Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an MySQL table named i_visited structured like: userid,tid,dateline

And I run this condition in view_thread.php page:

if (db('count','SELECT userid FROM i_visited 
                WHERE tid = '.intval($_GET['id']).' 
                  AND userid = '.$user['id']))

  mysql_query('UPDATE i_visited 
               SET dateline = unix_timestamp(now()) 
               WHERE userid = '.$user['id'].' 
                 AND tid = '.intval($_GET['id']));
else 
  mysql_query('INSERT INTO i_visited (userid,tid,dateline) VALUES 
              ('.$user['id'].','.intval($_GET['id']).',unix_timestamp(now()))');

The problem is that it executes in 80/100 ms (on Windows) 40/60 (on Linux)

1 row affected. (query executed in 0.0707 sec)

The mysql_num_rows() aka db('count',sql) uses 2 / 3 ms, so the problem is at the update and the insert.

P.S. i_visited is an utf8_unicode_ci (InnoDB), has anyone seen this problem?
Other queries run normal (2 / 3 milliseconds)

CREATE TABLE i_visited ( 
  userid int(10) NOT NULL, 
  tid int(10) unsigned NOT NULL, 
  dateline int(10) NOT NULL, 
  KEY userid (userid,tid), 
  KEY userid_2 (userid), 
  KEY tid (tid) ) 
ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci
share|improve this question
1  
Have you already tried an REPLACE INTO –  rabudde Sep 19 '11 at 12:07
1  
Are you sure that like, your indexes are set and ok? Like? –  Iznogood Sep 19 '11 at 12:07
    
Include the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE i_visited, and also tell use how many rows are in that table. –  Paul Dixon Sep 19 '11 at 12:08
    
@Innogood I like totally like what you did there –  Paul Dixon Sep 19 '11 at 12:09
    
CREATE TABLE i_visited ( userid int(10) NOT NULL, tid int(10) unsigned NOT NULL, dateline int(10) NOT NULL, KEY userid (userid,tid), KEY userid_2 (userid), KEY tid (tid) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci –  edduvs Sep 19 '11 at 12:19

2 Answers 2

You do not need to do a select to check existence and then choose either Update or Insert.

You can use MySQL's ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE Feature like this.

$query = 'INSERT INTO 
            i_visited (userid,tid,dateline) 
            VALUES (' . 
                $user['id'] . ',' . 
                intval($_GET['id']) . ',
                unix_timestamp(now())) 
            ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE 
                dateline = unix_timestamp(now())';
mysql_query($query);

This query will insert a new row if there is now KEY conflict, and in case a duplicate key is being inserted, it will instead execute the update part.

And as you have a KEY userid (userid,tid) in your CREATE Statement the above query is equivalent to your if...else block.

Try this and see if there are any gains

You can also use REPLACE INTO, as there are only the specified 3 columns, like this

$query = 'REPLACE INTO 
            i_visited (userid,tid,dateline) 
            VALUES (' . 
                $user['id'] . ',' . 
                intval($_GET['id']) . ',
                unix_timestamp(now()))';
mysql_query($query);

But I would suggest looking at ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE as it is more flexible, as it can be used on a table with any number of columns, whereas REPLACE INTO would only work in some limited cases as other column values would also need to be filled in the REPLACE INTO statement unnecessarily

share|improve this answer
    
Same stupid thing, ~100 ms to process that query. Even using on duplicate key and that new table definition. –  edduvs Sep 19 '11 at 13:05
    
@edduvs try simply executing mysql_query('UPDATE i_visited SET dateline = unix_timestamp(now()) WHERE userid = '.$user['id'].' AND tid = '.intval($_GET['id'])); for a known pre existing id and tid, see how long it takes. Might help in narrowing the cause. Even if you do it via AJAX, a large number of simultaneous users would slow down the server if an SQL query takes so long to execute. Something is definately wrong here. I myself try to optimize any query over 20ms in my application. –  danishgoel Sep 19 '11 at 13:59

I think (part) of the problem is that your table does not have an explicit primary key.
You've only declared secondary keys.

Change the definition to:

CREATE TABLE i_visited ( 
  userid int(10) NOT NULL, 
  tid int(10) unsigned NOT NULL, 
  dateline int(10) NOT NULL, 
  PRIMARY KEY userid (userid,tid), <<----------
  KEY userid_2 (userid), 
  KEY tid (tid) ) 
ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

InnoDB does not work well without an explicit primary key defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you help me declaring the table's structure , i know i have to modify the keys for this to work ok, i was just reading about on duplicate key, thanks for the future support. –  edduvs Sep 19 '11 at 12:50
    
@edduvs, use an alter table statement, see here: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/alter-table.html Of course its much easier in a editor like phpAdmin or MySQL workbench. –  Johan Sep 19 '11 at 12:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.