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I wonder a generic way for setting all bits of enum flag to 1. I just would like to have an enum which returns for all comparisons, regardless of other enums.

And this code works;

[Flags]
public enum SomeRightEnum : uint
{
    CanDoNothing = 0,
    CanDoSomething = 1 << 0,
    CanDoSomethingElse = 1 << 1,
    CanDoYetAnotherThing = 1 << 2,
    ...
    DoEverything = 0xFFFFFFFF 
}

But at the code above since it is uint we set the number of "F"s, it wouldn't work if it was int.

So I'll appreciate a generic way of setting all bits of enum flag to 1, regardless of the datatype (int, int64, uint etc)

Regards,

-AFgone

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1  
Hmmm. The intent of enumerations is to describe mutually exclusive options. You seem to be using them as shorthand for a bunch of bitmasks. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 19 '11 at 7:39
1  
@AFgone You are using the [Flags] attribute on the enum right? –  Bernie White Sep 19 '11 at 7:49
1  
@Oli The [Flags] attribute on the enum is designed for this purpose. –  Bernie White Sep 19 '11 at 7:51
1  
@Bernie White: The Flags attribute is purely cosmetic, you CAN use 'flags' without it. –  leppie Sep 19 '11 at 7:55
    
@Bernie sure, I edited, just forgat to copy it –  AFgone Sep 19 '11 at 8:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Easiest is probably:

enum Foo
{
  blah = 1,
  ....
  all = ~0
}

For unsigned based enum:

enum Foo : uint
{
  blah = 1,
  ....
  all = unchecked((uint)~0)
}
share|improve this answer
    
when I try this it says "Constant value '-1' cannot be converted to a 'uint' " –  AFgone Sep 19 '11 at 8:10
1  
Just cast it then, eg unchecked((uint)~0) –  leppie Sep 19 '11 at 8:11
    
many thanks this is the what I was looking for –  AFgone Sep 19 '11 at 8:14
internal static class Program
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Foo.Everything.HasFlag(Foo.None)); // False
        Console.WriteLine(Foo.Everything.HasFlag(Foo.Baz)); // True
        Console.WriteLine(Foo.Everything.HasFlag(Foo.Hello)); // True
    }
}

[Flags]
public enum Foo : uint
{
    None = 1 << 0,
    Bar = 1 << 1,
    Baz = 1 << 2,
    Qux = 1 << 3,
    Hello = 1 << 4,
    World = 1 << 5,
    Everything = Bar | Baz | Qux | Hello | World
}

Was this what you wanted?

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but this is not regardless of other enums, when I edit or remove enums I have to change also "Everything" –  AFgone Sep 19 '11 at 8:11
[Flags]
public enum MyEnum
{
    None   = 0,
    First  = 1 << 0,
    Second = 1 << 1,
    Third  = 1 << 2,
    Fourth = 1 << 3,
    All = ~(-1 << 4)
}
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I like this option even better than my usual -1 option. I was using an enum to keep track of which tasks were requested and removing the flag when the task was completed. My plan was then to use the result as the exit code. So this helps with the maintenance of the tasks enum. –  Schmalls Jul 20 at 5:27

In case someone is wondering: I needed to do the same building a Bindable enumconverter for WPF.
Since I don't know what the values meen in Reflection, I needed to manually been able to switch values (binding them to a checkbox p.e.)
There is a problem setting the value of a Flagged enum to -1 to set all the bits.
If you set it to -1 and you unflag all values it will not result in 0 because all unused bits are not unflagged.
This is wat worked best for my situation.

    SomeRightEnum someRightEnum = SomeRightEnum.CanDoNothing;
    int newValue = 0;
    var enumValues = Enum.GetValues( someRightEnum.GetType( ) ).Cast<int>( );
    foreach ( var value in enumValues )
    {
      newValue |= value;
    }
    Console.WriteLine(newValue);
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