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I have an MVC controller base class on which I applied the Authorize attribute since I want almost all of the controllers (and their actions along) to be authorized.

However I need to have a controller and an action of another controller unauthorized. I wanted to be able to decorate them with the [Authorize(false)] or something but this is not available.

Any ideas?

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4 Answers

up vote 59 down vote accepted

You could create a custom authorisation attribute inheriting from the standard AuthorizeAttribute with an optional bool parameter to specify whether authorisation is required or not.

public class OptionalAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
	private readonly bool _authorize;

	public OptionalAuthorizeAttribute()
	{
		_authorize = true;
	}

	public OptionalAuthorizeAttribute(bool authorize)
	{
		_authorize = authorize;
	}

	protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
	{
		if(!_authorize)
			return true;

                    return base.AuthorizeCore(httpContext);
	}
}

Then you can decorate your base controller with that attribute:

[OptionalAuthorize]
public class ControllerBase : Controller
{
}

and for any controllers you don't want authorisation simply use the override with a 'false' - e.g.

[OptionalAuthorize(false)]
public class TestController : ControllerBase
{
	public ActionResult Index()
	{
		return View();
	}
}
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I have thought of this but I was hoping for a simpler solution. However if "they" didn't provide one then your solution is the best one. –  Andrei Rînea Apr 14 '09 at 12:07
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It seems ASP.NET MVC 4 'fixed' this by adding an AllowAnonymous attribute.

David Hayden wrote about this.

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My personal take on this would be to split the controller. Just create another controller For the actions you don't need authentication.

Or you could have :

  • BaseController
    doesn't require authentication - here you have all your "base stuff" :).

  • BaseAuthController : BaseController
    all actions here require authentication.

That way you can have authentication when you want , just by deriving from a specific class.

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If you just want one action to be unauthorized on an otherwise authorized controller you can do something like this:

public class RequiresAuthorizationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private readonly bool _authorize;

    public RequiresAuthorizationAttribute()
    {
    	_authorize = true;
    }

    public RequiresAuthorizationAttribute(bool authorize)
    {
    	_authorize = authorize;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
    	var overridingAttributes = filterContext.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (RequiresAuthorizationAttribute), false);

    	if (overridingAttributes.Length > 0 && overridingAttributes[0] as RequiresAuthorizationAttribute != null && !((RequiresAuthorizationAttribute)overridingAttributes[0])._authorize)
    		return;

    	if (_authorize)
    	{
    		//redirect if not authenticated
    		if (!filterContext.HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
    		{
    			//use the current url for the redirect
    			var redirectOnSuccess = filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Url.AbsolutePath;

    			//send them off to the login page
    			//var redirectUrl = string.Format("?RedirectUrl={0}", redirectOnSuccess);
    			var loginUrl = LinkBuilder.BuildUrlFromExpression<HomeController>(filterContext.RequestContext, RouteTable.Routes,
    			                                                                  x => x.Login(redirectOnSuccess));
    			filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Redirect(loginUrl, true);
    		}
    	}
    }
}
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