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I've read a lot of things about the module pattern. Ok It brings structure, private method, etc... But with the code below I can get the same behavior without using it.

function Human()
{
  // private properties
  var _name='';
  var _age=0;


  // private methods
  function created()
  {
    console.log("Human "+_name+" called");
  };

  // public
  this.setName = function(name){
    _name=name;
    created(); 
  };

}


var h1 = new Human();

h1.setName("John");

So, what are the real advantage of a module pattern finally ?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think you are implementing the pattern properly. You'd use an IIFE (instantly invoked function expression) to implement your private methods. Check out this blog post http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth for a much more in depth look. –  bittersweetryan Sep 19 '11 at 13:05
1  
Indeed, this is not the "module pattern", and in my opinion this code does the same thing !? –  Stef Sep 19 '11 at 13:09
1  
The module pattern is about using an anonymous function to control variable scope (rather than dumping things into a global namespace). Your example is a variation of a module pattern (using a function constructor instead of an anonymous function), if you were dealing with more complex relationships or non-constructor functions, then it would be more relevant. check out: adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth –  32bitkid Sep 19 '11 at 13:09
2  
FYI: this.setName is not a public method. Public methods do not have access to private variables. It's considered a privileged method: it can be accessed publicly, but also has access to private variables. For more info, read Crockford's article: javascript.crockford.com/private.html –  Joseph Silber Sep 19 '11 at 13:12
1  
I would call it a public method. It's pointless to give a public method direct access to a property Java-setter-style but that doesn't make it not public, IMO. Public is about where you can access, not what it touches on the inside. I've never seen a need to add more layers of method-types than that to JS OOP and Crockford himself says he never really ended up using that style of class-emulation. –  Erik Reppen Feb 23 '13 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think this example could help you to clarify the usefulness of the Module Pattern.

Module Pattern

The module pattern is widely used because it provides structure and helps organize your code as it grows. Unlike other languages, JavaScript doesn’t have special syntax for packages, but the module pattern provides the tools to create self-contained decoupled pieces of code, which can be treated as black boxes of functionality and added, replaced, or removed according to the (ever-changing) requirements of the software you’re writing.

The module pattern is a combination of several patterns, namely:

  • Namespaces
  • Immediate functions
  • Private and privileged members
  • Declaring dependencies

The first step is setting up a namespace. Let’s use the namespace() function from earlier in this chapter and start an example utility module that provides useful array methods:

MYAPP.namespace('MYAPP.utilities.array');

The next step is defining the module. The pattern uses an immediate function that will provide private scope if privacy is needed. The immediate function returns an object - the actual module with its public interface, which will be available to the consumers of the module:

 MYAPP.utilities.array = (function () {
    return {
    // todo...
    };
 }());

Next, let’s add some methods to the public interface:

MYAPP.utilities.array = (function () {
   return {
      inArray: function (needle, haystack) {
         // ...
      },
      isArray: function (a) {
         // ...
      }
   };
}());

Using the private scope provided by the immediate function, you can declare some private properties and methods as needed. Right at the top of the immediate function will also be the place to declare any dependencies your module might have. Following the variable declarations, you can optionally place any one-off initialization code that helps set up the module. The final result is an object returned by the immediate function that contains the public API of your module:

MYAPP.namespace('MYAPP.utilities.array');
MYAPP.utilities.array = (function () {
   // dependencies
   var uobj = MYAPP.utilities.object,
       ulang = MYAPP.utilities.lang,
       // private properties
       array_string = "[object Array]",
       ops = Object.prototype.toString;
       // private methods
       // ...
       // end var
   // optionally one-time init procedures
   // ...
   // public API
   return {
      inArray: function (needle, haystack) {
         for (var i = 0, max = haystack.length; i < max; i += 1) {
            if (haystack[i] === needle) {
               return true;
            }
         }
      },
      isArray: function (a) {
         return ops.call(a) === array_string;
      }
      // ... more methods and properties
   };
}());

The module pattern is a widely used and highly recommended way to organize your code, especially as it grows.

“JavaScript Patterns, by Stoyan Stefanov (O’Reilly). Copyright 2010 Yahoo!, Inc., 9780596806750

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but now If I change this.inArray: ... and this.isArray: ... and remove the return closure; what is the difference ? (except I'm not using a closure) I still have a public API no ? –  Stef Sep 19 '11 at 14:57
    
Exposing crtical methods like inArray or isArray is sometime dangerous. Indeed somebody could change the method implementation in this way: 'this.isArray = null'. At opposite, if you implement inArray or isArray as private methods and return an object exposing them (in a public api) i.e.: return '{ IsArray: isArray };', your code will continue to work, since its critical functions are hidden to the programmer. :) More info in the 'Revealing pattern' previously know as 'revealing module pattern'. –  user278064 Sep 19 '11 at 15:25
    
Mmhhh, May be a matter of choice finally. I've seen a lot of "Module Pattern vs Anonymous Constructor" on Google... Try benchmark too : jsperf.com/module-pattern-vs-anonymous-constructor –  Stef Sep 19 '11 at 15:26
    
@user278064 But the OP's approach wouldn't expose his private methods. I'm confused as to why people think this is the way to go for basic inheritable object factories. Furthermore, it's not so much "dangerous" unless you're working with hamfisted charlatans who have no place on a development team. It just makes your code easier to understand and refactor by making it clear what data an object is solely responsible and how it's meant to interact with external concerns. With JS you can't afford to think like a Java dev. It's not at all a protectionist language. –  Erik Reppen Feb 23 '13 at 20:23
    
-1. You straight copied an example from a book clearly references code in a previous chapter which you do not supply. –  Tyrsius Jul 3 '13 at 21:41

Not sure why no one's answered this one properly. I can see potential for using auto-invoking functions in some kind of pattern meant to make private vars inheritable, but you're absolutely right.

There is no benefit to using the module pattern in place of a core language function constructor. It's the same exact language mechanic (closures) that allows the persistent internal vars to exist as non-accessible entities only with more code.

In JS a function constructor follows the same rules of scope as a fired function. Scope and closure is set at point of definition. The reason the internal var from a function constructor lives on is because the instance with methods defined inside the same constructor referencing that var lives on.

The only thing that changes is that you've eliminated the use of prototyped methods on the constructor and have to jury-rig your own inheritance mechanism for inherited methods.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the only answer by someone who has apparently read the question and tried to help the asker understand what he was asking about. –  Frug Apr 16 at 15:56

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