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I am kind of a newbie to Ruby, I am working out some katas and I stuck on this silly problem. I need to copy the content of 1 file to a new file in 1 line of code

First try:

File.open(out, 'w').write(File.open(in).read)

Nice, but it's wrong I need to close the files:

File.open(out, 'w') { |outf| outf.write(File.open(in).read) }

And then of course close the read:

File.open(out, 'w') { |outf| File.open(in) { |inf| outf.write(outf.read)) } }

This is what I come up with, but it does not look like 1 line of code to me :(

Ideas?

Regards,

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2  
Does FileUtils, File.copy count ? – Calin Sep 18 '11 at 20:11
    
i dont see any line breaks or semi colons..... – Matt Briggs Sep 18 '11 at 20:12
    
@matt I know, but if I have to be right to myself I will have to put some line breaks there – Calin Sep 18 '11 at 20:15
up vote 10 down vote accepted

There are many ways. You could simply invoke the command line for example:

`cp path1 path2`

But I guess you're looking for something like:

File.open('foo.txt', 'w') { |f| f.write(File.read('bar.txt')) }
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this was my second option, but how about File.read('bar.txt'), doesn't it need to close ? – Calin Sep 18 '11 at 20:36
    
It's done automatically for you. – Oscar Del Ben Sep 18 '11 at 20:41
    
you mean like this stackoverflow.com/questions/4795447/… – Calin Sep 18 '11 at 20:57
    
I think for the purpose of a code kata that's good enough. – Oscar Del Ben Sep 18 '11 at 21:42

Ruby 1.9.3 and later has a

File.write(name, string, [offset], open_args)

command that allows you to write a file directly. name is the name of the file, string is what you want to write, and the other arguments are above my head.

Some links for it: https://github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/ruby_1_9_3/NEWS , http://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/1081 (scroll to the bottom).

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You can do the following:

File.open(out_file, "w") {|f| f.write IO.read(in_file)}
share|improve this answer

You can try:

IO.binwrite('to-filename', IO.binread('from-filename'))

Check the ruby docs:

IO::binwrite & IO::binread

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