Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing below function to return Suffix passing name as parameter. I made possible cases of suffix exsist in name as common table expression and trying to compare with that. Could any one explain me the proper way of doing it.

  Alter function S (@Name varchar(100))
returns varchar(25)
as 
begin
declare @Suffix varchar(25)
WITH SearchTerms(Term)
     AS (SELECT ' I '
         UNION ALL
         SELECT ' II '
         UNION ALL
         SELECT ' III '
         UNION All
         SELECT ' MD '
          UNION All
         SELECT ' M.D '
          UNION All
         SELECT ' M.D. '
          UNION All
         SELECT ' D.O '
           UNION All
         SELECT ' D.O. '
           UNION All
         SELECT ' DO '
         )  ;

 set @Suffix = (select Term from SearchTerms where Charindex(Term,@Name) > 0)
 return @Suffix

 end

Error message.

Msg 319, Level 15, State 1, Procedure S, Line 6
Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'with'. If this statement is a common table expression, 
an xmlnamespaces clause or a change tracking context clause, the previous statement must 
be terminated with a semicolon.
share|improve this question
1  
The error is pretty self-explanatory, isn't it? See this blog post for reasons you should get in the habit of using statement terminators: sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/09/03/… And also this one about using schema prefix (especially valid for user-defined functions): sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/10/11/… –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '11 at 12:00
    
I am still getting the below error after placing the ; for the diclaration before CTE. Msg 102, Level 15, State 1, Procedure S, Line 24 Incorrect syntax near ';'. –  Shine Sep 19 '11 at 12:08
    
What does this yield? SELECT compatibility_level FROM sys.databases WHERE database_id = DB_ID(); –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '11 at 12:09
    
i got 100 in my system. –  Shine Sep 19 '11 at 12:15
    
That error is because your missing a ; to fix: ;WITH SearchTerms(Term) AS ... - what do you mean more that 1 suffix? can you provide a sample input & desired output –  Alex K. Sep 19 '11 at 12:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see it now, you have a semi-colon at the end of your CTE declaration. You can't do that since that terminates the statement. Try this:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.S(@Name varchar(100))
RETURNS VARCHAR(25)
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Suffix VARCHAR(25);

    WITH SearchTerms(Term) AS 
    (
      SELECT ' I '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' II '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' III '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' MD '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' M.D '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' M.D. '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' D.O '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' D.O. '
      UNION ALL SELECT ' DO '
    )
    SELECT @Suffix = Term 
        FROM SearchTerms 
        WHERE CHARINDEX(Term, ' ' + @Name + ' ') > 0;

    RETURN (LTRIM(RTRIM(@Suffix)));
END
GO

EDIT based on new information, here is a table-valued function that returns all results:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.T
(
    @Name VARCHAR(100)
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
    RETURN
    (
        SELECT 
            Term = CONVERT(VARCHAR(25), LTRIM(RTRIM(Term)))
        FROM
        (
            SELECT Term = ' I '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' II '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' III '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' MD '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' M.D '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' M.D. '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' D.O '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' D.O. '
            UNION ALL SELECT ' DO '
        ) AS Terms
        WHERE CHARINDEX(Term, ' ' + @Name + ' ') > 0
    );
GO

SELECT Term FROM dbo.T('Terry Allen MD III');
share|improve this answer
    
@Martin Well, it won't fail per se, it will just pick one arbitrary matching Term. If he wants to return multiple matches then it needs to be either a table-valued function or some kind of concat. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '11 at 12:31
1  
@Martin Yes I got rid of the subquery (not for that reason but simply because it was redundant). –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 19 '11 at 12:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.