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This Python code gives a two dimensional table in version 2. However in Python 3 it doesn't work.

i = 1
while (i <= 10):
    print (2*i, ' ',)
    i += 1
    print ()

The output is:

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

Although I have made modifications in print statements as required in Python 3, it still does not work. How can I make this code work in Python 3?

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closed as not a real question by Lennart Regebro, Mark, Robert Harvey Sep 19 '11 at 16:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what's the code and output for your python2 program? –  steabert Sep 19 '11 at 12:04
    
print() calls are not your issue here: ideone.com/QOjCG How else did you change your code? –  Amber Sep 19 '11 at 12:07
    
what exactly does not work? –  KillianDS Sep 19 '11 at 12:08
5  
-1 "Doesn't work" is hopeless for us. In what way does it not work. Be precise. –  David Heffernan Sep 19 '11 at 12:10
1  
No extant version of Python produces that output. Please try harder. –  David Heffernan Sep 19 '11 at 12:15

4 Answers 4

print(2*i, ' ',) isn't the same as Python 2.x print 2*i, ' ', because the comma at the end in the function call just acts as a parameter terminator and isn't actually available to the function.

Use print(2*i, ' ', end = ' ') in Python 3 to accomplish the same thing (although you can probably leave out the ' ' parameter altogether, and put 2 spaces in the end parameter.

Since you've tagged this "pythonic", I should probably also point out that the:

i = 1
while i <= 10:
    i += 1

pattern isn't very pythonic; the idiom is:

for i in range(1,11):
    print(whatever)
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this end parameter works. thanks –  Muavia Sep 19 '11 at 12:30

Move the second print call out of the loop. Inside the loop, a newline is added between every number.

i = 1
while (i <= 10):
    print (2*i, ' ',end='')
    i += 1
print()

Or, you could replace the while loop (and the print() call) with a generator expression:

print(*(2*i for i in range(1,11)),sep='  ')
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You don't need the end='' in the generator version –  KillianDS Sep 19 '11 at 12:20
    
@KillianDS: True, thanks! –  unutbu Sep 19 '11 at 12:25

That code doesn't produce what you say it does on any version of Python. On Python 2, print(2*i, ' ',) prints a tuple. On Python 3, print is a function and so there is no tuple.

On Python 2 the output is:

(2, ' ')
()
(4, ' ')
()
(6, ' ')
()
(8, ' ')
()
(10, ' ')
()
(12, ' ')
()
(14, ' ')
()
(16, ' ')
()
(18, ' ')
()
(20, ' ')
()

On Python 3 the output is:

2  

4  

6  

8  

10  

12  

14  

16  

18  

20  

It's impossible to help much more than that until you post the code you are really using.

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print(*(str(2*x) for x in range(1,11)))

Or less short:

for x in range(1, 11):
    print(2*x, end=' ')
print()

Now you figure out what the difference is. :-)

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yeah that worked. that's what i'd been looking for –  Muavia Sep 20 '11 at 3:53

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