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x=range(1,4)
y=range(1,4)


[(xi,yi) for xi in x for yi in y if xi is yi]
 #output
 # [(1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3)]

[(xi,yi) for xi in x if xi is yi for yi in y ]
 #output, I am confused about this one
 #[(3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 3)]

Can any one explain why the second loop results like this?

I am quite confused about how multiple in-line loops work in Python.

Also, any tutorial on python in-line loops is favored

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3  
When you're reaching that level of complexity I would probably not use a list comp for that. A regular loop may be more readable. Also, you shouldn't be using is like that. is checks object equality, not value equality. –  Daenyth Sep 19 '11 at 12:37
    
that's a good point. –  xiaohan2012 Sep 19 '11 at 12:39
1  
Don't use is to compare numbers. Use ==. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 19 '11 at 12:40
    
I see the answer. Here is the point, the second loop runs after the first one. yi is actually 3 in the local scope. If run them alone, the second one will raise an error. –  xiaohan2012 Sep 19 '11 at 12:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The second construct isn't valid code on its own:

In [1]: x=range(1,4)

In [2]: y=range(1,4)

In [3]: [(xi,yi) for xi in x if xi is yi for yi in y ]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
NameError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)

/home/aix/<ipython console> in <module>()

NameError: name 'yi' is not defined

The yi in xi is yi isn't referring to the yi that comes after that. It's referring to a pre-existing variable called yi (at least that's what happens during the very first iteration).

The only reason the code worked for you was that you had previously run the first construct and that had left behind yi (set to 3) in the global namespace.

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Here is the point, the second loop runs after the first one, when I operated this.

yi is actually 3 in the local scope.

If running them alone, the second one will raise an error.

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