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Lets say I have a method which controls some character movement like the following:

void Player::moveRight( Uint32 ticks ) 
{ 
    if( speedx < maxspeed ) { speedx += accel; }
    x += speedx * ( ticks / 1000.f );
    //collision
    if( x > (float)( 800 - width ) ) { x = (float)( 800 - width ); }
}

maxspeed = 300 and accel = 2 ( also, speedx starts at 0 )

Now there is nothing wrong with this, until I add in a constant deceleration / friction into the equation. Basically, I have a constant deceleration of 1 which is subtracted from the speed each frame. This is so if the character is not moving, they come to a gradual stop.

The problem is this: If speedx = 299 because of the deceleration, my if statement is still true, and it proceeds to add accel which brings up the speed to 301, past the maxspeed.

What would be some good solutions to this problem, which will allow me to have any acceleration and deceleration values and not trip up the if statement?

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1  
Take note that your acceleration is per tick while speed is per time. (this will make accepartion behave differently on different frame rates while speed will act the same) –  Dani Sep 19 '11 at 4:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change it to:

if (speedx + accel > maxspeed) { speed = maxspeed; }
else speed += accel;

In this case, if acceleration causes the speed to go over the maximum it will simply set the speed to the maximum. Otherwise is will simply accelerate as normal.

Or, you could do:

speedx = min(speedx + accel, maxspeed);
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To reverse and consolidate quasiverse's answer, you could use:

speedx = min(maxspeed, speedx + accel);

This will add or cap as appropriate, with very trivial code.

The advantage over most of the current suggestions is that it only performs the addition once, or performs a single comparison.

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What do I have to include to have min() work? math? –  grep Sep 19 '11 at 5:02
    
@Headspin #include <algorithm> –  quasiverse Sep 19 '11 at 5:09
    
"it only performs the addition once, or performs a single comparison.": It performs the addition once and it performs a single comparison. The addition is superfluous if the object's speed is pegged at the max speed most of the time. If performance matters, it might be better to perform this assignment only if speedx is less than maxspeed. If performance doesn't matter there's no reason to think of adding this extra complexity to the code. –  David Hammen Sep 19 '11 at 5:22

Simplest fix is probably to clip the speed after you adjust it:

void Player::moveRight( Uint32 ticks ) 
{ 
    speedx += accel;
    if( speedx >= maxspeed ) { speedx = maxspeed }
    x += speedx * ( ticks / 1000.f );
    //collision
    if( x > (float)( 800 - width ) ) { x = (float)( 800 - width ); }
}
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Option 1: Truncate your speedx at the maxspeed. The code is compact.

speedx += accel;
if (speedx > maxspeed) { speedx = maxspeed; }

Option 2: Protect against a spurious addition when you don't need it.

if (speedx < maxspeed) {
  speedx += accel;
  if (speedx > maxspeed) { speedx = maxspeed; }
}

The former will waste an addition when you are at maxspeed. The latter wastes a comparison when you are below maxspeed-accel. Which is better depends on which scenario is more likely.

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Simply clamping the speedx seems like it would work fine:

if ( speedx < maxspeed ) { speedx = min(speedx+accel,maxspeed); }
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