Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sure I saw a post on Meta or SO where Jeff posted the upgraded algorithm which matches comments better, for example when someone types a comment:

@Tom did you see

It will match username 'Tom'. If there are special characters, say my username is 'T0m' and someone types @Tom it still matches.

Does anyone have a link to this post if it does indeed exist? If I recall correctly it was code he shared, and would be useful for me!

Otherwise, given a list of usernames who are involved in the discussion:

users[0] = "Tom"
users[1] = "Peanut"
users[2] = "Ashley"
users[3] = "Jon"
users[4] = "AARÓN"

And you are given @Aaron or @Aron as an input, what's the best way to select the correct user being referred to in the list?

A general algorithm would be fine, but the site I'm doing it for is ASP.net c# so if there's an example in that language it would be brilliant. This is what I have so far, it works great for EXACT matches (all lowercase):

// Find comment references
if (Search.Type != Alerts.SectionType.error)
{
    // A list of all lower case usernames refered to in this thread
    string[] References = Alerts.CommonFunctions.extractReferences(Comment);

    // Only proceed if any references are found
    if (References.Count() > 0)
    {
        // Extract all usernames involved in this comment discussion
        UserBasic[] UsernamesInThread = getAllUsernamesInThread(Anchor);

        // Loop each reference
        foreach (string r in References)
        {
            // Try to find a match
            foreach (UserBasic u in UsernamesInThread)
            {
                // Exact match found
                if (r == u.Username)
                {
                    // Check it's not original author (we can then ignore as alert already issued)
                    if (u.UserID != Search.OriginalAuthorID)
                    {
                        Alerts.CommonFunctions.createAlert(u.UserID, Settings.CommentReplyAlertID, Search.URL, Search.Title);
                    }
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps this? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levenshtein_distance –  Ian Mercer Sep 18 '11 at 22:02
    
Don't forget letter spacing - e should match r more than l. –  gladsocc Sep 18 '11 at 22:02

1 Answer 1

Peter Norvig wrote a beautiful example of a very small spelling corrector here:

It has two C# implementations listed.

For your specific problem (where the set of candidates is very small), you might want to find the minimal edit distance between the target word and all of the candidates.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.