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So I'm a little confused here. I'm working on a bigger project, but ran into a few problems, so I wrote a little test case using a simple struct:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct{
    int property1;
}test;

int main(){
    test testing = getNumber();
    printf("%d",testing.property1);
    return 0;
}

test getNumber(){
    test testing = {2};
    return testing;
}

All I'm trying to do is read a property from the test struct returned from getNumber(). However, the compiler complains with the following error:

test.c(8) : error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from 'int' to 'test'

So my question is: why is this function trying to return an int despite me specifying a test return type? How do I fix this? Am I just blind to something simple?

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11  
You're missing a prototype – Paul R Sep 18 '11 at 20:25
    
Oh geez.. I can't believe I missed that. Thanks lol. wow. – BraedenP Sep 18 '11 at 20:27
2  
@PaulR: I 'd hate to see that being copy/pasted into the answer box by someone else. – Jon Sep 18 '11 at 20:27
1  
@Paul R: With slight elaboration, that's the answer. Please post it as such. – delnan Sep 18 '11 at 20:27
3  
You might want to crank up your compiler's warning flags to 11, just gcc -Wall would have told you your real problem. – mu is too short Sep 18 '11 at 20:32
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're missing a prototype:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct{
    int property1;
}test;

test getNumber(void); // <<< missing prototype

int main(){
    test testing = getNumber();
    printf("%d",testing.property1);
    return 0;
}

test getNumber(void){
    test testing = {2};
    return testing;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes -- or you could just define getNumber before main. In the absence of recursion, there's always an order that makes separate declarations unnecessary. Which is preferred is matter of taste and style. – Keith Thompson Sep 18 '11 at 21:08

The error message here is a bit ambiguous. The default return type of a c function is int. Compiler is reporting that it cannot make the conversion from int to test. But in fact, it failed because it didn't know what getNumber() is. Compiler error message should have been a bit clearer saying undefined call to getNumber() or some thing on those lines.

C compiler works on a top to bottom approach. What ever variables used, function calls made should be known to it before hand. So when compiler sees the following statement -

test testing = getNumber();

until this point it doesn't know what getNumber() is. So, you have two options making compiler happy.

  1. Either forward declare the function declaration.
  2. Or move the function definition above main().
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