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I am currently doing the following to generate a value at compile time, which works:

        //if B is true, m_value = TRUEVAL, else FALSEVAL, T is the value type
        template<bool B, class T, T TRUEVAL, T FALSEVAL>
        struct ConditionalValue
        {
            typedef T Type;

            Type m_value;

            ConditionalValue():
            m_value(TRUEVAL)
            {}
        };

        template<class T, T TRUEVAL, T FALSEVAL>
        struct ConditionalValue<false, T, TRUEVAL, FALSEVAL>
        {
            typedef T Type;

            Type m_value;

            ConditionalValue():
            m_value(FALSEVAL)
            {}
        };

Then you can simply do something like this:

template<class T>
void loadPixels(uint32 _w, uint32 _h, T * _pixels)
{
    PixelDataType::Type pixelType = PixelDataType::Auto; //enum I want to set

    ConditionalValue<boost::is_same<T, uint8>::value, PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::UInt8, PixelDataType::Auto> checker;
    pixelType = checker.m_value;

   ConditionalValue<boost::is_same<T, uint16>::value, PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::UInt16, PixelDataType::Auto> checker2;
   pixelType = checker2.m_value;

   ...

}

I know this example does not make much sense, but I use that code to set the value of an enum at compile time.- So here is my question: Is there something like that in std/boost type traits allready? When browsing through the reference I only found conditional which does almost what I want, but only generates a type, not a value.

EDIT:

Updated example.

Edit2:

I just realized that boost::is_same::value is all I need to solve my problem.- As for the answer to the question: There does not seem to be anything included in std/boost for good reason as pointed out by thiton

EDIT3: If you are still looking for a solution to create a value at compile time, you can either use my code wich works. If you are looking for something very close to boost/stl Kerrek's or Nawaz seem to be valid solutions too. If you are looking for a solution that assigns the correct enum at compile time Luc Touraille approach seems to be interesting even though i decided it's overkill for my situation!

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Why can't you just write bool b = boost::is_same<T, uint8>::value; and skip the checker entirely? I think you need a better example to motivate this, because it sounds like what you are asking for is actually more work than what already exists. –  Nemo Sep 19 '11 at 15:06
1  
yeah, the example is stupid.- as stated I am trying to set the value of an enum at compile time.- I will update the example i guess. –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:08
    
Regarding Edit2: There are solutions, @Kerrek and I both give you some. These are perhaps not useful for your particular use case, but are very valuable when doing more heavy metaprogramming. –  Luc Touraille Sep 19 '11 at 15:42
    
I will edit the answer and point that out! –  moka Sep 20 '11 at 7:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it's the simple answer: Because the operator ?: can select values quite well. Types are harder to select, that's why boost constructs exist for that. For pathological cases, the boost::mpl magic Luc suggested is fine, but it should be quite rare.

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ah, your answer just made me realize that I am thinking way too complicated for the problem, ty.- boost::is_same<T, uint16>::value is all i need to do what I want! –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:25
    
@moka: Yes, that was sort of the point of my comment :-) –  Nemo Sep 19 '11 at 15:27
    
@moka Indeed, if the values are only needed at runtime, there is no need to select them at compile-time. This would be useful only if you want to use them in other template constructs, or perform computation on them during compilation. If that is not the case, the ternary operator or even simple ifs are much more appropriate! –  Luc Touraille Sep 19 '11 at 15:39
    
@Luc Touraille yes, true. I think I was confused since I wanted to check a template argument and thus wrongly concluded that I had to do the check at compile time too :) –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:45
1  
Even if you need the values in template constructs, operator ?: works most of the time. –  thiton Sep 19 '11 at 16:33

A combination of std::conditional and std::integral_constant might work in some situations:

template <bool B, typename T, T trueval, T falseval>
struct conditional_val : std::conditional<B,
       std::integral_constant<T, trueval>,
       std::integral_constant<T, falseval>>::type
{ };

Now use:

const int q = conditional_val<B, int, 12, -8>::value;

