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How do I write a bash script that goes through each directory inside a parent_directory and executes a command in each directory.

The directory structure is as follows:

parent_directory (name could be anything - doesnt follow a pattern)

  • 001 (directory names follow this pattern)

    • 0001.txt (filenames follow this pattern)
    • 0002.txt
    • 0003.txt
    • 0004.txt
    • 0005.txt
    • 0006.txt
  • 002

    • 0001.txt
    • 0002.txt
    • 0003.txt
    • 0004.txt
  • 003

    • 0001.txt
    • 0002.txt
    • 0003.txt
    • 0004.txt
    • 0005.txt
    • 0006.txt
    • 0007.txt
    • 0008.txt

the number of directories is unknown.

Any help is appreciated.

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8 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can do the following, when your current directory is parent_directory:

for d in [0-9][0-9][0-9]
do
    ( cd $d && your-command-here )
done

The ( and ) create a subshell, so the current directory isn't changed in the main script.

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find . -type d -exec sh -c '(cd {} && COMMAND)' ';'

where COMMAND is the command you want to run. This works recursively, i.e. traverses all subdirectories as well. {} denotes each directory found by find, in order, and the sh -c spawns a shell that cd's to the directory and runs COMMAND.

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Why not just use -execdir? –  Sorpigal Sep 19 '11 at 15:03
1  
@Sorpigal: -execdir requires GNU find, so I guess it won't run on BSD systems (including Mac OS X). –  larsmans Sep 19 '11 at 21:47
    
How would I execute a complex command also containing quotes, such as ls -A | sed -n 's/^\.\(.*\)/mv ".\1" "\1"/p' | bash –  Bryson Nov 30 '11 at 1:40
    
@Bryson: that sounds like another question entirely :) –  larsmans Dec 1 '11 at 18:37
1  
I used it in this way find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -exec sh -c '(cd {} && git pull)' ';' –  Rashi Nov 15 '13 at 5:12
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If the toplevel folder is known you can just write something like this:

for dir in `ls $YOUR_TOP_LEVEL_FOLDER`;
do
    for subdir in `ls $YOUR_TOP_LEVEL_FOLDER/$dir`;
    do
      $(PLAY AS MUCH AS YOU WANT);
    done
done

On the $(PLAY AS MUCH AS YOU WANT); you can put as much code as you want.

Note that I didn't "cd" on any directory.

Cheers,

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2  
There are a couple of instances of "Useless Use of ls" here - you could just do for dir in $YOUR_TOP_LEVEL_FOLDER/* instead. –  Mark Longair Sep 19 '11 at 11:40
    
Well, maybe it's useless in a general sense but it allows to do filtering directly in the ls (i.e all directories ended with .tmp). That's why I used the ls $dir expression –  gforcada Sep 19 '11 at 13:39
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you can use

find .

to search all files/dirs in the current directory recurive

Than you can pipe the output the xargs command like so

find . | xargs 'command here'
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This answer posted by Todd helped me.

find . -maxdepth 1 -type d \( ! -name . \) -exec bash -c "cd '{}' && pwd" \;

The \( ! -name . \) avoids executing the command in current directory.

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I don't get the point with the formating of the file, since you only want to iterate through folders... Are you looking for something like this?

cd parent
find . -type d | while read d; do
   ls $d/
done
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for p in [0-9][0-9][0-9];do
    (
        for f in [0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]*.txt;do
            ls $f; # Your operands
        done
    )
done
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You'd need to change back up the directory again, or do the cd in a subshell. –  Mark Longair Sep 19 '11 at 11:37
    
Thanks for corrections, Mark. Subshell goes perfectly here. –  Fedir Sep 19 '11 at 11:50
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for dir in PARENT/*
do
  test -d "$dir" || continue
  # Do something with $dir...
done
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+1 for mentioning the 'test -d'. Helped me. –  akauppi Mar 31 '13 at 17:06
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