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I have a Java program which is supposed to remove all non-letter characters from a string, except when they are a smiley face such as =) or =] or :P

It's very easy to match the opposite with [a-zA-Z ]|=\)|=\]|:P but I cannot figure out how to negate this expression. Since I am using the String.replaceAll() function it must be in the negated form.

I believe part of the issue may come from the fact that smiles are generally 2 characters long, and I am only matching 1 character at a time?

Interestingly, replaceAll("(?![Tt])[Oo]","") removes every occurrence of the letter O, even in the word "to." Does this mean my replaceAll function does not understand regex lookahead? It doesn't throw any errors...

I ended up using

replaceAll("(?<![=:;])[\\]\\[\\(\\)\\/]","")
.replaceAll("[=:;](?![\\]\\[\\(\\)o0OpPxX\\/])","")
.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z=:;\\(\\)\\[\\]\\/ ]","")

which is extremely messy but works perfectly. The... quick! (brown) fox jump's over the[] lazy dog. :] =O ;X becomes THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS OVER THE LAZY DOG :] =O ;X

Edit: Ignore that fix, see the accepted answer below.

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1  
Interesting! Note that :-) and >:^} are over 2 characters. :) –  TrueWill Sep 19 '11 at 1:30
    
Is that a troll? I did include the word "generally" –  Kevin Sep 19 '11 at 1:32
    
TrueWill's statement seems factual and non-troll-like to me. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 19 '11 at 2:10
    
Why use regexes over simple pattern matches? Just build a table of smilies, and iterate across the characters in the string. Test at that index against possible smilies. If not, remove it. If yes, skip that many characters. Repeat. –  Thomas Eding Sep 19 '11 at 5:24
2  
I did not intend to troll. I did +1 the question, but wanted to note that it is open-ended unless one defines precisely what a "smiley" is. See for instance Western emoticons. –  TrueWill Sep 19 '11 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It should be pretty easy to due this using a negative lookahead. Basically the match will fail at any position where the regex inside of the (?!...) group matches. You should follow the negative lookahead with a single wildcard (.) to consume a character if the lookahead did not match (meaning that the next character is a non-letter character that is not part of a smiley face).

edit: Clearly I hadn't tested my original regex very thoroughly, you also need a negative lookbehind following the . to make sure that the character you consumed was not the second character in a smiley:

(?![a-zA-Z ]|=\)|=\]|:P).(?<!=\)|=\]|:P)

Note that you might be able to shorten the regex by using character classes for the eyes and the mouth, for example:

[:=][\(\)\[\]]
  ^    ^-----mouth
  |--eyes
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'Testing. =] =) :P don't (fail)!' becomes 'Testing = = :P dont fail' –  Kevin Sep 19 '11 at 1:41
    
I also tried with an extra set of parenthesis (?!([a-zA-Z ]|=)|=]|:P)). and it still does not work. –  Kevin Sep 19 '11 at 3:46
    
Interestingly, replaceAll("(?![Tt])[Oo]","") removes every occurrence of the letter O, even in the word "to." Does this mean my replaceAll function does not understand regex lookahead? It doesn't throw any errors –  Kevin Sep 19 '11 at 5:00
1  
@Kevin - I just edited my answer and it should now be working properly, sorry about that. The reason your above regex is replacing every occurrence of O is that the lookahead does not consume any characters, so you regex could be described as "match if the next character is not a T, and is an O". If you want to match every O that is not preceded by a T, you should use a negative lookbehind: (?<![Tt])[Oo] ("match if the previous character is not a T, and the next character is an O"). –  Andrew Clark Sep 19 '11 at 16:29
    
That makes sense now, I was thinking of it incorrectly. Thank you for explaining. –  Kevin Sep 19 '11 at 18:24

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