Equivalently:

const int q = B ? 12 : -8;
share|improve this answer
    
Oh right, I forgot those were added in C++11! –  Luc Touraille Sep 19 '11 at 15:19
    
@Luc: Even if you don't have support for that yet, you can get it from <tr1/functional> or <boost/functional.hpp>, so this should be widely available one way or another. (The final example doesn't even need either :-) .) –  Kerrek SB Sep 19 '11 at 15:36

Boost.MPL has a set of classes to manipulate data types at compile-time, along with some arithmetic operations. These classes wrap a value into a type, for instance the integer 4 can be represented by the type mpl::int_<4>.

You can use these in compile-time conditional:

typedef typename 
    mpl::if_< 
        boost::is_same< T, uint8 >, 
        mpl::int_< 42 >, 
        mpl::int_< 187 >
    >::type result;

int i = result::value;

MPL also provides a generic integral wrapper that you can use with your enums:

template<class T>
void loadPixels(uint32 _w, uint32 _h, T * _pixels)
{
    PixelDataType::Type pixelType = PixelDataType::Auto; //enum I want to set

    typedef typename mpl::if_<
        boost::is_same<T, uint8>, 
        mpl::integral_c<PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::UInt8>,
        mpl::integral_c<PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::Auto>
    >::type checker;

    pixelType = checker::value;

    typedef typename mpl::if_<
        boost::is_same<T, uint16>, 
        mpl::integral_c<PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::UInt16>,
        mpl::integral_c<PixelDataType::Type, PixelDataType::Auto>
    >::type checker2;

    pixelType = checker2::value;

    ...
}

If you have a lot of mapping like this to do, you could consider using a mixed compile-time/runtime data structure such as fusion::map, but that is probably a bit overkill :):

typedef fusion::map<
    fusion::pair<uint8, PixelDataType::Type>,
    fusion::pair<uint16, PixelDataType::Type> >
map_type;

map_type pixelTypesMap(
    make_pair<uint8>(PixelDataType::UInt8),
    make_pair<uint16>(PixelDataType::UInt16));

...

template<class T>
void loadPixels(uint32 _w, uint32 _h, T * _pixels)
{
    // need special handling if T is not in the map
    PixelDataType::Type pixelType = fusion::at_key<T>(pixelTypesMap);

    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
ah didn' see your update, this looks great/useful too, with the mapping, thanks! –  moka Sep 20 '11 at 8:01

You can write yourself:

namespace extend 
{
  template<bool B, class T, T X, T Y>  
  struct conditional
  {
       static const T value = X;
  };
  template<class T, T X, T Y>  
  struct conditional<false,T,X,Y>
  {
       static const T value = Y;
  };
}

//test
assert(conditional<std::is_same<int,int>::value, int, 10, 20>::value == 10);
assert(conditional<std::is_same<int,char>::value, int, 10, 20>::value == 20);
share|improve this answer
    
I allready wrote it myself....I asked if there was something like that inside std/boost typetraits so that I could use that instead. –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:14
2  
@moka: So, you downvoted? –  Nawaz Sep 19 '11 at 15:16
    
yes, but that was wrong, so i upvoted your comment, sorry. –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:36
    
@moka: That is very ungrateful and discouraging attitude of you. I tried to help and you punished me for that. –  Nawaz Sep 19 '11 at 15:40
    
at that moment I simply thought your answer was wrong to my question.- What else can I do but apologize and upvote again? –  moka Sep 19 '11 at 15:43

I came across a case where I needed to do exactly what ? does (compare values, return values) but using template specialization (why would you ever need that? simple: compile time evaluation of ? can lead to "unreachable code" warnings)

So the most standard solution which works for your original question as well as for mine imho is:

std::conditional<myval, 
                 std::integral_constant<T, val>, 
                 std::integral_constant<T, val>
                >::type::value;

Now simply replace "myval" with std::is_same and you have a solution for your case (compare types, return values), while above is a solution for my case (compare values, return values <=> ?)

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