Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I only want to remove a value.. I don't need to use the variable afterwards. Why not include an overload where this second parameter was not required?

Do I really have to just store it in a temporary local variable, not use it, and have the garbage collector collect it when the method ends? Seems rather silly..

The function: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd287129.aspx

share|improve this question
1  
How is the GC relevant here? It can collect the value once TryRemove returns. –  CodesInChaos Sep 18 '11 at 22:54
    
I'm guessing: concurrency and strong exception guarantees. The interface is pure in that it returns the item exactly as it was removed: no information can get lost and the operation is undoable by definition. Think of value types as well. –  sehe Sep 18 '11 at 23:08
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can create exactly the method you want:

public static class ConcurrentDictionaryEx {
  public static bool TryRemove<TKey, TValue>(
    this ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue> self, TKey key) {
    TValue ignored;
    return self.TryRemove(key, out ignored);
  }
}

UPDATE: Or, as Dialecticus mentioned in the comments, just use Remove. But note that, since it's an explicit interface implementation, you'll need a reference to an IDictionary<TKey, TValue>, which leads you back to creating an extension method if you want to avoid casting a ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue> reference:

public static class ConcurrentDictionaryEx {
  public static bool Remove<TKey, TValue>(
    this ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue> self, TKey key) {
      return ((IDictionary<TKey, TValue>)self).Remove(key);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Eh.. Why is this not included in the framework? I'm more curious as to why they would not simply include it by default. –  John Smith Sep 18 '11 at 22:51
    
Well, maybe they didn't think it was a common enough case to warrant a special case method. Maybe because it's so easy to derive it like the way I did. I don't really know. –  Jordão Sep 18 '11 at 22:53
1  
@JohnSmith, TryRemove is used if you want to take the value and remove the key at the same time. If you don't care about the value then just use Remove. –  Dialecticus Jan 22 '13 at 17:22
    
@Dialecticus: good catch! I thought Remove would throw if the key wasn't found. I thought that the TryRemove indicated that, but I was wrong. I'll update the answer. –  Jordão Jan 22 '13 at 17:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.