the small amount of duplication and just go with the simple solution.

share|improve this answer

If the student_type table contains only some ID's and perhaps some descriptive text but nothing more as in this small example

   ID    description
    1    'Hard worker'
    2    'Lazy snob'

then your only chance is to use the IDs in your code, perhaps giving them proper names using either an enum or some constant interface as you did already. And every change on `student_type' which requires a change in behaviour will require code changes. There is no way out, because the only place where behaviour is formalized and defined is in your code.

IF however the table has formalized content like here

   ID    description    min_    max_   min_  max_  fire_   give_
                      points  points  grade grade  ASAP    kudos
    1    'Hard worker'   100     200      B     A     F        T
    2    'Lazy snob'       0      50      Z     Q     T        F
    3    'Medium'         50     100      P     C     F        F

then the behaviour of your app is not driven by the ID but by the associated data - the data forms a simple rule system. In that case you don't need any constants in your code, because you will implement the rule system like this:

    StudentType studentType = student.getStudentType();
    if( studentType.isGiveKudos() )
        doGiveKudos(student);
    if( studentType.isFireAsap() )
        doFire(student);
    // next student...

This is the way to go if the flexibility is a must.

scratch head Now I don't know if this deviates to much from the question.

share|improve this answer

There's a bunch of ways this could be implemented. For quick/dirty stuff I'll often store the class name of an implementation in the DB and just instantiate at runtime. Sometimes I'll keep a Groovy implementation in the DB. Sometimes I'll use Spring beans where the factory is stored in the DB. All depends.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.