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I am using PyDev for development and unit-testing of my Python application. As for unit-testing, everything works great behalf the fact that content logged to any logging. Logger is not captured by the "Captured output" of PyDev.

I already forward everything logged to the standard output like this:

import sys
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.level = logging.DEBUG
logger.addHandler(logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout))

Nevertheless the "Captured output" does not display stuff logged to loggers.

Here an example unittest-script: test.py

import sys
import unittest
import logging

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.level = logging.DEBUG
logger.addHandler(logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout))

class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    def testSimpleMsg(self):
        print("AA")
        logging.getLogger().info("BB")

The console output is:

Finding files... done.
Importing test modules ... done.

testSimpleMsg (itf.lowlevel.tests.hl7.TestCase) ... AA
2011-09-19 16:48:00,755 - root - INFO - BB
BB
ok

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.001s

OK

But the CAPTURED OUTPUT for the test is:

======================== CAPTURED OUTPUT =========================
AA

Does anybody knows how to capture everything is logged to a logging.Logger during the execution of this test?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The issue is that the unittest runner replaces sys.stdout/sys.stderr before the testing starts, and the StreamHandler is still writing to the original sys.stdout.

If you assign the 'current' sys.stdout to the handler, it should work (see the code below).

import sys
import unittest
import logging

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.level = logging.DEBUG
stream_handler = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)
logger.addHandler(stream_handler)

class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    def testSimpleMsg(self):
        stream_handler.stream = sys.stdout
        print("AA")
        logging.getLogger().info("BB")

Although, a better approach would be adding/removing the handler during the test:

import sys
import unittest
import logging

logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.level = logging.DEBUG

class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    def testSimpleMsg(self):
        stream_handler = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)
        logger.addHandler(stream_handler)
        try:
            print("AA")
            logging.getLogger().info("BB")
        finally:
            logger.removeHandler(stream_handler)
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. That's it. Best thanks –  gecco Sep 20 '11 at 11:22
2  
For completeness: I need this redirection for all my unit-tests. The best solution for me is to add the new handler in the setUp-method and to remove it in the tearDown-method. –  gecco Sep 20 '11 at 11:35
    
Great answer, I expanded this to a __metaclass__ so a wrapped setUp and tearDown automatically include this –  Tobias Kienzler Apr 12 '13 at 11:18
    
Why is it better to add/remove handlers instead of keeping them outside of test case? –  mlt Feb 28 at 1:33
    
I think it's better because you can customize it for a specific function or add more info (instead of having to update the handler stream for each call). The final solution would use decorators or metaclasses anyway to wrap the tests, so, you're not really typing more code, just providing something which may be more customizable... –  Fabio Zadrozny Feb 28 at 11:34

I grew tired of having to manually add Fabio's great code to all setUps, so I subclassed unittest.TestCase with some __metaclass__ing:

class LoggedTestCase(unittest.TestCase):
    __metaclass__ = LogThisTestCase
    logger = logging.getLogger("unittestLogger")
    logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG) # or whatever you prefer

class LogThisTestCase(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        # if the TestCase already provides setUp, wrap it
        if 'setUp' in dct:
            setUp = dct['setUp']
        else:
            setUp = lambda self: None
            print "creating setUp..."

        def wrappedSetUp(self):
            # for hdlr in self.logger.handlers:
            #    self.logger.removeHandler(hdlr)
            self.hdlr = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)
            self.logger.addHandler(self.hdlr)
            setUp(self)
        dct['setUp'] = wrappedSetUp

        # same for tearDown
        if 'tearDown' in dct:
            tearDown = dct['tearDown']
        else:
            tearDown = lambda self: None

        def wrappedTearDown(self):
            tearDown(self)
            self.logger.removeHandler(self.hdlr)
        dct['tearDown'] = wrappedTearDown

        # return the class instance with the replaced setUp/tearDown
        return type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

Now your test case can simply inherit from LoggedTestCase, i.e. class TestCase(LoggedTestCase) instead of class TestCase(unittest.TestCase) and you're done. Alternatively, you can add the __metaclass__ line and define the logger either in the test or a slightly modified LogThisTestCase.

share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome usage of __metaclass__ –  Randy Dec 11 '13 at 15:42
1  
@Randy Thanks, after reading this great explanation of __metaclass__ I just had to use it... –  Tobias Kienzler Dec 11 '13 at 20:41
    
I found myself reading the same answer last week and it has already made it into my code base too. –  Randy Dec 12 '13 at 1:18
    
Nice solution, but purely for informational purposes, you could do a superclass and inherit the run() to do your custom setup, call the original run() and then do your custom tearDown (if you want to create a subclass without having to call setUp/tearDown) -- not that metaclasses aren't useful, but I think the final code becomes more complex ;) –  Fabio Zadrozny Feb 28 at 11:40
    
@FabioZadrozny True, though as mentioned at that time I just had to use metaclasses ;) –  Tobias Kienzler Feb 28 at 12:04

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