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Does anybody know what the main difference between session.commit() and session.flush() in SQLAlchemy is?

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Which aspect of the documentation ("flushing" and "committing" in sqlalchemy.org/docs/orm/session.html#flushing) do you find unclear? –  NPE Sep 19 '11 at 13:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here are some relevant quotes from the documentation.

flush:

When the Session is used with its default configuration, the flush step is nearly always done transparently. Specifically, the flush occurs before any individual Query is issued, as well as within the commit() call before the transaction is committed.

commit:

commit() is used to commit the current transaction. It always issues flush() beforehand to flush any remaining state to the database; this is independent of the “autoflush” setting. If no transaction is present, it raises an error. Note that the default behavior of the Session is that a “transaction” is always present; this behavior can be disabled by setting autocommit=True. In autocommit mode, a transaction can be initiated by calling the begin() method.

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Straight from the documentation:

commit() is used to commit the current transaction. It always issues flush() beforehand to flush any remaining state to the database.

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The easiest way I know how to explain what these do is to just show you, using echo=True

>>> session.flush()
BEGIN (implicit)
INSERT INTO users (username, password) VALUES (?, ?)
('alice', None)
>>> session.commit()
COMMIT
>>> 
flush() causes the data to be sent to the database. commit() causes a COMMIT, which tells the database to keep the data that was just sent. As others have stated, commit() will also cause a flush() to occur, if it's needed.

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