Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a log file with lines like this:

...timestamp...(id=1234)..GO...
...timestamp...(id=1234)..DONE...

Facts:

  • timestamps are of the form HH:MM:SS.ssss (s for partial seconds)
  • each 'id' number has two associated lines, a "GO" and a "DONE"
  • two associated lines are not necessarily next to each other; the file is chronological

What I want:

  • match up associated GO/DONE lines
  • diff the timestamps
  • (ideally) create a new file of the form:

    diffTime <GO line> <DONE line>
    

My main sticking point is diffing the timestamps. This would be really useful and I lack the sort/sed/awk skills to write it. Are there log file tools to help with this kind of hacking?

share|improve this question
    
If you have access to GNU's awk, then you have Timestamp Functions at your disposal. –  Johnsyweb Sep 19 '11 at 3:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know any such tools but it is possible to write it in shell. For example, this log:

11:18:51 (id=123) GO
11:18:52 (id=124) GO
11:18:53 (id=123) DONE
11:18:54 (id=125) GO
11:18:55 (id=125) DONE
11:18:55 (id=124) DONE

Can be transformed to

2 123
3 124
1 125

Where first column is time in seconds and second column is a transaction id.

Command was:

cat example.log
| sed 's|\([^ ]\+\) (id=\([^)]\+\)) \(.\+\)|\1 \2 \3|;s|GO|1|;s|DONE|2|'
| sort -k2,3
| paste - -
| tr ':' ' '
| awk '{printf("%d %d\n", ((($6-$1)*60*60)+(($7-$2)*60)+($8-$3)), $4)}'

This one-liner probably may be simplified even more.

How it works:

  • change line format to "11:18:51 123 GO"
  • replaces GO with 1 and DONE with 2 (because in later it allow to us sort it properly)
  • sorts result lines by transaction id and status
  • join each 2 lines (now each result line describes transaction starts and ends)
  • replace all colons to spaces (to simplify awk expessions later)
  • calculate time diff by manually dividing
  • prints result
share|improve this answer

Here's a script that will get you halfway there:

#!/bin/bash

# Script must be called with one parameter, the name of the file to process
if [ $# -ne 1 ]; then
  echo "Usage: $0 filename"
  exit
fi

filename=$1


# Use sed to put the timestamp after the id
#    10:46:01:0000 (id=20) GO
#    10:46:02:0000 (id=10) GO
#    10:46:03:0000 (id=10) DONE
#    10:46:04:0000 (id=20) DONE
#
#  becomes
#
#    (id=20) 10:46:01:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:02:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:03:0000 DONE
#    (id=20) 10:46:04:0000 DONE
#
# \1 timestamp
# \2 id
# \3 status (GO or DONE)
#         \1          \2              \3
sed -e "s/\([0-9:]*\) \((id=[0-9]*)\) \(.*\)/\2 \1 \3/" $filename > temp1


# Now sort the file. This will cause timestamps to be sorted, grouped by id
#    (id=20) 10:46:01:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:02:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:03:0000 DONE
#    (id=20) 10:46:04:0000 DONE
#
#  becomes
#
#    (id=10) 10:46:02:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:03:0000 DONE
#    (id=20) 10:46:01:0000 GO
#    (id=20) 10:46:04:0000 DONE
sort temp1 > temp2


# Use sed to put the id after the timestamp
#    (id=10) 10:46:02:0000 GO
#    (id=10) 10:46:03:0000 DONE
#    (id=20) 10:46:01:0000 GO
#    (id=20) 10:46:04:0000 DONE
#
#  becomes
#
#    10:46:02:0000 (id=10) GO
#    10:46:03:0000 (id=10) DONE
#    10:46:01:0000 (id=20) GO
#    10:46:04:0000 (id=20) DONE
# \1 id
# \2 timestamp
# \3 status (GO or DONE)
sed -e "s/\((id=[0-9]*)\) \([0-9:]*\) \(.*\)/\2 \1 \3/" temp2 > temp3

And for the rest... after running this script, each GO line will be followed by a DONE line with the same id, assuming that such a DONE line exists.

Next you can read each pair of lines, extract the timestamps and diff them (check out the timestamp functions that Johnsyweb suggested). Then consolidate the two lines into one line. Your results will now look something like:

#    1s 10:46:02:0000 (id=10) GO 10:46:03:0000 (id=10) DONE
#    3s 10:46:01:0000 (id=20) GO 10:46:04:0000 (id=20) DONE

Notice how the entries are out of order by the starting timestamp. This happened because we sorted by id earlier. I'll leave it as an exercise for you to figure out how to get the entries in the correct order. We want the entry for id=20 to come before id=10, because id=20 was started before id=10.

#    3s 10:46:01:0000 (id=20) GO 10:46:04:0000 (id=20) DONE
#    1s 10:46:02:0000 (id=10) GO 10:46:03:0000 (id=10) DONE

I'm sure this is confusing, so let me know if you have questions. I'm sure there are more efficient ways to do all this, but this is what I thought of off the top of my head.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can get rid of the first sed step and sort directly by the second field: sort -k2 .... Also, I would add the -s option to make the sort stable, in case there are multiple entries with the same id and timestamp. –  Eugene Beresovksy Sep 2 '13 at 8:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.