Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to develop a random number "generator" in F#.

I successfully created the following function:

let draw () =
    let rand = new Random()
    rand.Next(0,36)

This works fine and it generates a number between 0 and 36.

However, I am trying to create a function that runs this function several times.

I tried the following

let multipleDraws (n:int) =
    [for i in 1..n -> draw()]

However, I only get a single result, as draw is evaluated only once in the for comprehension.

How could I force multiple executions of the draw function?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem is with the Random type. It uses the computer's time to generate a seed and then generate the random numbers. Since practically the time of the calls is identical, the same seed is generated and so are also same numbers returned.

This will solve your problem:

let draw =
    let rand = new Random()
    fun () ->
    rand.Next(0,36)

And then:

let multipleDraws (n:int) =
    [for i in 1..n -> draw()]
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks, but I don't understand, using you solution, why don't I still have the same problem with the seed? –  SRKX Sep 18 '11 at 21:46
    
When calling the constructor of Random, you generate a seed based on the current computer's time. Then, every call to the Next method generates a new seed based on the previous seed, and not based on the time. Since you don't depend on the time anymore, it does not matter that your calls are done at the same machine time. –  Ramon Snir Sep 18 '11 at 22:22
2  
@SRKK: You may want to add printfn "draw is called" as a first line of draw body to see what's going on: you'll see only one output. Your draw function returned integers, while one in the answer returns anonymous function with signature (unit -> int) that actually gets called within the list comprehension. This anonymous function captures the rand value into a closure, rand itself gets seeded only once. –  Gene Belitski Sep 18 '11 at 22:45
    
@SRKX: You might want to google for the "clojure" term. Here you capture the rand variable in the new anonymous function fun () -> rand.Next(0, 36), and then you return this new function. So calling draw() returns new function to call later. After that when you call this anonymous function multiple times it is using the single captured variable rand, the rand isn't recreated. –  Dmitry Lobanov Sep 20 '11 at 5:29

Adding this to help explain Ramon's answer.

This code uses a lambda function.

let draw =
    let rand = new Random()
    fun () ->
    rand.Next(0,36)

It may be easier to understand what's happening if you give the lambda function a name.

let draw =
    let rand = new Random()
    let next() =
        rand.Next(0,36)
    next

The variable draw is being assigned the function next. You can move rand and next out of the scope of draw to see the assignment directly.

let rand = new Random()
let next() =
    rand.Next(0,36)
let draw = next

You can see from the above code that in Ramon's answer new Random is only called once while it is called many times in SRKX's example.

As mentioned by Ramon Random generates a sequence of numbers based on a random seed. It will always generate the same sequence of numbers if you use the same seed. You can pass random a seed like this new Random(2). If you do not pass it a value it uses the current time. So if you call new Random multiple times in a row without a seed it will most likely have the same seed (because the time hasn't changed). If the seed doesn't change then the first random number of the sequence will always be the same. If you try SRKX's original code and call multipleDraws with a large enough number, then the time will change during the loop and you will get back a sequence of numbers that changes every so often.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the additional explanation! it makes it even more clear. –  SRKX Sep 19 '11 at 9:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.