Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string that looks like that

arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string {with space} ar3 1

It is split by space, but string may contain spaces as well, so it causes problems for strings with spaces. I still need to split this string, but I'd like to do not split string contained in curl braces and prefixed by string keyword. That means that the string above should be split like that

arg1
{0
1}
arg2
{5
87}
string
{with space}
ar3
1

Can't implement this, I really need to read a lot about regular expressions. Could you please help me?

share|improve this question
2  
You will probably want to do this in two passes. Although it may be possible with a single regex, it would probably make your eyes bleed or your head explode. –  Jason McCreary Sep 19 '11 at 13:41
    
Yeah, regular expressions can do that actually :) Then I would appreciate some solution to split by space preserving any text in curl braces. –  axe Sep 19 '11 at 13:43
    
Is there a restriction on what ype of regular expression you can use to do this with? Are you, for example, trying to do this in Perl or with sed? –  Kusalananda Sep 19 '11 at 13:47
    
I'm using QRegExp, it is modeled on Perl's regexp. –  axe Sep 19 '11 at 13:48
    
see my updated answer –  Kent Sep 19 '11 at 14:20

2 Answers 2

step 1:split with space as usual, get an array

step 2: go through the array, if find {[a-zA-Z]+, join the next element with a space, and remove the next element.

then you got what you want. the following awk command shows as an example.

echo "arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string {with space} ar3 1"|awk '{split($0,a); 
for(i=1;i<=length(a);i++){
  if(a[i]~/{[a-zA-Z]+/){a[i]=a[i]" "a[i+1];delete a[i+1];} 
  if(a[i])print a[i];} }'

arg1
{0
1}
arg2
{5
87}
string
{with space}
ar3
1

==update==

OK, based on your comment, this works too:

step1, find out those strings that you don't want to "split", replace with a special string. and important is saving found strings to another array. The pattern in grep example:

echo "arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string {with space} ar3 1 {abc def} {xyz zyx}"|grep -E -o '\{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\}'

        {with space}
        {abc def}
        {xyz zyx}

after replace:xxxxxxxxx as the special string

kent$  echo "arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string {with space} ar3 1 {abc def} {xyz zyx}"|sed -r 's#\{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\}#xxxxxxxxx#g'

arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string xxxxxxxxx ar3 1 xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx

step2, do split

step3, replace the special string back with right index.

share|improve this answer
    
Why to split and then join? This looks like unnecessary operations. Isn't it worth to do not split unnecessary strings instead? –  axe Sep 19 '11 at 14:05
    
Thanks, but \{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\} doesn't work for me. echo "arg1 {0 1} arg2 {5 87} string {with space} ar3 1 {abc def} {xyz zyx}"|grep -E -o '\{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\}' prints nothing on my PC. Any ideas what is going on? –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 5:43
    
is your grep an alias? try echo "...."|egrep -o "\{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\}" is it working? I tried and it works under Bash and Zsh with GNU grep 2.5.1. –  Kent Sep 20 '11 at 8:27
    
No, it's not. echo "...."|egrep -o "\{([a-zA-Z]+\s*)*\}" prints nothing. –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 12:05
    
Anyway, I've already solved the problem using regexp + cycle, but I'd like to split it using regular expressions only. Justin's solutions looks fine, but it doesn't work. regexr.com?2unv9 –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 12:07

I don't know QRegExp, so I don't know if it has lookaround capabilities. If it does, you could try splitting on something like this:

(?<!(^|})[^{]*\bstring\s{[^}]*)\s

That should split on any whitespace character except those inside a pair of braces immediately preceded by the word string. It will ignore the string keyword if it's already inside a set of braces.

You can also use a simplified version: (?<!\bstring\s{[^}]*)\s, although this will be affected by weird stuff like foo {string {bar qux}}.

share|improve this answer
    
QRegExp gives "bad lookahead syntax" error on ?<!. Documentation says Both zero-width positive and zero-width negative lookahead assertions (?=pattern) and (?!pattern) are supported with the same syntax as Perl. Perl's lookbehind assertions, "independent" subexpressions and conditional expressions are not supported.. Is there any workaround? –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 5:41
    
Tried this regular expression on regexr, it doesn't seem to work. regexr.com?2unv6 –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 12:09
    
@axe - Regexr uses the JavaScript engine, which doesn't support lookbehinds. Offhand, I don't see a way to make this work without lookbehinds, so if QRegExp doesn't support them I recommend using two passes, as Kent suggested. –  Justin Morgan Sep 20 '11 at 14:01
    
Qt uses engine that doesn't support some lookbehinds, looks like loop is the only way. Thanks. –  axe Sep 20 '11 at 14:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.