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can anyone explain the strage output of the program I know that the value has nothing to do with the value stored in the array but with the pointer thing but how is the second value coming to be 5:

int main()
{
    int **h;
    int a[2][2]={1,2,3,4};
    h=(int **)a;
    int i,j;
    printf("%d",*h);
    (*h)++;
    printf("\n%d",*h);

    getch();
    return 0;
}
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1  
Instead of providing a link please just post a code sample here. –  Ed S. Sep 19 '11 at 6:21
1  
@Ed S. In general I hate pastebins, but let's be honest here... ideone is awesome. It's much better than just posting code in the question - you can see the compiler warnings and the output. It's just a shame it's not integrated into SO like imgur is. –  Mark Byers Sep 19 '11 at 6:23
1  
How does int a[2][2]={1,2,3,4}; compile? –  Mysticial Sep 19 '11 at 6:25
2  
TBH, it shouldn't be tagged c++... –  Griwes Sep 19 '11 at 6:25
2  
@AnkitSablok: But it's still C code, so C++ tag should not be there. –  Griwes Sep 19 '11 at 6:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since the expression *h is a pointer type, pointer arithmetic comes into play. Remember that pointer arithmetic takes the size of the base type into account; for any pointer of type T *p, the expression p++ will advance the pointer p by sizeof T bytes.

Since *h is a pointer initialized to the value 1, the expression (*h)++ is read as "add sizeof (int *) bytes to 1", which in your case is obviously 4. Hence the output of 5.

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What's happening is that *h is of type int* which is a pointer.

When you increment it will actually increment by 4 rather than 1. Therefore the number you print out in the end is 1 + 4 = 5.

Here's your code with more prints:

  int **h; 
  int a[2][2]={1,2,3,4}; 
  h=(int **)a; 

  cout << h[0] << endl;
  cout << h[1] << endl;
  cout << h[2] << endl;
  cout << h[3] << endl;

  int i,j; 
  printf("%d",*h); 
  (*h)++; 
  printf("\n%d",*h); 

  cout << endl;
  cout << h[0] << endl;
  cout << h[1] << endl;
  cout << h[2] << endl;
  cout << h[3] << endl;

The output is:

00000001
00000002
00000003
00000004
1
5
00000005
00000002
00000003
00000004

So you can see the first value, being incremented by 4. Because 4 is the size of the pointer when compiled for 32-bit.

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what does this fragment do int a[2][2]={1,2,3,4}; –  AnkitSablok Sep 19 '11 at 6:40
    
also h[0] and so on like h[4] will all be (int *)'s so y is the code printing 1,2,3,4 when you try to print them –  AnkitSablok Sep 19 '11 at 6:41
    
In this case, it's initializing the first 16 bytes of a, to {1, 2, 3, 4}. I honestly didn't know you could do this, so it might be undefined behavior. Someone want to add to this? –  Mysticial Sep 19 '11 at 6:43
1  
What you're doing here isn't exactly safe. But when you did h=(int **)a;, you set the pointer h to point the start of your array {1,2,3,4}. But *h is an array of pointers, so your values, {1,2,3,4} are being interpreted as pointers. So when you increment one of them, they will go up by 4. –  Mysticial Sep 19 '11 at 6:46

By the statement h=(int **)a; you have only allocated the memory address(the first) of the array a to h. You have also defined h as a pointer to a pointer which can also point to a two-dimensional array as you have done. Also, to be seen, you have not made h a two-dimensional array(using malloc recursively). By printf("%d",*h);, you are trying to access the value at the address stored in h.

Arrays store values in memory in two ways, either column-wise or row-wise. In either ways the memory locations are sequential, in your case also. So, h stores the memory address of the first element of the array a. Therefore, when you use *h it retrieves the value at the address stored in h, i.e., the first value in array a. And when you increment *h by (*h)++, it increments because *h is still a pointer, and as you know incrementing a pointer doesn't mean incrementing by 1, it actually increments by 4.

Hence, you are getting the above-mentioned output of yours.

Further discussions are welcomed from you Ankit.

-Sandip

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