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My assignment says:

---Rewrite the program by grouping the calculations into functions. In particular, you should introduce at least the following functions:

---A function named toLowerCase that takes a single character as an input parameter and returns a character. The returned value should be identical to the input unless the input is an upper-case letter, in which case the returned value should be the lower-case equivalent to that letter.

---Another function named toLowerCase, this one taking a string as an input parameter and returning a string. The returned string should be identical to the input except that all upper-case letters have been converted to lowercase.

----A function named readText that takes a string as an output parameter (no return value) and that reads multiple lines of input from cin until either hitting end-of-input or encountering an empty line. (Note: readText should not write anything to cout.)

----A function named countCharacter that takes two parameters as input and return an integer. The first input parameter will be a string and the second a character. The returned value should be the number of time that character occurs in the string (zero if the character occurs nowhere in the string). This function should work as described for all legal characters (i.e., even though this program will only use it to count lower-case letters, it should work for lower-case letters, upper-case letters, punctuation, etc.) As you introduce each function, replace the code in main() by calls to your new functions as appropriate.

I keep getting error: expected primary-expression before char

#include<iomanip>
#include<iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

 void readText(string& text);
 void toLowercase(string& text);
 void countcharacter(string& text, char []);
 char ToLowerCase();


int main (int argc, char** argv)
{

  string userinput; //Initialize string name userinput

  cout << "Enter text to be analyzed, ending with an empty line or end-of-input:" <<     endl;

 readText(userinput); //Read text from user

cout << "You've entered: \n" << userinput << '\n'; // Read input, line by line, until end of input or an empty line

toLowercase(userinput); //Output user input and if upper-case, convert to lower-case

 cout << "Lower case version of what you said: \n" << userinput << '\n';

 countcharacter(userinput); //Count characters in userinput

 ToLowerCase();

  return 0;
}


void readText(string& text)
{

 string line;
 getline (cin, line);


while (cin && line != "")
{
  text = text + line + "\n";
  getline (cin, line);
}

 /*for(std::string line; getline(std::cin, line) && !'\n' ; )

    input += line + '\n'; */
}

void toLowercase(string& text)
{

  const int ucLcOffset = 'a' - 'A';
  for (int i = 0; i < text.size(); ++i)
{
  char c = text[i];
  if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
text[i] = text[i] + ucLcOffset;
}

}

void countcharacter(string& text, char c)
{
// Count and report on each alphabetic character
  int totalCount = 0;

  for (c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; ++c)
    {
  // Count how many times c occurs in the text
      int charCount = 0;
          for (int i = 0; i < text.size(); ++i)
       {
         if (text[i] == c)
         ++charCount;
       }
  // report on character c
      cout << c << ":" << charCount << " " << flush;
      if ((c - 'a') % 10 == 9)
    cout << "\n";
      totalCount = totalCount + charCount;
    }
 // How many characters are left over?
     cout << "\nother:" << text.size() - totalCount << endl;



}

char ToLowerCase()
{

 char c = 'A';
 char Conversion;
 const int ucLcOffset = 'a' - 'A';

     if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
    Conversion = c + ucLcOffset;

    cout << "Your conversion for character A is: " << Conversion << '\n';

} 

Line 28 error. 'countcharacter(userinput); //Count characters in userinput'

share|improve this question
    
Have you pointed out which line of code gives you the error? –  K-ballo Sep 19 '11 at 0:35
    
do you mind telling us the line where the error occurs? –  slartibartfast Sep 19 '11 at 0:36
2  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the faq. Homework questions are expected to be tagged as such. –  Holger Just Sep 19 '11 at 0:40
    
line 28 error "countcharacter(userinput); –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:46
    
@Sam: What is the problem? What exactly do you need help with. It is unlikely that we will do you homework, but if you are nice we may point you in the correct direction. –  Loki Astari Sep 19 '11 at 1:28

4 Answers 4

#inlcude<iostream>

You spelt include wrong.

 countcharacter(userinput); //Count characters in userinput

countcharacter() takes two parameters, not one.

It seems you want to count the occurrences of each lower case character ('a'-'z'). In this case you don't need to pass a second argument to countcharacter(). Change:

void countcharacter(string& text, char []);

to

void countcharacter(string& text);

and

void countcharacter(string& text, char []);

to

void countcharacter(string& text);

You will also have to declare char c in countcharacter().

It also seems you should change char ToLowerCase() to void ToLowerCase() as you don't seem to be returning anything.

share|improve this answer
    
no matter what parameter I put in there, I get the same error. Im trying to understand c++ and this is confusing me. I tried countcharacter(userinput, char c). Same error –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:39
    
Excellent! Exactly the same as my answer, but an extra upvote! –  Johnsyweb Sep 19 '11 at 0:41
    
@Sam what is countcharacter() meant to do. It seems like it's meant to count the occurrences of a character but you call it as if you're trying to count the length of a string? –  quasiverse Sep 19 '11 at 0:42
    
@quasiverse How can I change that. Yes I am trying to count the occurences of the specified character in the string. I'm kinda new and this is confusing –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:45
    
@Sam What character are you trying to count the occurrences of? I can't tell from your code. –  quasiverse Sep 19 '11 at 0:46

Post the exact code you fed to your compiler. You wouldn't get "error: expected primary-expression before char" for what you posted, you'd get "error: invalid preprocessing directive #inlcude".

Copy-and-paste it, don't re-type it.

EDIT: fixed errror message

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, I don't see how they are different? –  K-ballo Sep 19 '11 at 0:40
    
huh? there is no difference, that is my code –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:42
    
@K-ballo: My apologies, that was a copy-and-paste error on my part. I've fixed it. My point is that the original code (which I see has now been corrected) would not produce the error message the original poster indicated. –  Keith Thompson Sep 19 '11 at 0:45
    
I fixed that, this is my first time on this website and was playing with it, code is updated now –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:48

The line:

#inlcude<iostream>

Should be:

#include <iostream>

Syntax highlighting is your friend.

Also... countcharacter() takes two arguments:

void countcharacter(string& text, char []);

But you only provide one:

countcharacter(userinput);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I suppose I'm morally obliged... ;) –  quasiverse Sep 19 '11 at 0:43

I'm not a C++ guru, but the line

void countcharacter(string& text, char []);

Appears to be missing a parameter name.

share|improve this answer
1  
right line, wrong reason. The declaration and definition differs, one is with "char[]" and other is with "char". Parameter name may be omitted in declaration, but argument types in declaration and definition should be same. –  osgx Sep 19 '11 at 0:37
2  
Parameter names are optional, even more so in declarations. In definitions they are also optional, with the caveat that you cannot use them if you don't name them. It is usual to not name unused parameters to avoid compiler warnings about unused parameters. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 19 '11 at 0:40
    
Please explain a little more, I'm new to c++, still learning. –  Sam Sep 19 '11 at 0:47
    
@osgx, there we go! I wasn't sure if they were, hence my qualification that I'm not much of a C++ guy. Looks like a blind squirrel finds an acorn every once in a while ;-) –  Chris Thompson Sep 19 '11 at 16:02

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