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I have a simple application that reads data in small strings from large text files and saves them to a database. To actually save each such String, the application calls the following method several (may thousands, or more) times:

setValue(String value)
{
    if (!ignore(value))
    {
         // Save the value in the database
    }
}

Currently, I implement the ignore() method by just successively comparing a set of Strings, e.g.

public boolean ignore(String value)
{
    if (value.equalsIgnoreCase("Value 1") || (value.equalsIgnoreCase("Value 2"))
    {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

However, because I need to check against many such "ignorable" values, which will be defined in another part of the code, I need to use a data structure for this check, instead of multiple consecutive if statements.

So, my question is, what would be the fastest data structure from standard Java to to implement this? A HashMap? A Set? Something else?

Initialization time is not an issue, since it will happen statically and once per application invocation.

EDIT: The solutions suggested thus far (including HashSet) appear slower than just using a String[] with all the ignored words and just running "equalsIgnoreCase" against each of these.

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5 Answers 5

Use a HashSet, storing the values in lowercase, and its contains() method, which has better lookup performance than TreeSet (constant-time versus log-time for contains).

Set<String> ignored = new HashSet<String>();
ignored.add("value 1"); // store in lowercase
ignored.add("value 2"); // store in lowercase

public boolean ignore(String value) {
    return ignored.contains(value.toLowerCase());    
}

Storing the values in lowercase and searching for the lowercased input avoids the hassle of dealing with case during comparison, so you get the full speed of the HashSet implementation and zero collection-related code to write (eg Collator, Comparator etc).

EDITED
Thanks to Jon Skeet for pointing out that certain Turkish characters behave oddly when calling toLowerCase(), but if you're not intending on supporting Turkish input (or perhaps other languages with non-standard case issues) then this approach will work well for you.

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On the other hand, that assumes that you're happy with lower-casing as a means of performing a case-insensitive comparison, which isn't always correct. –  Jon Skeet Sep 19 '11 at 10:53
    
@Jon Skeet Isn't it? Are you saying that there is a case where a.toLowerCase().equals(b.toLowerCase()) ^ a.equalsIgnoreCase(b)? If so, please give one. To me, the javadoc seems to say they are the same. I'll be happy to be wrong here, because I'll learn something! –  Bohemian Sep 19 '11 at 11:02
    
There are oddities in Turkish. If a="ma\u0131l" and b="MA\u0130L" that will give problems. See moserware.com/2008/02/does-your-code-pass-turkey-test.html for some more interesting information (.NET-based, but still relevant). –  Jon Skeet Sep 19 '11 at 11:09
    
Does it make any difference if values are stored all in lower case, or all in upper case? I would guess it is the same. –  PNS Sep 19 '11 at 11:38
1  
@Bohemian: An example of what Jon is saying is that "MAIL".toLowerCase() will return "maıl" in a Turkish locale, so it wouldn't match with "mail" as you or I would expect. Conversely, "mail".toUpperCase() would return "MAİL". –  Gabe Sep 20 '11 at 6:22

In most cases I'd normally start with a HashSet<String> - but as you want case-insensitivity, that makes it slightly harder.

You can try using a TreeSet<Object> using an appropriate Collator for case-insensitivity. For example:

Collator collator = Collator.getInstance(Locale.US);
collator.setStrength(Collator.SECONDARY);

TreeSet<Object> set = new TreeSet<Object>(collator);

Note that you can't create a TreeSet<String> as Collator only implements Comparator<Object>.

EDIT: While the above version works with just strings, it may be faster to create a TreeSet<CollationKey>:

Collator collator = Collator.getInstance(Locale.US);
collator.setStrength(Collator.SECONDARY);

TreeSet<CollationKey> set = new TreeSet<CollationKey>();
for (String value : valuesToIgnore) {
    set.add(collator.getCollationKey(value));
}

Then:

public boolean ignore(String value)
{
    return set.contains(collator.getCollationKey(value));
}

It would be nice to have a way of storing the collation keys for all ignored values but then avoid creating new collation keys when testing, but I don't know of a way of doing that.

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Does it mean the reference set should use 'CollationKeys' ? –  panzerschreck Sep 19 '11 at 10:52
    
@panzerschrek: Editing - I hadn't thought of that. –  Jon Skeet Sep 19 '11 at 10:54

Add the words to ignore to a list and just check if the word is in that list.

That makes it dynamically.

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This is utterly slow O(n). It grows with time, he says the comparisons are in thousands. –  panzerschreck Sep 19 '11 at 11:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems that String[] is slightly better (performance-wise) than the other methods proposed, so I will use that.

It is simply something like this:

public boolean ignore(String value)
{
    for (String ignore:IGNORED_VALUES)
    {
        if (ignore.equalsIgnoreCase(value))
    {
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

The IGNORED_VALUES object is just a String[] with all ignored values in there.

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If using Java 7 this is a fast way to do it:

public boolean ignore(String value) {
  switch(value.toLowerCase()) { // see comment Jon Skeet
    case "lowercased_ignore_value1":
    case "lowercased_ignore_value2":
      // etc
      return true;
    default:
      return false;
  }
}
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