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I want to save the local time to a char variable. here is the code i have used. but it is saying

"cannot convert char * to char"

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

struct tme
{
  char intime;
}e;
void main( )
{

  char timeStr [9];
 _strtime( timeStr );
  e.intime=timeStr;
  printf( "The current time is %s \n", timeStr);
 }

Thanx in advance.

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Be informed that _strtime is a Windows function, rendering your code snippet non-standard-compliant. Kindly consider using const time_t current = time( NULL ); strftime( timeStr, 9, "%H:%M:%S", localtime(&current) );, even if it looks like a handful, because it makes your code not unnecessarily depending on a (deprecated) Windows-only function. –  DevSolar Sep 19 '11 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

That's simple, you have a char array timeStr of length 9 and trying to assign it to a char intime. There's type incompatibility. Think of it as char[] is never equal to char.

You could solve this as follows (but I don't know what you want to achieve):

struct tme
{
  char* intime;
}e;

PS: MSDN states that (_strtime):

// Note: _strtime is deprecated; consider using _strtime_s instead

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  e.intime=timeStr;

timeStr is of type char [9]. It decays to a pointer pointing to first element during assignments or in a function call used as a parameter.

e.intime is of type char. char and char* aren't type compatible and the compiler is complaining you that. Instead you can do -

struct tme
{
  char intime[10]; // +1 for the termination character to play safe
}e;

Now, strcpy can be used to copy the time to the member variable.

strcpy(e.intime, timeStr);

If it is C++, use std::string instead of raw arrays.

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A buffer size of 9 suffices: six digits, two colons, and a null character. –  David Hammen Sep 19 '11 at 5:58
    
If that extra termination character is required, then it is not safe (because timeStr won't have a terminating null, so strcpy might overwrite more than 10 chars). But in fact strTime is guaranteed to be null-terminated, so 9 characters are enough. –  TonyK Sep 19 '11 at 6:05
    
@TonyK - strcpy never overwrites just because it has some more left over space at destination. It just copies the source to destination until the source is hit by \0. –  Mahesh Sep 19 '11 at 6:07
    
@Mahesh: I know what strcpy does! Your extra byte is superfluous because (i) if timeStr is zero-terminated, then it's not needed; and (ii) if timeStr is not zero-terminated, then it's not enough. –  TonyK Sep 19 '11 at 7:45

Some stages of refinement:

Stage 1: Fix your code.

struct tme {
  char * intime; // You had a type mismatch
} e;

int main () { // Don't use void main()
  char timeStr [9];
 _strtime( timeStr );
  e.intime=timeStr;
  printf( "The current time is %s \n", timeStr);
}

There's a problem here: Your struct tme is relying on the external world to do everything for it, and to do so correctly. What if we want to reuse timeStr in main? What if you use this structure in a function other than main and set e.intime to a variable that goes out of scope?

Refinement: struct tme should own the time buffer.

struct tme {
  char intime[9]; // Put the buffer here, not in main.
} e;

int main () {
  _strtime( e.intime );
  printf( "The current time is %s \n", e.intime);
}

We still have a problem here. That buffer can be modified by anyone, and the structure is just a passive receptacle.

Refinement: Hide the data and make the object active.

struct tme {
  const char * set_time () { _strtime (intime); return intime; }
  const char * get_time () const { return intime; }
private:
  char intime[9];
};

int main () {
  printf( "The current time is %s \n", e.set_time());
}
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