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I needed code to generate a word list from a pre-specified character set and starting at a specific position so i can stop then continue later. My code isn't that good, so i would really appreciate any help fixing it or hints on making it faster/more efficient or any comments.

Here is the current output:

Data = aaa
Data = aab
Data = aac
Data = aba
Data = abb
Data = abc
Data = aca
Data = acb
Data = acc
Data = a
Data = a
Data = a
Data = baa
Data = bab
Data = bac
Data = bba
Data = bbb
Data = bbc
Data = bca
Data = bcb
Data = bcc
Data = b
Data = b
Data = b
Data = caa
Data = cab
Data = cac
Data = cba
Data = cbb
Data = cbc
Data = cca
Data = ccb
Data = ccc
Data = c
Data = c
Data = c

the output should be (i guess)

Data = aaa
Data = aab
Data = aac
Data = aba
Data = abb
Data = abc
Data = aca
Data = acb
Data = acc
Data = baa
Data = bab
Data = bac
Data = bba
Data = bbb
Data = bbc
Data = bca
Data = bcb
Data = bcc
Data = caa
Data = cab
Data = cac
Data = cba
Data = cbb
Data = cbc
Data = cca
Data = ccb
Data = ccc

which are all the possible combinations of the 3 letters character set of 3 letters combination

and here is my c code

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

char *charset = "abc";
int len = 3;
char *str;

int CharPos(char c)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        if (charset[i] == c) break;
    }
    if (i == strlen(charset)) i = 0;
    return i;
}

void generate(int pos)
{
    while(str[0] != 0)
    {
        bool zero = false;
        int y = 0;
        while (str[len - 1] != 0)
        {
            printf("Data = %s\n", str);
            str[len - 1] = charset[++y];
            if (zero)
            {
                zero = false;
                break;
            }
            Sleep(100);
        }

        int x = len;
        while (x)
        {

            x--; // x = 1
            if (str[x] != 0)
            {
                int charpos = CharPos(str[x]); // str[x] = a, charpos = 0
                str[x] = charset[++charpos]; //aba
                if (str[x] == 0) zero = true;
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                str[x] = charset[0];
            }
        }
        str[len - 1] = charset[0];
    }
    return;
}

int main()
{
    str = malloc(len);
    strcpy(str, "aaa");
    generate(len - 1);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
codereview.stackexchange.com perhaps? –  quasiverse Sep 19 '11 at 10:42
    
it doesn't work, so i cant actually post there –  killercode Sep 19 '11 at 10:45
    
You can't strcpy 3 characters and the null terminator to an object capable of holding 3 bytes! strcpy(str, "aaa"); is invalid unless you allocate more space with eg str = malloc(len + 1); –  pmg Sep 19 '11 at 10:56

2 Answers 2

You can use this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void){
        char  str[] = "aaa";
        int    len = strlen(str);
        int idx = 0;

        while(idx < len){
                while(str[idx] <= 'c') {
                        printf("%s\n",str);
                        str[idx]++;
                }
                str[idx] = 'a';
                while(++idx<len) {
                        str[idx]++;
                        if(str[idx] <= 'c') {
                                idx = 0;
                        break;
                }
                str[idx] = 'a';
                }
          }
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it works just find, but the character set is one of the parts that's making me insane –  killercode Sep 19 '11 at 12:54

So what you want is all possible combinations of a given string.

So I took a look at it, wrote down the sequence you wanted in terms of indexes in the given string:

"abc"

aaa = 000
aab = 001
aac = 002
aba = 010
abb = 011
abc = 012
aca = 020
acb = 021
acc = 022
baa = 100
... and so forth.

This is basically counting from 0 up to some number in some base. The number of possible combinations here is 3^3, so you are basically counting up to 27 in base 3. More generally: Let x be the length of the given string. We are then counting from 0 up to x^x in base x.

You can then use the number representation in base x to find the n-th combination.

I wrote a quick solution in java:

static void combinations(String str) {
    int base = str.length();
    int combinations = (int) Math.pow(base, base);

    for (int i = 0; i < combinations; i++) {
        int c = i;
        char[] arr = new char[base];
        for (int j = arr.length-1; j >= 0; j--) {
            arr[j] = str.charAt(c % base);
            c /= base;
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arr));
    }
}

combinations("abc") gives me:

aaa
aab
aac
aba
abb
abc
aca
acb
acc
baa
...

Here's a possible solution in C(first time using C):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

int
main() {
    char *str = "abc";
    int len = strlen(str);
    int combinations = len;
    int j = 1;
    while (j++ < len) {
            combinations = combinations*len;
    }

    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < combinations;i++) {
            char arr[len];
            int c = i;
            int j;
            for (j = len-1; j >= 0;j--) {
                    arr[j] = str[c % len];
                    c /= len;
            }
            printf("%s\n", arr);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess this isnt Java place to answer Please be specific! –  niko Sep 19 '11 at 11:57
    
Change it as soon as possible You may get downvotes :) –  niko Sep 19 '11 at 11:58
2  
Well. This is posted in algorithms as well. I explained the algorithm, and I added the java-solution as an example. –  wtf Sep 19 '11 at 12:02
    
cool ! Good one –  niko Sep 19 '11 at 12:19
    
yea, but what if the characters required are the whole alphabet? or even twice "A...Za...z" and maybe Symbols too im sure u wont be able to hold that number on an int or __int64 –  killercode Sep 19 '11 at 12:52

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