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So, I'm kind of new to multithreading and socket programming, especially in C#.

Anyways, I'm trying to create a program that creates each new accepted TcpClient as a new thread.

This is what I made:

    public static void Listen()
    {
        try
        {
            listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, port);
            listener.Start();

            while (true)
            {
                t = new Thread((client = listener.AcceptTcpClient));

            }
        }
        catch { Listen(); }
    }

I also have already declared listener as a TcpListener, t as a Thread, and client as a TcpClient.

The code is fine, except for where I create the thread, it gives me an error.

My ultimate goal is to create a new thread for each accepted connection, then be able to send data to a specific connection.

So, how do I create each connection/client in a new thread? How do I reference a certain thread/connection from another method called Send (to send the data over a stream to a specific thread/connection only)?

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what is the error? –  Shane Wealti Sep 19 '11 at 3:06
    
-1 for mentioning an error, but not giving any more information. What is the error? Is it an exception? where does it error? –  Alastair Pitts Sep 19 '11 at 3:13
    
It comes up with multiple errors, but it all revolves around it not being the right "type" to start a new thread with. –  Jacob Sep 19 '11 at 3:14

4 Answers 4

Since you mention that you are new to threading and sockets I will recommend a change in approach. Creating a new thread per incoming connection will not scale well. 1000 users results in 1000 threads and your server will spend most of it's time context switching. Instead you should consider using async I/O methods (e.g. TcpListener.BeginAcceptTcpClient). The callback that you provide to this method will be invoked on a .NET thread pool thread only when it is required to do something. Just be sure to synchronize access to instance variables (e.g. via a lock statement) since if two clients connect simultaneously the callbacks may run in parallel (which is, of course, the goal). Best of luck.

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Here's my start method for a socket server sample I had. Note new thread takes new ThreadStart as an argument. I can send more of the sample if needed.

It uses ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkitem instead of using a thread per request. Look at the listener.

    public void Start()
    {
        m_protocol = LoadProtocolPlugIn();

        // Create a TcpListener to accept client connection requests
        TcpListener tcpListener = new TcpListener(m_address, m_port);
        tcpListener.Start();

        //
        // Create a protocol listener per thread
        //
        for (int i = 0; i < m_listeners; i++)
        {
            ProtocolListener listener = new ProtocolListener(tcpListener, m_protocol);
            Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(listener.Start));
            thread.Start();

            Console.WriteLine("Listening on thread: {0}", thread.Name);
        }

        m_state = ServerState.Started;
    }

and here's the protocol listener:

class ProtocolListener
{
    TcpListener m_listener;
    IProtocol   m_protocol = null;
    TcpClient   m_client = null;

    internal ProtocolListener(TcpListener listener, IProtocol protocol)
    {
        m_listener = listener;
        m_protocol = protocol;
    }

    internal void Start()
    {
        //
        // Block waiting for socket connection and then process.  Repeat in endless loop.
        //
        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                m_client = m_listener.AcceptTcpClient();
                ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem (new WaitCallback(ProcessClientProtocol), m_protocol);
            }
            catch (SocketException se)
            {
                // TODO: replace with logging and event log
                Console.WriteLine("Exception = " +  se.Message);
            }
        }
    }

    private void ProcessClientProtocol (object protocol)
    {
        Debug.Assert(m_client != null);
        Debug.Assert(protocol != null);

        ((IProtocol)protocol).Client = m_client;
        ((IProtocol)protocol).ProcessClient();
    }
}
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This is not a very good way to do things. You should look at the either the BeginXXX/EndXXX pattern or the Async pattern for sockets.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bbx2eya8.aspx

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The Thread constructor takes a delegate, while you are trying to give it an object. When you create a thread, you need to provide a method to be executed in that thread. For example:

private void HandleClient(TcpClient client)
{
   // ... 
}

However, it is usually a bad idea to create your own threads. You should use ThreadPool or Task Parallel Library, if you are using .NET 4:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(() => HandleClient(acceptedClient));

or

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => HandleClient(acceptedClient));
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